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Westinghouse electric motor

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by Lapowers, Mar 16, 2014.

  1. Lapowers

    Lapowers Iron Registered Member

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    I bought a south bend lathe with a westinghouse 1/2 hp motor 115 volt style801038 series Ed there is no wiring diagram and I'm not sure how to wire it there are 5 wires was wondering if anyone had any insight
     
  2. rdhem2

    rdhem2 United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Someone can most certainly help. We need pictures, nameplate information, wire color/numbers. More info the better. We will wait.
     
  3. Mac1

    Mac1 Active User Active Member

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    This probably not much help, but are there five wires sticking out or are there five terminals? If you have five terminals, get a flashlight and look closely at the base. They may have a letter or number mark . If you see L1 and L2, then these are probably the hot and neutral terminals you connect to. The other terminals are most likely for wiring for 220 or reversing the rotation.
    If you just have five loose wires, its going to be harder to figure out.
    Good luck
     
  4. Mac1

    Mac1 Active User Active Member

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    Look at this thread, it has some pictures showing typical details.
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php?t=16527
     
  5. Lapowers

    Lapowers Iron Registered Member

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    I have 6 wires they are marked f-1,s-1,f-2,a-1,a-2 and one un marked wire .
     
  6. Mac1

    Mac1 Active User Active Member

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    motcon2.jpg
    I don't recognize any of the wire labels you found, but I'm not a motorman
    I would suspect the above diagram is what your motor should be. In other words 110/220, reversible.Ignore the P1 and P2 ,your motor may not have a thermal protector. I would first identify the Aux or start winding. The motor should have a centrifugal start switch and its leads will go to the start wind or starting Capacitor. It also may not have a Capacitor . If you don't see one on the motor, it doesn't.
    You will need an ohmmeter to identify the Run windings. If you can identify the four wires that go to the two run windings, for 110 volt use they will be connected in parallel as shown in the table above. You are probably going to have to make some guesses and plug it in and see what happens. With a little luck and if you plug and unplug real quick you won't hurt it.
    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious H-M Supporter-Premium

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    does the motor have a capacitor(s)?
     
  8. Lapowers

    Lapowers Iron Registered Member

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    No capacitor unless its inside the motor also I just noticed its a dc motor 115 volts 4.7 amps
     
  9. John Hasler

    John Hasler United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    How did you conclude that?
     
  10. jim18655

    jim18655 United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The wire markings you gave agree with DC compound wound motor windings. It probably had a variable speed DC drive at one time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2014
  11. Lapowers

    Lapowers Iron Registered Member

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    Yes it did have variable speed
     
  12. Wireaddict

    Wireaddict United States Active User Active Member

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    According to "Ugly's Electrical References" handbook this is a compound-wound motor; F1,F2 are the shunt field leads; S1,S2 are the series field leads [& A1,A2 are the armature leads]. For constant speed connect the shunt field, F1 & F2, across the 115V DC power leads & connect the armature & series field windings in series with each other so that S1 connects to one side of the DC power, S2 to A1 & A2 connects to the other DC power lead. F1 & S1 should go to one DC power lead & A2 & F2 to the other. If the motor runs backwards reverse shunt field leads F1 & F2. If you want the motor reversible add a reversing switch between the power supply & the shunt field leads.

    If you want to make the motor speed adjustable that will be a challenge unless you have a DC power supply with both a constant voltage output for the shunt field & a variable output for the armature & series field. If you change the voltage across all the motor windings together the speed won't change much because lowering the current in the series field & armature lowers the armature speed & lowering the current through the shunt field raises the speed at the same time & vice versa. I found a way to change compound-wound motor speed fed from a constant DC voltage supply that uses a 3-terminal rheostat, probably 100 ohms & rated at over 3 KW [full load motor amps squared X 100 ohms X 1.25 safety factor], which might be hard to find & pricey. I made a sketch of how to do this & scanned it but, when I tried to attach it, it was nowhere to be found although it's file's sitting on the desktop; probably a Linux-Windows issue. If you're interested in pursuing speed control with a rheostat send me a PM & I'll attach the drawing to an email.
     
  13. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

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    I believe a KB electronics or Dayton type SCR controller would be able to run it, they usually have a fixed DC output tap for the field. A lot more practical and affordable than a huge rheostat!
    Mark S.
     

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