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repairing my $9 lathe and milling machine, victims of hurricane sandy

eweissman

Active Member
Active Member
#1
so, i just acquired a mill and a lathe off of ebay for $9 from a fellow whose house was flooded in Long Island during Sandy.
mill is an rf-45 clone, a zay7045fg/2 is the exact model number...?
according to the seller, it was purchased directly from the factory, and is unbranded.
surprisingly large, i bet it weighs more than my rockwell 21-100 knee mill.
i am assuming most of the electricals on both are no good...
lathe is a cz1224g. 12 x 24, gap bed, geared head.
seems decent enough from what i have seen so far.

might just sell the mill along / fix it up a bit as i dont really need it.
the lathe i was hoping to use. it will need a new motor. the rest of it actually doesnt
look too bad. it was on a 3 foot base, so i dont think the lathe got flooded with sea water at all,
but it was left in the rain a while after the hurricane.

wondering if anyone can help find a replacement motor.
heres the motor details.
the present motor is 220, would prefer 110 if possible.

bolt spacing: approx 4.8 in x 5.4 in

shaft dimensions: .949 in shaft x 2 inches long (seems like weird shaft size, close to 24 mm?)
model number: yl-9024 motor
1100 w 220v 7 amps
1700 rpm
double capacitor single phase (run and start capacitor)

and some photos:
https://picasaweb.google.com/100633...authkey=Gv1sRgCJDMyPq69LjP5wE&feat=directlink


thanks all
-eian
 

darkzero

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
$9 as in less then the cost of a steak dinner for bothe lathe & mill???

Damn, that has to be by far the best deal I have ever heard of. Awesome score! They don't even look bad.
 

AR1911

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#3
Nice score! You do suck, you know.

What's the HP rating of that motor? I don't know that I've seen more than 1 HP on 110V.
 

Old Iron

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#5
If it were me I would get the motor apart clean every thing and put in some new bearings bet it would work fine.

Paul
 

pdentrem

Active User
Active Member
#6
In my area there was and is prone to power black outs. Usually when the basement is flooding, so the sump stops pumping. Many have not submersible pumps that end up being underwater for some periods of time, my Dad included. Most time, surprisingly they start up and continue working when the power is restored. Dangerous yes but if you stay out of the water you are ok.

Unless salt water got to the electrics, a cleaning may be all that is needed, as Old Iron stated.

BTW the power company headquarters is here as well. You would think that this would make things better. Guess not:thinking::nuts:
Pierre
 
Last edited:

Rbeckett

Platinum
Rest In Peace
#7
I was gonna say, let it dry out, pull it apart and clean it thoroughly and re-assemble. Bet it runs just fine. If it runs, let it run for a good long while to dry any moisture still in the windings and call it good. Unless it was hooked to power and under water at the same time it is unlikely that the electronics were even damaged. Before I spent any of my hard earned cash I would give everything else a try first. Then you can always upgrade to a VFD and repower them with that sewing machine motor Jumps4 found on Ebay. Worth a look anyway. And there are less expensive options if the electrics are fried. It looks like a win-win situation...


Bob
 

jgedde

Active User
Active Member
#8
so, i just acquired a mill and a lathe off of ebay for $9 from a fellow whose house was flooded in Long Island during Sandy.
mill is an rf-45 clone, a zay7045fg/2 is the exact model number...?
according to the seller, it was purchased directly from the factory, and is unbranded.
surprisingly large, i bet it weighs more than my rockwell 21-100 knee mill.
i am assuming most of the electricals on both are no good...
lathe is a cz1224g. 12 x 24, gap bed, geared head.
seems decent enough from what i have seen so far.

might just sell the mill along / fix it up a bit as i dont really need it.
the lathe i was hoping to use. it will need a new motor. the rest of it actually doesnt
look too bad. it was on a 3 foot base, so i dont think the lathe got flooded with sea water at all,
but it was left in the rain a while after the hurricane.

wondering if anyone can help find a replacement motor.
heres the motor details.
the present motor is 220, would prefer 110 if possible.

bolt spacing: approx 4.8 in x 5.4 in

shaft dimensions: .949 in shaft x 2 inches long (seems like weird shaft size, close to 24 mm?)
model number: yl-9024 motor
1100 w 220v 7 amps
1700 rpm
double capacitor single phase (run and start capacitor)

and some photos:
https://picasaweb.google.com/100633...authkey=Gv1sRgCJDMyPq69LjP5wE&feat=directlink


thanks all
-eian
Nice score! I bet that motor would work again if you take it apart, give it a good cleaning with water, a bake of the windings in the oven at <180 degrees, then replace the bearings... The impregnation on the windings will have protected them from the salt. The only thing that needs some attention is the centrifugal switch and possibly the capacitors (but I doubt it).

One more thing... If the motor was submerged, then so was the drum switch (on the front near the bottom right of the headstock). It's under a small cover.

John
 

Ben

Active User
Active Member
#9
I am on the same page as jgedde. You should be able to rinse it out with freshwater and if the water isnt too hard(you know letting minerals deposit), let it dry, change the bearings and be good to go. Working on factory trawlers in Alaska we had motors submerged in saltwater all the time that we rinsed out, used electric motor cleaner like this

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003NTS890

set em by the main engine to dry, replace the bearings and they were good to go. If you have a friend that has a meg ohmmeter
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/me...est-instruments/megger/ecatalog/N-b9pZ1z13hdo

you can have them test the resistance to ground just to be sure.

Dont forget to check the other electrical equipment that got wet like John said.
 

bl00

Active Member
Active Member
#10
I saw your ad on craigslist for the mill and was going to post a link in the for sale section here. If I hadn't bought a mill two weeks ago I would probably be in your driveway right now.
 

eweissman

Active Member
Active Member
#11
thanks for all the advice folks. thats why i love this forum.
good suggestions. one problem is, i had to take the whole lathe apart into pieces to get it into my house, and down the basement stairs.
while taking the electric panel off, i had to disconnect a few things. the electric panel on this lathe is crazy. after having only ever dealt with
the wiring on the drum switch on a 1942 south bend 9in, i was pretty shocked at the complexity of this thing. there are a million relays, switches
all over the thing. i dont think i'll ever be able to get it back together again, even after taking pictures of the process of taking it apart.

was thinking it might be worth just swapping over the motor from the south bend. its only a half-horse but an oldie and a goodie..
its 110, 7 amps. i think its a dayton. its actually larger than the 220 2hp chinese motor that came with the lathe.
the down side is i lose the motor reversing lever on the front of the lathe, but i can just use the drum switch for that.
and besides, those reversing levers seem kinda sketchy on a lathe with a threaded chuck... not sure if that would be
strong enough of a motor, but it is an old american actual 1/2 horse vs a chinese 2hp peak rated motor....?

i could try cleaning it, tried to take it apart tonight but was having a hell of a time getting the covers to separate from either end.
took the screws out, but the covers didnt seem to want to slide off.

also dont want to electrocute myself if the capacitors are still holding some juice... not sure if you have to discharge them first?
maybe that already happened when the thing got filled with water?
 

jgedde

Active User
Active Member
#12
Don't worry about the caps. They have long since leaked down to zero... An elelctrolytic cap in a motor is not like a TV flyback capacitor. They leak down fairly rapidly.

John
 

eweissman

Active Member
Active Member
#13
just to let folks know, i did decide to go with a drum switch and another old, 110 v motor i had around. its 1hp, and i think it'll be sufficient.
i just posted some questions about the drum switch in the electrical section.
here is a snippet here:

here is my sketch of the wire panel on the motor i am wiring up for my 12x chinese lathe
and the drum switch wire configuration.


i have the "L shaped" type drum switch. its a dayton.
the motor has six wires labeled t1, t3, t5 and t8 t2 t4.
i show what terminals i will connect them to on the drum switch in the first drawing.
this is to be set up for 110 v. the second drawing is a clearer drawing of the wiring configuration
of the motor for 110 v.


pictures here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/100633410173082846352/20130601?authuser=0&feat=directlink