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[4]

110v or 220v for camel back drill press

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Glenn Brooks

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#1
hello all,

Can anyone say what the pros and cons are for powering an old Canedy -Otto 21" Camelback drill press with 110 or 220 v motor?

Iam getting ready to restore this old DP and need to mount an old 1HP induction motor as primary power source. I can wire the motor for either 110 or 220 single phase. I have both circuits in the shop, so no big deal either way. The DP does have power down feed, so potentially it could hog out a lot of material while drilling with a large bit, or threading with a tap if I add a taping head.

I am thinking of going with 110v as it is a little more convenient regarding location on the shop floor. Also, might be easier to sell latter on when we downsize.

However I really don't have a feel for how the DP would actually work with 110 versus 220. Is their advantage, one way or the other?

Looks like prior to this, the DP was run off a line shaft!

IMG_1099.JPG IMG_1101.JPG IMG_1113.JPG IMG_1121.JPG

Thanks much,
Glenn
 

Dave Paine

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#2
For a 1HP motor I would not expect you could tell any difference in the drill press operation on 110 vs 220V. Even a 15 amp 110V circuit should have no issues starting the motor.

As you mentioned, 110V operation is more common in the shop if you sell the drill press. Sounds like the motor can be run on either 110 or 220V so even if a buyer wanted 220V all they would need to do is re-wire the terminal box and change the plug.

A nice old piece of machinery. They do not build them like that any more.
 

Silverbullet

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#3
Look at the amperage it draws 110 15 amps 220 @about 7 1/2 amps . Cost less to run using 220 . 3 phase would be about 3 amps +-.
 

Blackjackjacques

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#4
Assuming a 1 hp motor, or about 1000 VA

120 V / 240V

Running current 8.3A / 4.16
OCP device @ 250% 20A 2 pole / 15A 1-pole
Conductor 12 awg / 16 awg

No real advantage in this case and likely more of a nuisance since you need to allocate 2 panel spaces for a 2-pole breaker, and you make the device unecessarily esoteric.
If you had a larger motor, say >5 hp, than you can reap some more advantage in the way of smaller breakers/conductors, etc, but not for a small 1 HP motor.
 

wawoodman

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#5
Agreed. 1 HP and down, 110. 1-1/2, either way. 2+, 220.

Them’s my numbers, and I’m sticken’ to ‘em!
 

benmychree

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#6
The motor will develop the same amount of power on 120V or 240V; the only difference is the amperage, on 120V it will draw twice the amperage as on 240V; what this means is that the wiring would generally have to be heavier for low volts. There is no difference in cost of power, the watts are the same on either voltage; amps X volts = watts.
 

Glenn Brooks

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#7
Thanks all, for your replies. I think I will set it up for 110v. Much simplistic and more versatile this way for sure. Second, looks like no advantage gained with 220v as far as physically operating the machine.

Appreciate your input!

Glenn
 

markba633csi

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#8
Glenn: motors generally run cooler, switch contacts last longer on 230v. More efficient. Choose 115v for portability under 1 hp.
Mark S.
 
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