[4]

935 floor base

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
590
Likes
399
#1
I'm considering this machine. My shop (garage) floor has a bit of grade/slope so my current (RF-45 type) mill required those rubber leveling pads under the stand. But the 935 is a heavier machine. Can I still use pads like this in the existing holes of the casting base, or is the machine weight getting up there & it needs to be supported with a rigid base & somehow grouted or shimmed? I noticed some of you have the mill sitting on a welded base. Is this more for increasing the table work height or related to how it rests on the floor? I'll have to measure my actual ceiling height but guessing I don't have a ton of excess headroom. hence the questions.
 

Attachments

Swerdk

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
137
Likes
21
#2
I did a welded base with metal leveling feet for height ( machine is short - I am 6 ft) and for Unleveled surface. It works great. At work now so can’t post pics


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
590
Likes
399
#3
Thanks. That was my other question. Do average folks find the existing table height a bit on low side or OK? I'm 5'-10.
 

Kiwi Canuck

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 27, 2016
Messages
218
Likes
188
#4
The PM935 is a bit low, I'm 6'2" and need to raise it 6" minimum. You may find the height OK as is, but 2 - 3" lift would be better.

The base is hollow underneath, the bolt holes are only in the top part of the casting, so you will need a base that you place the mill onto and mount leveling feet to.

David.
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
590
Likes
399
#5
Ah. That probably explains the stepped base configuration I think I'm seeing here.
 

Attachments

NortonDommi

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
334
Likes
216
#6
I used some of these on both my Mill/Drill and Lathe with 16 mm Galvanised Bolts and they work great, the cost was within budget as well. It is mid Winter and after a couple of weeks of torrential rain I had a flood,(1"),through the garage, so glad everything was up off the floor, made clean-up a lot easier.
 

Attachments

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#7
Here is what I did with my PM935 that arrived last week. I wanted it up on leveling feet and to increase the height of the machine off the floor just enough that my pallet jack forks would clear going under the mill from the side (forks are 21" wide, 3.5" tall, the cutout is 24", but I needed another 1.5 inches of height for them to clear).

I started with two pieces of 1/4" thick 3x4 angle, 26" long, clipped off the 3" side corners at 45-degrees, flap-disc'd off the mill scale and radiused the corners and eased all the edges.

IMG_2246.jpg

IMG_2247.jpg

I ordered 3" diameter leveling feet from McMaster 6111K247 - could have gotten away with the 2" high versions instead of the 4" versions I ordered. These feet are 3/4-10 thread, come with a locknut, but no washers or other nuts (which I ordered separately).

IMG_2261.jpg

I decided to use 5/8" AllThread to attach the angle plates to the mill through the holes in the base of the PM935, and set the leveling feet outside the base of the machine to improve stability. 10" long all thread into tapped 5/8 holes (which are 417mm apart CL-to-CL), the leveling feet were placed 60mm in from the end of the angle brackets:

IMG_2251.jpg

After drilling and tapping, I primed and painted the angle brackets:

IMG_2252.jpg

After two coats, and installation on the PM935, this is what the finished platform looks like. The 5/8 AllThread fits the 3/4" holes in the machine base just fine. I will probably end up trimming off the tops of those once everything else is settled.

IMG_2282.jpg

IMG_2284.jpg

IMG_2286.jpg

Since the floor here is 1.25" T&G commercial decking plywood on stringers, my plan is to drill out 4" diameter holes in the floor and put in 4" diameter solid aluminum round bar stand-offs that will go down to the concrete floor below, turned to match the height of the floor. I'll post on that once finished. And it's also time to re-paint the floor, obviously.

Hope this helps.
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#8
Oh, and if you like the pucker factor associated with rigging a machine into an elevator shaft, here is what I did yesterday:


IMG_7165.jpg
IMG_2274.jpg
IMG_2278.jpg
IMG_2276.jpg

More to come . . .
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
590
Likes
399
#9
Some good ideas here, glad I asked.

David, does the 5" gap to accommodate the forks correspond to under the casting, or do you mean you would jack the legs so they go under the steel frame? Anyway, that seems like a very smart way to get in & out on the floor without overhead equipment.

ps - Wow. That is one heck of rigging thread-the-needle job. Now I feel kind of silly worrying about how to roll mine in & out of the double wide garage door
pss - I seem to recall you had an (PM version) RF-45 & were about to commence your patented overclocking & soup-up routine like the lathe. Did you opt for this mill instead or did I miss the build?
 

Attachments

Kiwi Canuck

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 27, 2016
Messages
218
Likes
188
#10
David, nice to see you have received your PM935 and looking forward to seeing your build thread.
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#11
Some good ideas here, glad I asked.

David, does the 5" gap to accommodate the forks correspond to under the casting, or do you mean you would jack the legs so they go under the steel frame? Anyway, that seems like a very smart way to get in & out on the floor without overhead equipment.

ps - Wow. That is one heck of rigging thread-the-needle job. Now I feel kind of silly worrying about how to roll mine in & out of the double wide garage door
pss - I seem to recall you had an (PM version) RF-45 & were about to commence your patented overclocking & soup-up routine like the lathe. Did you opt for this mill instead or did I miss the build?
I just needed to be able to get under the mill from the side with the pallet forks. The base casting reliefs on the side of the PM935 base are 24" wide and about 2" tall, and I needed a 3.5" gap to get under there. Once I get the floor platforms installed, and the leveling feet adjusted, I will have the necessary space to come under the machine from the side just fine. I have 83" ceiling height, so I can't go too much more since the mill itself is 77" for without the leveling platform (it's the standard pulley drive system, not the variable reeves drive version).

The PM935 replaced my Rong Fu 45 which I've had for 15 years and has served me well. My RF45 was the original from Taiwan, with 2-speed motor and power downfeed, and was purchased by a friend in Hawaii - we got that out of the shop yesterday also, and crated for shipment using the crating materials from the PM935. The forklift was the challenge, because it left only 3mm clearance coming through the door to the basement shaft entrance. We ended up having to hack the forklift, taking off the safety basket at front and turning over the forks. And it was 98 degrees here yesterday. But this wasn't my first rodeo getting heavy equipment into that basement shop: https://flic.kr/s/aHsjH1qkZP

I debated which way to go with the mill upgrade for over a year. I was tempted to get a Tormach 770M, but after using one at John Saunder's shop I wasn't convinced I could do conventional manual milling with it easily, and would thus become a slave to 3D modeling on the computer for every single thing I needed to make. I don't do much metal fab production - maybe 3-4 units of anything I make at the most. I'm really a woodworker who makes specialized accessories for woodworking equipment (like this) - not a conventional machinist shop. So I decided against a CNC mill to replace the RF45. I also have space constraints that would make a CNC machine with full enclosure pretty impractical.

The PM935 takes up almost no additional floor space compared to my RF45 on it's stand. But what it will give me is a real knee (I got so tired of cranking the head on the RF45 up/down), and power feeds on the X, Y and Z. Plus the increase in rigidity, tilt/nod head, increased Y axis travel etc. This far, I'm REALLY impressed with the quality of the PM935.

I do plan a full custom edition of this PM935, maybe not quite as elaborate as the PM1340 lathe, but similar in some respects. A new electronics package with VFD controls, auto-reverse, e-stop, coolant control, tach, ring light is already in the works, and I'm waiting on the Newall 3-axis DP700 DRO with 5um microsyn scales to arrive from the UK. I already have the Align feeders for all three axis, a Mitutoyo scale kit for the quill, and will probably order a Maxi-torque PDB next week. Stay tuned. LOL
 

Clock work

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
160
Likes
118
#12
I've got about 8" clearance to the ceiling on mine which I intend to use about 7.5" of (no problem with rotation given my joist positioning) but let me say this about leveling screws.. Don't. They extend from the threaded holes near the top surface of the base which is a LONG skinny lever and results in significant instability. Just FYI in case you were thinking of it. I'll do it properly once my welding sucks less. I positioned my light on the ram instead of the base... quite happy. I like my VFD controller on the same arm as the DRO. I made the connections from the VFD electrical box which I mounted on the back of the mill stand to both the motor and to the mains feed extra long so I have the ability to set it on the work bench about 4' to the left of the table if I have to work on it live. Personally, I need to take a couple of hours and clean up the slots in the table as they were not uniform across their lengths. I had a wide, med and narrow slot. It wasn't the metal (mostly).. it was the coating. Good luck.

https://flic.kr/p/21yvvpu
 

Duker

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 20, 2014
Messages
76
Likes
29
#13
I like David’s design and if I had a pallet jack at the time I would have built something similar. I needed mine to be mobile so I welded up a mobile base with Albion casters and leveling feet that I could lock down quickly with an impact gun. The base is very solid, makes moving the mill a breeze and I got the added benefit of a “foot rest” when using a stool for long milling operations. It also raised the height to a much more comfortable level.






Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

TerryH

I have no clue what I'm doing...
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
May 8, 2018
Messages
324
Likes
493
#14
I like David’s design and if I had a pallet jack at the time I would have built something similar. I needed mine to be mobile so I welded up a mobile base with Albion casters and leveling feet that I could lock down quickly with an impact gun. The base is very solid, makes moving the mill a breeze and I got the added benefit of a “foot rest” when using a stool for long milling operations. It also raised the height to a much more comfortable level.






Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

Nice work as usual bro. Love that base.
 

Duker

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 20, 2014
Messages
76
Likes
29
#15
I like David’s design and if I had a pallet jack at the time I would have built something similar. I needed mine to be mobile so I welded up a mobile base with Albion casters and leveling feet that I could lock down quickly with an impact gun. The base is very solid, makes moving the mill a breeze and I got the added benefit of a “foot rest” when using a stool for long milling operations. It also raised the height to a much more comfortable level.






Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

Nice work as usual bro. Love that base.
Thanks Terry!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
590
Likes
399
#16
I'm looking for the min/max table dimension in the PM manual relative to casting base & don't see it. They show the other top view dimensions with extended table XY & ram (very handy!). Anybody know?
 

Attachments

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#17
Floor to top of XY table surface is 30" with the knee fully lowered, 46" with the knee fully raised. And with the knee fully raised, the gap between the spindle nose and the table is 3/4". So a typical working height with a vise is probably 42" above the floor. These assume the machine base is flat to the floor and not up on some kind of stand.
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#18
Brief update on the PM935 leveling feet saga. Added the aluminum riser blocks that transfer the leveling feet load down to the concrete floor below the plywood flooring yesterday, and leveled her up.

IMG_2328.jpg

IMG_2333.jpg

IMG_2339.jpg

IMG_2342.jpg

IMG_2344.jpg


And I'll take this as "good enough" for level:

IMG_2340.jpg

IMG_2341.jpg

Oh, and I've decided to repaint the mill. They build nice machines in Taiwan, but the paint jobs - not so much.
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
Messages
3,412
Likes
1,392
#19
I wish my 935 and 1340 were black, like my old Charter Oak. Loved the look, and it didn't show dirt! :)
 

ashtrain

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Jun 6, 2016
Messages
7
Likes
0
#20
Hi I have been lurking heavily for the past couple years; I have a 935 tv coming in a couple of weeks and am looking at whether I need a base for it.
We have a dry concrete floor basement so I have no problem with sitting it there. However I am getting the vibes that the work envelope is a little low for a 6 footer (me). I like the look of both David's and Dukers solutions. I am thinking, I should work with the machine for a while and see if more height would be desirable then take some action. Duker - do you have any specs or drawings for your moveable base? Sorry for hijacking the thread. Thanks for all the info.
talk soon
Dick w
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#21
Hi I have been lurking heavily for the past couple years; I have a 935 tv coming in a couple of weeks and am looking at whether I need a base for it.
We have a dry concrete floor basement so I have no problem with sitting it there. However I am getting the vibes that the work envelope is a little low for a 6 footer (me). I like the look of both David's and Dukers solutions. I am thinking, I should work with the machine for a while and see if more height would be desirable then take some action. Duker - do you have any specs or drawings for your moveable base? Sorry for hijacking the thread. Thanks for all the info.
talk soon
Dick w
Dick, IMO, your first decision is whether you want the mill on some kind of mobility base with wheels. If you want/need that, then a full frame like Dukers is in order. If the machine is going to be stationary, then all you really need is leveling feet and welded frame is unnecessary and might become a trip hazard depending on placement, size, etc. With just leveling feet, something more simple (like mine LOL) is sufficient. The base of the machine is pretty narrow, which is a good thing in general, but to improve stability, I recommend widening the stance as it rests on the floor if you're going to put it up on levelers or wheels or both. The top couple inches of the 935 machine base is drilled and tapped 3/4-10, but I don't recommend putting the leveling feet in those locations because at least 7" of the threaded rod will be unsupported because the base is hollow in those areas - kinda like being on stilts. Hope this helps, good luck with the new machine.
 

ptrotter

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Mar 16, 2017
Messages
27
Likes
43
#22
David
I just needed to be able to get under the mill from the side with the pallet forks. The base casting reliefs on the side of the PM935 base are 24" wide and about 2" tall, and I needed a 3.5" gap to get under there. Once I get the floor platforms installed, and the leveling feet adjusted, I will have the necessary space to come under the machine from the side just fine. I have 83" ceiling height, so I can't go too much more since the mill itself is 77" for without the leveling platform (it's the standard pulley drive system, not the variable reeves drive version).

The PM935 replaced my Rong Fu 45 which I've had for 15 years and has served me well. My RF45 was the original from Taiwan, with 2-speed motor and power downfeed, and was purchased by a friend in Hawaii - we got that out of the shop yesterday also, and crated for shipment using the crating materials from the PM935. The forklift was the challenge, because it left only 3mm clearance coming through the door to the basement shaft entrance. We ended up having to hack the forklift, taking off the safety basket at front and turning over the forks. And it was 98 degrees here yesterday. But this wasn't my first rodeo getting heavy equipment into that basement shop: https://flic.kr/s/aHsjH1qkZP

I debated which way to go with the mill upgrade for over a year. I was tempted to get a Tormach 770M, but after using one at John Saunder's shop I wasn't convinced I could do conventional manual milling with it easily, and would thus become a slave to 3D modeling on the computer for every single thing I needed to make. I don't do much metal fab production - maybe 3-4 units of anything I make at the most. I'm really a woodworker who makes specialized accessories for woodworking equipment (like this) - not a conventional machinist shop. So I decided against a CNC mill to replace the RF45. I also have space constraints that would make a CNC machine with full enclosure pretty impractical.

The PM935 takes up almost no additional floor space compared to my RF45 on it's stand. But what it will give me is a real knee (I got so tired of cranking the head on the RF45 up/down), and power feeds on the X, Y and Z. Plus the increase in rigidity, tilt/nod head, increased Y axis travel etc. This far, I'm REALLY impressed with the quality of the PM935.

I do plan a full custom edition of this PM935, maybe not quite as elaborate as the PM1340 lathe, but similar in some respects. A new electronics package with VFD controls, auto-reverse, e-stop, coolant control, tach, ring light is already in the works, and I'm waiting on the Newall 3-axis DP700 DRO with 5um microsyn scales to arrive from the UK. I already have the Align feeders for all three axis, a Mitutoyo scale kit for the quill, and will probably order a Maxi-torque PDB next week. Stay tuned. LOL


David,

Please don't do such a spectacular job customizing your PM935 and documenting the process as you did with your PM-1340GT. I spent far too many hours studying your write up and photographs, and as I am contemplating a PM-935TS in the future, I may end up doing so again. Seriously though, I truly enjoy following your work and have learned much from it. Between you, mksj and a few others on this site I have seen some truly great work and have been able to move along on mine nicely.
 

Clock work

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
160
Likes
118
#23
The top couple inches of the 935 machine base is drilled and tapped 3/4-10, but I don't recommend putting the leveling feet in those locations because at least 7" of the threaded rod will be unsupported because the base is hollow in those areas - kinda like being on stilts.
I stupidly didi that... It was like watching a boat tied to a dock... gently swaying back and forth. In the wind. I ended up only using only a single rod of the 4 I put in to stop rocking on the imperfect floor while preserving as much contact with the base as possible. The stilt effect is weak in that situation.

CW
 

Clock work

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
160
Likes
118
#24
David... is that hatchway with the stairs removed or an actual elevator shaft? I have entertained the idea of putting a 2-3k# hydraulic lift and easily removable stairs in my own hatchway to reduce the drama overtime I buy something and to bring motorcycles down to work on in a warmer space in the winter.

https://flic.kr/p/TngP8z
CW
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
215
Likes
398
#25
CW, that basement entrance is nothing more than a concrete box (with massive heel/toe retaining wall footings required by the city). There are no stairs in it, and it's used solely for the purpose of getting machinery and finished woodworking projects in or out of the basement. I have a second basement entrance with stairs for human traffic, but it's too narrow to use as equipment egress.

When I bought the house in 2011 and started exploring alternatives, I was initially thinking I'd put in a small freight elevator, then the city stuck it's nose into the project and insisted that if I did that, it would need an elevator license and yearly inspections, and insurance premiums doubled, etc. So I just left it an open box and provisioned the garage such that I could get to it with a forklift. I have occasionally pondered the idea of adding a jib crane at ground level next to the opening, but so far haven't felt the need. This is pretty much what it looks like from the basement:

IMG_7172-1.jpg

If you're interested, here is the unfinished basement to shop conversion saga: https://flic.kr/s/aHsjH1qkZP
 

Clock work

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
160
Likes
118
#26
CW, that basement entrance is nothing more than a concrete box (with massive heel/toe retaining wall footings required by the city). There are no stairs in it, and it's used solely for the purpose of getting machinery and finished woodworking projects in or out of the basement. I have a second basement entrance with stairs for human traffic, but it's too narrow to use as equipment egress.

When I bought the house in 2011 and started exploring alternatives, I was initially thinking I'd put in a small freight elevator, then the city stuck it's nose into the project and insisted that if I did that, it would need an elevator license and yearly inspections, and insurance premiums doubled, etc. So I just left it an open box and provisioned the garage such that I could get to it with a forklift. I have occasionally pondered the idea of adding a jib crane at ground level next to the opening, but so far haven't felt the need. This is pretty much what it looks like from the basement:

If you're interested, here is the unfinished basement to shop conversion saga: https://flic.kr/s/aHsjH1qkZP
Very nice work David... it's a pity about the city and insurance. Mine said if I ran a buried electrical line out to my shed that it'd raise my taxes so I put a 3 prong on it and it's just another appliance plugged into an outside outlet. They wanted to raise our taxes for a deck, so I went the route of a parade float shaped like deck which I could park right next to my house. Never finished that one:) There's actually a raised computer floor in another part of the basement we don't let the town in to which was there from a full mill-rack time-share computer with a floor-standing computer and 3 monitors I had down there in 1980 when it was my parents house. I have no respect for our town government.. a viscous tornado crawled across my old neighborhood requiring so many to rebuild. They didn't lose a beat and declared that with all the trees down, it's now a "scenic view area" because now there's nothing but sky over there and you can see the mountain. Anyway if my lift is removable and the stairs are, I think I can avoid their helpful intrusions. I'm going to look much more carefully at the story of your conversion though as I'm convinced it will have lots of excellent ideas.. our plan is to move to a place with more space to sprawl. Thank you.

CW
 

external power

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Aug 8, 2017
Messages
29
Likes
16
#27
Thanks you guy's for this thread as I have a 935tv on the way and should be here in a couple days. I have been
rearranging my shop to accept it and hope I don't have to many problems getting it in place and off the pallet.
David you are the man!! Thanks
 

hotrats

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
33
Likes
19
#28
*As far as a elevator for your cellar, a co worker used the mast and hydraulics from a forklift to make a exterior elevator for his parents to access their 2nd floor. Maybe a option to consider.
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
1,061
Likes
1,601
#29
I guess the trick there would be finding a forklift with a blade spacing the same width as the wheelchair wheels.... ;)

-frank
 

hotrats

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
33
Likes
19
#30
Most forklift forks are adjustable for spacing. My friend made a platform, seat, safety rail, gate, and emergency switch, for those that wondered. Actually, was very nice, his parents were tired of climbing the stairs.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top