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DiscoDan

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#1
#1: I am replacing the bushing in the apron for the handwheel assembly. I watched a video online of a guy doing the same and he just pressed the bushing in but I don't have a press. What is the best way to do it without a press?

#2: The guy in the video also drilled a hole to line up with the oil port. The bushing I took out did not have a hole. Do I need to do it?

#3. The crank on the compound has two handles. Is that just to help give a better grip when trying to dial in your exact cut? Mine has one handle broken off and I'm wondering if it really makes a difference.

Thanks.
 

Richard King 2

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#2
On the bushing make a stepped shaft with 2 Diameters. one to fit the inner hole with say .010 clearance and say 1/4 long. The bigger diameter would be smaller then the outside diameter of the bushing and then use a dead blow hammer and tap it out. Another way would be to pull it out by making a bushing or some use a socket that is bigger then the OD of the bushing and run a bolt with a washer on the hex end and a washer and nut on the other. The inner washer has to be smaller then the OD of bushing then hold a wrench on nut side and tighten the hex side and it will pull out the old bushing. Many times they use a "Oil-Lite" bearing which is a porous bronze bushing that oil is force pushed in at the factory so they are self lubricating. Others had ball oilers and you had to drill a lube hole in bushing.

The 2 handle crank is what you said, easier to turn. One is OK too. You should be able to use an easy out and remove the broken handle :)
 

DiscoDan

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#3
Thanks RK2. I already got the bushing out with a bolt, a washer, a nut and a deep socket! I need to get the new one in now without a press. Would a large c-clamp work? Maybe freeze the bushing first?

And I have the ball oiler so I must have to drill the hole. Maybe the last person who replaced the bushing didn't do that.
 

Richard King 2

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#4
File an angle on the leading edge of the bushing so it slides in straight. I would also file off a sharp edge on the hole if there are any. Did you measure the OD and ID of new bushing to be sure it's the bush is right size? The Clamp should work or use a bolt to pull it in with a big flat washer and smaller ones inside (opposite side) if needed. GMTA huh..lol Rich
 

markba633csi

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#5
Hi Dan, freezing often helps when pressing things together- I like to make a "blanket" using those reuseable gel packs to keep the part cold while I carry it out to the garage. Also heating the matching part with a torch or heat gun is helpful too.
mark
 

RJSakowski

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#6
I usually use a vise to press bearings in. Sockets work as impromptu bushings for installing a new bushing in a recessed area. If nothing in the tool box fits, I will just turn one on the lathe.

If you have access to the far side a bolt and nut and a couple of washers will work. I have a bushing driver set as well but don't use it to drive new bushings as a rule because it is easy to cock the bushing and distort it. It works great for driving out the old ones though.

Regarding one vs. two crank handles, the second handle broke off my Atlas/Craftsman 6 x 18 lathe decades ago. I can't say that I miss it.

A double crank handle makes it easier to make precise rotations to set that last tenth of a thousandth but will get in the way when you're trying to make multiple rotations.
 

DiscoDan

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#7
Thank you guys. I am learning so much from this site and just being forced to go through and clean up and fix what is wrong. Much better than just buying a new lathe and not understanding the parts and how/why they work.
 

benmychree

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#8
If trying to remove the broken handle with an EZ out, make sure that the handle is, in fact threaded; it may be pressed in, in which case you would have to drill it out. So far as one or two handles on a compound, nearly all that I have seen have two, and if you ate feeding the compound for such as a tapered bore, two will definitely make it easier to feed smoothly.
 

wa5cab

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#9
To turn a single-handle crank you mostly use your elbow and shoulder. To turn a small two-handle crank you can twist it using the wrist and forearm muscles or your thumb and fingers, which are capable of more precise movement.

The 9-104 handle in the two-handle crank is pressed in. And last time that I checked, still available new from Clausing. A broken off one is usually best removed by drilling and tapping a puller hole.

Some people just never have learned about sintered bronze bushings and insist on drilling holes in them. Or maybe he had replaced it with a plain brass bushing, which is not porous.
 
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