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Aluminum Repair With TIG Question

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Hi,
A co-worker asked me if I could fix his "Gold Buddy", Slues box.
Please see the pics.
These are bullet holes, someone pounded out the extrusion. I plan on cleaning as good as I can and placing the sheeting on a thick piece of aluminum to reduce the heat. Do a bit of pre-cleaning with the TIG torch then form a puddle and fill.
Any other procedures or ideas/problems with my plan?
I do have some scrap material that is the same thickness so I can get the settings close before I tackle this simple to you job.
Thanks for the help. IMG_0910[1].JPG IMG_0911[1].JPG
 

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#2
Should work fine, I use a stainless steel wire brush dedicated only for alum. Hit it with a brush and run a quick bead both sides and be done.
About an amp per thou should get your heat set up.

Paco
 
#4
I do have some scrap material that is the same thickness so I can get the settings close before I tackle this simple to you job.
That is a smart step that I try to remember to use.
However, too often I just "go for it" and then regret it later.

One more thought is using a copper backer bar.
It will help remove excess heat to prevent blow thru, and if you do blow thru it should not be welded to the work piece.
-brino
 
#5
Brino, I do have a piece of copper, I sure wouldn’t want to blow through.
Then I would have a mess.
My first instinct is to heat up and go fast to prevent such a thing.
All I’m doing is plugging a leak. I may be over thinking this.
If it was mine, I’d be done already.
Thanks
 
#6
My first instinct is to heat up and go fast to prevent such a thing.
All I’m doing is plugging a leak. I may be over thinking this.
Your practice piece will tell you a whole bunch about it. You might even go as far as putting a cold chisel or screw driver hole thru it and then pounding the wound closed flat, because filling a hole is a little different than running a bead on a flat sheet. The backer block will help keep the molten edges from "dropping out".

I don't think you're "over thinking".......just doing some research to do it right the first time.
The next time you do something similar it will be a breeze.

-brino
 
#7
What is the wall thickness? from the pic it looks to be pretty thick
 
#8
It is .060".
I dialed in 60 amps and it seemed a bit cold, I turned it up to 65 and all is well with the world.
I am pretty happy with the results. I got better as I went along, gained confidence.
My Service Manager will be satisfied I think.
The 1 amp per .001", is a great starting place. I read you may need to bump it up a bit for aluminum. That was my experience. IMG_0919[1].JPG
 
#9
Great Job!
 
#10
Thanks,
The owner pounded the holes closed.When he did that he pounded/folded in the dirt, grime, debris etc.I think it may have been easier if the holes had been left alone.
I have very little experience with aluminum, the contaminants burn off with some wild colors, smoke, etc.
You guys already know this but I am learning a new experience.
Aluminum is tricky.
 
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