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Anyone use BM P22 over P06 alkyd enamel?

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Clock work

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Greetings...

Over a not small period of time, I dug into the problem of what coatings to apply to my surface grinder and shaper. Benjamin Moore P22 or P06 primer had quite a following in painting various types of industrial equipment. I was ready to go down that path when I was just checking out the data sheets and speaking with the coatings engineers at BM and discovered a 3 week curing time. I can't believe taking an equipment out of service for three weeks for paint to cure is attractive to anyone. The BM engineers don't suggest any hardener or heating to accelerate curing so I'm on the verge of finding a new choice.

Has anyone ever used these coatings and if so, how was your experience returning it to service? Does anyone have a substitute you have used and would endorse?

LONG time ago, my family owned a non-destructive test shop that did coatings in the back and I was stuck being the top technical dude for both. We had coatings engineers from the manufacturers in on a monthly basis because they wanted to ensure their paints kept the Air Force happy, which is actually pretty easy... prep... follow the times and temps... observe all documented application instructions. Poof... perfection. From this, I'm ready to bail on P22 at this point.

CW
 

Clock work

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Continued to look in to this pretty aggressively since posting the above. Definitely have abandoned P22 as a possibility.

Two happenings... One is that solution space (the number of different potential paths) grows pretty rapidly as you dig in to the topic. People have taken a variety of diverse approaches that all don't fit into what a new arrival to the subject initially understands... and then, what a not-so-new-arrival ultimately understands. I will connect those dots without prompting:)

The second happening is that it is beyond common.. expected really... for a less than rigorous understanding or background of the decision to accompany a confident recommendation..

These combine to yield that the more I dig in, the less willing I am to implement a coatings decision. Fold in safety and the decision to not decide becomes vastly easier. I really just want to get the GD surface grinder put together semi-properly so I can 1. use it, and 2. then return to restoring the thing that interests me... the shaper. Something that's mostly easy... and mostly durable/chem-resistant... and SAFE... how can there NOT be some everybody-knows-it bullseye on that target? Not something that's perfected to some Soviet-Harvard decision optimization process but "good enough" to simply not suck and last till they plant me which isn't as far off as it was when I initially bought the grinder.

Know what I miss? Dirtbikes. I didn't have to play the sliding tile game with the woods, like I have to with my shop/basement, just to put the next thing in there.... plenty of woods out there for everyone, or at least one more ancient terminally bored retired guy on a bike! Be wherever i want to be... not like the 3.7644-degree rotation tolerance on where the SG can sit in the shop so I can squeeze in the door... don't turn the 220 panel on cuz there ain't no room for another electron in there..... A plan strides out of the mist... forget the shop... "love isn't the result of a decision":).... think I'll buy a heater and work on the bikes.

cw
 

Latinrascalrg1

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One thing to keep in mind is the difference between "dry for handling" and "Full Cure" are completely different definitions. I dont know if this makes a difference in your situation but in the auto paint industry, you can handle and work a freshly painted surface once its reached its "dry to the touch" point but it will still need time to reach a "Fully Cured" state. Again not sure if this applies to the paints you are thinking about using but it might be worth asking the suppliers that question.
 

Clock work

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One thing to keep in mind is the difference between "dry for handling" and "Full Cure" are completely different definitions. I dont know if this makes a difference in your situation but in the auto paint industry, you can handle and work a freshly painted surface once its reached its "dry to the touch" point but it will still need time to reach a "Fully Cured" state. Again not sure if this applies to the paints you are thinking about using but it might be worth asking the suppliers that question.
Much appreciated... thank you. The anecdotal comments about it picking up even finger prints 2 weeks later made the choice unappealing. It's TIGHT in my shop and in order to get at things, I have to grab the column and push the grinder back/forth as I set in on a mobile base when I lowered it in to the basement. The long-dur cure guarantees either half the shop is off limits or a 900# fingerprint card on me in the shop. I'll give up a week and do for things I can kill with Rustoleum Professional on various projects (less if it fits into my oven in the garage). 3? Too long at this age. Gotta keep moving:) Thank you again.

cw
 
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