[4]

Buying a lathe - new vs old

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Tanshanomi

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
31
Likes
11
#1
I've been wanting to pull the trigger on a lathe purchase for years. The typical advice I have heard over and over from just about every supposed expert out there is that I can "buy a good ol', solid American-made lathe for less than the useless Chinese junk they're selling nowadays."

My experience so far is that this is bunk. Well, maybe it is true in Southern California or the Northeast. Here in the Midwest, the Craigslist ads for used lathes is pretty slim pickings. Either they are corroded, incomplete units that have been sitting unused in a dirt-floor shed for forty years, or they are a 20x72 production lathe that weighs tons and has a 5-figure price. I am ready to buy a new Grizzly and take my chances.
 

Hawkeye

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
1,839
Likes
542
#2
I wouldn't be too concerned about buying an Asian lathe. Any machine you get will probably have some issues to sort out. There are plenty of sites and posts covering what people have found and how they fixed them. The same is true about nearly every piece of old iron you might find.

Check out some of the major projects on this forum. A lot of really impressive work has been done on import machines. Any solid machine, properly set up and operated within its limitations will give you many years of pleasure.

Decide what kinds of work you'd like to do and then get the biggest lathe you have room for in your shop and budget. Pay attention to features. Power crossfeed can be a wonderful thing. Imperial and metric threading can solve problems at times.

Mostly, have fun. Make lots of scrap.
 

Franklyn

Registered
Registered
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
25
Likes
1
#3
I think you will be fine with Grizzly. I bought a 1947 Logan lathe and although it was fun restoring, I would probably purchase a similar lathe from Grizzly, if I had to do it all over again. My main reason is that the lathe shows it's 67 years of wear on the ways. After buying the lathe I looked for a used mill and couldn't find one in rural VT so I bought a Grizzly mill costing around $3400. The mill was ready to go from day one and is reasonably well made. Grizzly has great customer service and delivered my mill in about 1 weeks time after the order was placed.
The mill weighed about 800 lbs and required disassembly to move it to the basement.
These are some of the lathes I would consider from Grizzly:


http://www.grizzly.com/products/11-x-26-Bench-Lathe-w-Gearbox/G9972Z


http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-x-24-Gear-Head-Cam-Lock-Spindle-Gap-Bed-Lathe/G4002


http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-x-22-Variable-Speed-Lathe/G0752


Best of luck!
 
N

Nelson

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#4
I've been wanting to pull the trigger on a lathe purchase for years. The typical advice I have heard over and over from just about every supposed expert out there is that I can "buy a good ol', solid American-made lathe for less than the useless Chinese junk they're selling nowadays."

My experience so far is that this is bunk. Well, maybe it is true in Southern California or the Northeast. Here in the Midwest, the Craigslist ads for used lathes is pretty slim pickings. Either they are corroded, incomplete units that have been sitting unused in a dirt-floor shed for forty years, or they are a 20x72 production lathe that weighs tons and has a 5-figure price. I am ready to buy a new Grizzly and take my chances.

Listen, it all comes down to this. Do you want to spend time to restore the lathe or make chips? With an Asian lathe, you will be making chips very soon. You will be learning how to machine. With an old American lathe, unless someone restored it and it is turn-key, you will have to spend time restoring it if you can.

My SB Heavy 10 is in pieces in my basement for 5 years now. Unrestored, unused, with a cabinet FULL of tooling.
Part of the problem is the way I was treated when I first started in the hobby on the SB forums online (and still am treated on the SB Yahoo forum). I am disgusted and it sits there in pieces.

If you want to make chips, buy a new Asian one, follow the instructions of the manufacturer, and make chips. You will be happier and less frustrated.
 

Shadowdog500

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 7, 2014
Messages
339
Likes
54
#5
I'm no expert, but IMHO, Unless you plan to build parts for the space shuttle I bet the Grizzly lathe will meet your needs. My current lathe (bought it about a month ago from craiglist) is a older version of what Grizzly is selling today. The small 12x36 lathe at the machine shop at work is the MSC version of the lathe Grizzly sells. Both work great for what I need to do and I can hit anything to 0.001" which is all I need to do.

I had a 7x12 mini lathe for 7 years because it was all I had space for before I built my shop. After going through everything on the lathe it worked great. The biggest issue with the mini lathe was the size limitation on what you could make and the fact that it used change gears for threading. Change gears get old real quick. Whatever lathe you get I would recommend getting quick change gears.


The one thing I do wonder is how easy it will be to get parts for the Asian lathes in 10to 20 years. If you look hard enough you can find just about anything for a southbend. I'm not even sure what factory in Taiwan built my lathe, and I understand some parts are already un obtainable.

Chris
 
Last edited:

chuckorlando

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
1,631
Likes
17
#6
The problem with buying used machines is time. There are good deals to be had every where you just have to be looking all the time and willing to wait till you find one. I do believe you can get more for your money buying used. Regardless of age or where it came from it's used. We have asian lathes at school as well as old iron. I enjoy the old ones the best. But others like the newer ones. Both get the job done. But if we are looking at purchase price for capacity, I could buy two of our old ones for the price of one new one, and have twice the capacity per machine.

This assumes your buying a non wore out used machine.

http://seks.craigslist.org/tls/4458033786.html

http://wichita.craigslist.org/tls/4504892432.html

http://wichita.craigslist.org/tls/4488011494.html

http://wichita.craigslist.org/hvo/4478694890.html

http://kansascity.craigslist.org/tls/4432404282.html

I did not read them just looked for a few lathes under 3k or so and not 70in
 

pineyfolks

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
1,076
Likes
415
#7
Buy old iron you most likely have to repair worn or broken parts. Buy import you most likely have to repair new parts. I just hate having to work on something new. What ever you buy there will be the day you'll wish you had bought the other.
 

David Kirtley

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
630
Likes
13
#8
I am also in the buy new camp. Rebuilding old machines is a labor of love. It is a hobby in itself with the side benefit of having a fine machine to use once it is complete. Yes, you might find some perfect condition old iron somewhere for a real bargain but you are much more likely to find some old "run hard and put up wet" old horse with worn ways, broken castings and gears, rust pits you can lose tools in. New machines are not perfect either. They may take a bit of work to get things set up properly to work really well but will be pretty good from the beginning.

Finding parts can be a mixed bag with new or old. Once you get everything tuned in and know how to maintain it properly, the odds of actually breaking something is pretty slim other than major accidents like getting it knocked down or something. For the most part, we are talking about maybe bushings or small parts that can be made in house. Nothing to really worry about new or old.

Personally, I have no real interest in restoring machinery and just want a machine that works.
 

Splat

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 10, 2012
Messages
1,070
Likes
138
#9
I went thru this exact dilemma myself. Find a used SB or get a new Grizzly or Precision Matthews. I won't rehash what has been written already about the old vs new argument. I will admit that my Heavy 10 was a labor of love to refurbish it to where she is now. I'm proud of all the work I did on her, but I'm a romantic and love old machinery. To me the new machines are very sterile looking, but they get the job done. I saw go with a new Grizzly or PM. If I was looking for a new lathe these days I'd get either the G4002 or G4003. It comes down to what you plan on doing with it. The G4002 is 12x24 and the G4003 is 12x36 and is $200 more. The specs are the same otherwise but the G4003 comes with 2 dead centers as opposed to the G4002's one. If I had the $ I'd get the G4003.
 

chuckorlando

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
1,631
Likes
17
#10
I would also add that buying used and restoring a machine do not at all go hand in hand. And most folks restore jobs (including my own) are heavy on the pretty and have little to do with function. It would take 30 days for a machine to rust around here. So IMO how pretty or ugly a machine is dont mean much of nothing to it's function. My rusty 59 bridgeport needed 20 dollars in shims to be at least as tight as a bench mill new. My like new asian lathe has been nothing but work trying to get it to not beat it's self to death.

I'm not sure why we think a used machine has to be restored. Just dont buy a machine thats a mess. Run it and go through the functions before you buy it. If it's junk and you buy it, well you asked for what ever head ache you get. And we got new machines on here every day with all kinda trouble. "Good" new ones at that.

If I had 3-4k cash I would buy a new import. But dont shy away from used machines cause they all need tore down and rebuilt.
 

nickmckinney

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
106
Likes
2
#12
Here is a good thread of my endeavors in learning the current new Asian lathe options:

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php?t=23470

If you are incredibly persistent and have some luck and some cash Craigslist can provide that diamond in the rough - but it might be rough going for MONTHS. I went 6 months driving both myself and da boss (aka my wife) crazy but it paid off for me in the end as I found an industrial toolroom quality lathe locally that spent a few years cutting only Delrin plastic of all things. The company that sells them has a ton in stock, parts in stock, it hasn't changed design in years, not from China, I paid about 20 cents on the dollar, blah blah blah. Basically it all depends on what you want/need and how long can you wait as many times I was frustrated enough to buy a new one on the Visa. But when its never in stock man thats a tough one for me to deal with as waiting 3-6 months is one thing but if it arrives with problems and its another possible 3-6 months to fix hell no can't deal with that.
 

12bolts

Global Moderator
Registered
Joined
Apr 23, 2011
Messages
1,967
Likes
428
#13
About the only advantage to buying secondhand is the tooling and other stuff that may be included. If your s/h machine doesnt come with a bunch of extras or is really cheap, then pass it up.

Cheers Phil
 

samthedog

Active User
Registered
Joined
Nov 21, 2012
Messages
778
Likes
299
#14
When I lived in Australia, Asian machines were all anyone had, even the big workshops. Like anything, if you spend the money you get the quality and the features.

You just need to have a clear idea of what you require of the machine. I have seen many people buy a clapped out clunker and be overjoyed with it. I have also seen the opposite, where someone always has a case of upgradeitis and sell off a wonderful pedigree machine just to have something different.

If you have the time to wait and are willing to travel, then opportunities come up. If you want to make chips instead of wait, then buy Asian. The sad truth is what we have grown up with is changing. Before our lifetime is done we will see all manufacture stop in our countries and you will ONLY be able to buy Asian. The reason it is so hard to find good American or European iron is because it has ceased to be manufactured. Get used to the idea of buying Asian or be prepared to wait, travel and spend a wad of cash.

Paul.
 

richl

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Messages
774
Likes
558
#15
I have alittle of both. Project lathes are great, just be sure you have a real lathe to play with. Buy a well supported asian machine and have a blast making chips! :-$ if something does go wrong, you want a support structure to fall back on .Rich(tired, greasy, smelly after a full day of making chips in the garage):-$
 

pdentrem

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
1,967
Likes
461
#16
About the only advantage to buying secondhand is the tooling and other stuff that may be included. If your s/h machine doesnt come with a bunch of extras or is really cheap, then pass it up.

Cheers Phil
I agree with this comment. Assuming that the machine is not clapped out and does not require a rebuild, tooling is the other major expense. Figure on as much money for tooling as for the used machine.
My first lathe was an Atlas 10F24, that came with some tooling for $1000 back around 1990. I spent about as much in buying parts to replace worn out parts and spares for the usually breaking parts. For my second lathe, a clone of the Jet BDB-1340A, it only came with what it left the factory with, but it was nearly new. No measurable wear and I had already much of the tooling at hand, from the previous 20 yrs of having the Atlas.
If I had not gotten this lathe, I was ready to go for a PM lathe or Grizzly 4002/3.
Pierre
 

LJP

Active User
Registered
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
308
Likes
11
#17
I like old machines, woodworking and metalworking. I live in the northeast and machines are easy to buy and sell here. Craigslist is a great resource IMO. I know others that don't enjoy the hunt or negotiation involved with buying a used machine, I happen to love it. As a result, I have gotten very good at it. I have bought 4 mills in the last 15 months, and sold 2 of them. Bought 2 lathes, and sold 1 of them. Each time I acquire more tooling, and I upgrade my machines. I know this is not for everyone, but I just don't see a need to buy new machines (or tooling) when I find excellent quality at 20% to 50% of what I see in catalog prices.
I recently bought $3000 worth of tooling from a guy selling off his late father-in-laws machinist tools. I easily came home with 10K to 12K worth of stuff that was all in new condition. I was a kid in a candy store! This is not the first time I have done this.
Acquiring new machines and tooling for those machines is a large part of this hobby. You simply need a lot of stuff, and it isn't cheap if all you know how to do is go to Enco's website.
There are deals out there, you need to look for them. You need to be ready to wheel and deal. You need to have cash. You need to be aggressive. The only time I buy something from the catalog sources is when I need it right now and I don't want to wait.

Or, you can pay retail for a new machine, and pay retail for all the tooling you need to make whatever you want to make, and you can get started next week.

Hope this helps, good luck! Larry
 

astjp2

Active User
Registered
Joined
Aug 23, 2013
Messages
747
Likes
84
#18
The key fact is, what are you doing with them? If you are just collecting and not building anything then its a chance you may make money on a turnover, I am never so lucky to make money, only spend it.

I like old machines, woodworking and metalworking. I live in the northeast and machines are easy to buy and sell here. Craigslist is a great resource IMO. I know others that don't enjoy the hunt or negotiation involved with buying a used machine, I happen to love it. As a result, I have gotten very good at it. I have bought 4 mills in the last 15 months, and sold 2 of them. Bought 2 lathes, and sold 1 of them. Each time I acquire more tooling, and I upgrade my machines. I know this is not for everyone, but I just don't see a need to buy new machines (or tooling) when I find excellent quality at 20% to 50% of what I see in catalog prices.
I recently bought $3000 worth of tooling from a guy selling off his late father-in-laws machinist tools. I easily came home with 10K to 12K worth of stuff that was all in new condition. I was a kid in a candy store! This is not the first time I have done this.
Acquiring new machines and tooling for those machines is a large part of this hobby. You simply need a lot of stuff, and it isn't cheap if all you know how to do is go to Enco's website.
There are deals out there, you need to look for them. You need to be ready to wheel and deal. You need to have cash. You need to be aggressive. The only time I buy something from the catalog sources is when I need it right now and I don't want to wait.

Or, you can pay retail for a new machine, and pay retail for all the tooling you need to make whatever you want to make, and you can get started next week.

Hope this helps, good luck! Larry
 

AR1911

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 5, 2010
Messages
868
Likes
99
#19
I like old machines, woodworking and metalworking. I live in the northeast and machines are easy to buy and sell here. Craigslist is a great resource IMO. I know others that don't enjoy the hunt or negotiation involved with buying a used machine, I happen to love it. As a result, I have gotten very good at it. I have bought 4 mills in the last 15 months, and sold 2 of them. Bought 2 lathes, and sold 1 of them. Each time I acquire more tooling, and I upgrade my machines. I know this is not for everyone, but I just don't see a need to buy new machines (or tooling) when I find excellent quality at 20% to 50% of what I see in catalog prices.
I recently bought $3000 worth of tooling from a guy selling off his late father-in-laws machinist tools. I easily came home with 10K to 12K worth of stuff that was all in new condition. I was a kid in a candy store! This is not the first time I have done this.
Acquiring new machines and tooling for those machines is a large part of this hobby. You simply need a lot of stuff, and it isn't cheap if all you know how to do is go to Enco's website.
There are deals out there, you need to look for them. You need to be ready to wheel and deal. You need to have cash. You need to be aggressive. The only time I buy something from the catalog sources is when I need it right now and I don't want to wait.

Or, you can pay retail for a new machine, and pay retail for all the tooling you need to make whatever you want to make, and you can get started next week.

Hope this helps, good luck! Larry
I could have written this post. I too enjoy the process. I have bought a few turkeys at first, but I rarely lost money, and I acquired a wealth of tolling


if I needed a lathe tomorrow I'd buy anew grizzly and be done with it. I use mine everyday, to repair US-made lathes and mills
 

samthedog

Active User
Registered
Joined
Nov 21, 2012
Messages
778
Likes
299
#20
I have also built my shop with second hand machines through buying, selling at a profit and keeping tooling. Here in Norway, we have access to machines from the industrial golden age and can also jump over the border to Sweden where the selection is even better. This does however take time, travel and patience and isn't everyone's cup of tea. I love it though and my wife is happy with it as she knows I always make money when I flip the item.

Paul.
 

CluelessNewB

Active Resistor
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
1,106
Likes
612
#21
I could try and convince you that older machines are better but that would only increase competition and drive the prices higher for older machines so my advice is go buy a nice new shiny ChiCom machine! :donttell:
 

dan12

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 11, 2014
Messages
69
Likes
0
#22
I could have written this post. I too enjoy the process. I have bought a few turkeys at first, but I rarely lost money, and I acquired a wealth of tolling


if I needed a lathe tomorrow I'd buy anew grizzly and be done with it. I use mine everyday, to repair US-made lathes and mills
I searched and this is what I came up with,read problems,small ones.

I got a G4003G, round $3300 shipped
found a $300 disscount code on a wood working fourm (thx to those guys!)
I have not had any problems others have had .........yet:)

it's been a great buy,I am 100%+++ happy with my purchase.
I read this forum every morning,& learn at least 1 new thing each day,it's crazy....................................
:thanks:
 

SE18

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
758
Likes
48
#23
restoring my South Bend 9A was a PITA, but learned a lot doing it. Had I been able to do it all over again however, I'd get a chinese lathe like grizzly or something new with tooling.

Also, IMO, the used lathes are way overpriced but someday I'm sure they'll come down in price.

The issue with a lot of ancient lathes (mine is 1942) is the beds were not hardened and the chuck was a screw on type.

It's nice to have an antique used during WWII so the nostalgia factor was good for me and it's become like a close friend

but still.....
 

Marco Bernardini

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
745
Likes
13
#24
There is another consideration about old lathes and, in general, about every ancient machine.
If I find a Monarch EE10, the historical and aesthetic value of it restrains me to make heavy modifications, trying to keep it in a sort of "museum state".
On a cheap Chinese machine, on the other hand, I would have no remorse to cut, drill and hack it to fit my needs (and maybe to make a fiberglass cover to have a Chinese lathe looking like a Monarch :rofl:).
 

projectnut

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 14, 2014
Messages
448
Likes
300
#25
I live in the Midwest and have been able to find quality used industrial machines to outfit my shop. I have nearly 2 dozen machines in the shop and haven't had to rebuild any of them before starting to make chips. If you look long and hard you can find quality machines for a fraction of the cost of new. The key is patience.

There are a number of used equipment dealers in the Rockford and Chicago areas of Illinois. There are also used machine dealers in Wisconsin and Michigan. They aren't the cheapest, but in most cases they have quality machines that can be powered up before shelling out any cash. Other good places to look are technical schools, high schools, and universities. I purchased Bridgeport series I machine from a local high school. It sat in storage over 10 years before it finally went up for sale. It's in excellent condition and needed only a little clean up before going to work. The University of Wisconsin system is slowly phasing out their manual machines in favor of CNC machines. I've seen a number of their machines and they look like the day they were built. The nice thing is they're going for pennies on the dollar.

I bought a surface grinder on Craigslist a few years ago and it was like new at a price I couldn't refuse. If you're persistent and look at Craigslist on a daily basis there are many bargains to be found. I was looking for a shaper a few years ago and missed over a dozen because I was browsing Craigslist on a weekly basis rather than a daily basis. A friend of mine who was looking daily happened to find one along with some other tools that came from the now defunct Badger Ordinance Depot in Baraboo WI. He wasn't interested in the shaper, but the seller would only sell the complete lot. He knew I was interested so he made the purchase. I ended up with a shaper delivered to the door that looked like it just came off the assembly line for less than $200.00.

One nice thing about the old iron is that parts and tooling are readily available at reasonable prices. The production shops either already have or are currently switching to CNC and the market is flooded with cheap quality tooling.
 

Tanshanomi

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
31
Likes
11
#26
Thanks to everyone who's shared their opinions. Thanks especially to those who took the time to share CL links. I've seen a number of those, but either they are 5+ hours drive (and $125 in gas) just to look at, or they are bigger than I can justify/dedicate space to, or I've called the seller and wasn't pleased with the conversation.

To be fair, I DID find one attractive deal locally. Last winter, there was a nicely cared-for '40s Logan 210 bench lathe with a ton of tooling and accessories for $900. Sadly, somebody else had already snapped it up by the time I got there to check it out.

My hobby is vintage motorcycles, not lathe restoration, and I can't devote the time I'd like to the one I already have. At this point, I am seriously considering a SB1001 from Grizzly (South Bend 8K). At the current closeout (approx. $2K), it's a heck of a deal, and most of the reviews say that it is more sturdy and substantially built than most new Asian lathes its size.
 

ranch23

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
322
Likes
8
#27
When I new mill shopped 7 years ago I just knew I had to own a Bridgeport. After running half worn out Bridgeports, Wells and the like for 29 years I bought a new import. Never looked back, light years ahead.
 

SE18

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
758
Likes
48
#28
Thanks to everyone who's shared their opinions. Thanks especially to those who took the time to share CL links. I've seen a number of those, but either they are 5+ hours drive (and $125 in gas) just to look at, or they are bigger than I can justify/dedicate space to, or I've called the seller and wasn't pleased with the conversation.

To be fair, I DID find one attractive deal locally. Last winter, there was a nicely cared-for '40s Logan 210 bench lathe with a ton of tooling and accessories for $900. Sadly, somebody else had already snapped it up by the time I got there to check it out.

My hobby is vintage motorcycles, not lathe restoration, and I can't devote the time I'd like to the one I already have. At this point, I am seriously considering a SB1001 from Grizzly (South Bend 8K). At the current closeout (approx. $2K), it's a heck of a deal, and most of the reviews say that it is more sturdy and substantially built than most new Asian lathes its size.
Good point, restoring machinery becomes a hobby to itself for some people. Once it's restored, some don't even use it so it stays in museum quality. They just like to bask in its glow as they admire it.

I restored a SB9A and it's all slopped with various oils from use. I even drilled holes in the cross slide for a bedair type ball turner mount. Later SBs had the holes but the older 1942 only had the dovetail hole. In short, I'm not afraid to modify it and use it b/c I think it was meant to be used.

When getting heavy machinery, I found a pickup truck I have is handy. I drove all the way from Virginia to Northern New Jersey to pick mine up.
 

Shadowdog500

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 7, 2014
Messages
339
Likes
54
#29
I agree that unless you enjoy restoring an old worn out machine, to get new.

I do have two comments on the lathe you may have selected.

If you think there is any chance that you may want to single point threads, I highly reccomend you get a lathe with a quick change gear box. My first lathe had regular change gears like the SB you listed, and after a while you look for reasons not to thread, stopping everything to mess with your change gears for 5 minutes to cut one thread only to have to spend another 5 minutes changing gears to switch back to regulat turning setup gets really old after a while.


Is that 8 by 18 going to be big enough for everything you want to do? My first lathe was a Chinese 7x12 that everyone sells. I became aware very quickly that that size lathe was limited on what I could do. Since you are working on stuff for motorcycles the size may be fine, but it is something to think about.


Post an un boxing video of whatever you get!

Chris
 

zmotorsports

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,494
Likes
894
#30
I agree that unless you enjoy restoring an old worn out machine, to get new.

I do have two comments on the lathe you may have selected.

If you think there is any chance that you may want to single point threads, I highly reccomend you get a lathe with a quick change gear box. My first lathe had regular change gears like the SB you listed, and after a while you look for reasons not to thread, stopping everything to mess with your change gears for 5 minutes to cut one thread only to have to spend another 5 minutes changing gears to switch back to regulat turning setup gets really old after a while.


Is that 8 by 18 going to be big enough for everything you want to do? My first lathe was a Chinese 7x12 that everyone sells. I became aware very quickly that that size lathe was limited on what I could do. Since you are working on stuff for motorcycles the size may be fine, but it is something to think about.


Post an un boxing video of whatever you get!

Chris
Good point right there. When I started looking to upgrade I would ONLY consider a lathe with a quick change gearbox for this very reason. Changing out gears may not seem like a big deal when looking or even at first but after a while you start to dread cutting threads and looking for other alternatives if for nothing else than to avoid the hassle and time required.

Mike.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top