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[4]

Clausing 5914 - Cracked Brake Rotor on Counter Shaft - Fixes?

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GrizzlyBagWorks

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#1
I'm getting closer and closer to getting my 5914 rebuilt and back together. I'm finishing up the countershaft rebuild/bearing replacement and have found that the "rotor" that contacts the brake shoe to stop the spindle is cracked on the back side. The crack doesn't run through to the front but it has left the face of the rotor concave.

My first choice would be a OEM replacement but I doubt I'd be able to find one and know I couldn't justify the cost from Clausing if they even had it.

I'm considering attempting a repair on this. My thought here is to V out the crack, then braze it. Throw it on a mandrel, face off maybe a 1/16" so it's flat and then use a 1/16" spacer on the backside maintain overall depth since the assembly is held in place with circlips.

Other option is to purchase a 4" cast iron round and remake the part (~$60+shipping). Do i need to worry about balancing this component, like the original, if I go this route?

Curious to hear your thoughts on this. Thanks guys!




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RandyM

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#2
The short answer is, Yes it has to be balanced, particularly if you are going to run high RPMs.

Why did you discount buying a new one before even checking it out?
 

benmychree

John York
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#3
If you make one from continuous cast iron rod, it may not need to be balanced; that breed of material is likely to be more homogenous that the original, which was likely a sand casting.
 

markba633csi

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#4
I would try to repair it, you have little to lose- afterwards you could make a home-brew balancing jig, probably get it pretty close
Mark
 
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