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Considering the G0795Z....need input.

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Dawn

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Hi all. I'm looking for a bench top mill/drill. I kind of feel that the 704/759 series may be a bit to limited in capacity. I am intrigued by the stats on the G0795Z.

Is there anyone here who has experience with this unit, or knows someone who has had....? Looking for the good and the bad.

Thanks!!
 

Ray C

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#2
Hi all. I'm looking for a bench top mill/drill. I kind of feel that the 704/759 series may be a bit to limited in capacity. I am intrigued by the stats on the G0795Z.

Is there anyone here who has experience with this unit, or knows someone who has had....? Looking for the good and the bad.

Thanks!!
Machines like this are very nice if used within their intended duty-range. If you work on appropriately-sized pieces and do not attempt to hog out large cuts, these machines will give you a lot of bang for the buck. The same (or similar) style machine is sold by many vendors with the main differences being found in the quality of the casting, quality of the motor and material the gears are made of.

A great many folks here purchase this type of equipment from Precision Matthews. He's been selling these machines for 20+ years and has the kinks worked-out to the extent possible. Search this site or the Internet and you'll find mostly good things about Matt at Precision Matthews.

Ray

EDIT: BTW... If you tell us more about the intended use of the machine, myself and others can speak more about the suitability of the machine.
 

Dawn

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EDIT: BTW... If you tell us more about the intended use of the machine, myself and others can speak more about the suitability of the machine.
Hi Ray. Thank you for your thoughts.

My intent with this machine is geared mostly toward hobby. There may end up being some commission work. I'm pretty sure most of the work intended is going to be centered on need specific projects and not multiples of sameness. So, I doubt any need for CNC. Light steel will be primary and could occasionally include aluminum.

Right now, I'm building a 'security' door from mild steel to enclose a currently unused closet. I've fabricated a sliding hinge system and many of the pieces would have been sooo much easier and quicker to make had I thought of owning a mill .....sooner. My mistake.

Thank you for the lead on Precision Matthews. I'll definitely be looking those over.
 

chips&more

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Hi and welcome. And there is the option to buy a floor model milling machine. If you have the room. And if I had the room I would not consider anyone of those bench top Import milling machines. Especially @ around $1700. And I just sold a working Bridgeport for 1200 bucks. My three cents…Dave
 

Ray C

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Hi Ray. Thank you for your thoughts.

My intent with this machine is geared mostly toward hobby. There may end up being some commission work. I'm pretty sure most of the work intended is going to be centered on need specific projects and not multiples of sameness. So, I doubt any need for CNC. Light steel will be primary and could occasionally include aluminum.

Right now, I'm building a 'security' door from mild steel to enclose a currently unused closet. I've fabricated a sliding hinge system and many of the pieces would have been sooo much easier and quicker to make had I thought of owning a mill .....sooner. My mistake.

Thank you for the lead on Precision Matthews. I'll definitely be looking those over.
''

With a machine in that size-range, a 4" vise would be the largest reasonable size. The jaws would be 4" wide and open-up 4". If you needed to hold longer pieces it's not uncommon to have 2 vises mounted on the table. The point being, the vice you use and size of mill table defines your work envelope. With mills like this, if you need to remove large amounts of metal, you can accomplish the task using a hogging bit (which are very efficient at removing stock) and making a few smaller passes. If surface finishes are needed, a face mill of 1.5 to 2" diameter is ideal. Larger size cutters will not give good results on lighter frame machines.

Machines like this are great for precise drilling and tapping with auto tappers etc...

Mild steel & aluminum... No problem.

Ray
 

Dawn

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''

With a machine in that size-range, a 4" vise would be the largest reasonable size. The jaws would be 4" wide and open-up 4". If you needed to hold longer pieces it's not uncommon to have 2 vises mounted on the table. The point being, the vice you use and size of mill table defines your work envelope. With mills like this, if you need to remove large amounts of metal, you can accomplish the task using a hogging bit (which are very efficient at removing stock) and making a few smaller passes. If surface finishes are needed, a face mill of 1.5 to 2" diameter is ideal. Larger size cutters will not give good results on lighter frame machines.

Ray
Great advice and information, Ray! Very much appreciated!
 

Dawn

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Thank you, fradish.

The PM-727V does look to have more value than what I was considering.
 

Dawn

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#9
Hi and welcome. And there is the option to buy a floor model milling machine. If you have the room. And if I had the room I would not consider anyone of those bench top Import milling machines. Especially @ around $1700. And I just sold a working Bridgeport for 1200 bucks. My three cents…Dave

Thank you! This is all kind of a new adventure for me. Soon after this purchase I'm also going to be looking at a small-ish lathe.

Unfortunately, something as big and versatile as a Bridgeport is just not going to work out for me. I've dedicated a limited amount of room in my shop for this, and since my main hobby is in woodworking and I have a really nice shop setup for that, I'll have to stick to the bench top versions....:)
 

hman

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Welcome to the forum! I do both woodwork and metalwork myself. Luckily, I just moved into a house that has a 32x48 foot shop building (now air conditioned).

Looking at the Grizzly and PM mills (neither of which I have myself), I'd go with the PM. They have a great reputation amongst forum members. Main operational difference I can see is Grizzly's auto-reverse feature, absent on the PM. It might well be handy for tapping. -but- with the DC motor, the PM should be instantly reversible. So you'd just have to pay close attention when power tapping.
 

Dawn

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Thank you, hman..!

Sounds like a pretty nice shop you have! Yes, I'm thinking the PM might be the best option for me.
 

tweinke

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I have a PM-727m, in my limited experience I think its a very nice machine. I would have gotten the 727v if it was available when I got mine just for the added speed flexibility. I can say Matt and QMT will take care of you.
 
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