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Craftsman 07301 flea market find

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FanMan

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#1
I wasn't really looking for a lathe even though I don't (didn't) have one, I've managed to turn small things on my mill... anyway I was at a flea market today with my wife, not expecting to find much, when I saw this little gem on the floor with a $100 price tag on it. Looked in good shape, asked if there were any other parts, yes, he brought out a motor and a box of accessories. Upshot is I offered him $70 and he took it and helped me carry it to the car.

IMG_20180527_145104735.jpg

I thought it was missing parts, but no:

IMG_20180527_145139946.jpg

The rust isn't bad, mostly minor surface rust, everything turns and all the slides move freely, if a bit gunked up from old oil. The cross slide crank is broken, no big deal. I haven't tried the motor yet, but that's also a minor detail, motors are plentiful. Now I just have to clean it up and build a stand for it (just what I need, another project).

I haven't figured out how to make the chuck move (Craftsman 383-22970)... anybody? The holes on the sides aren't for a square or hex key, it looks like the chuck body turns relative to the center, but try to turn it and it'll just unscrew it from the spindle (or lock it on tighter).

IMG_20180527_151418568.jpg

IMG_20180527_191944636.jpg

I'd also like to know just how old it is, is there a serial number reference anywhere? (6L 025448)
 

ELHEAD

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#2
You should be ashamed of yourself. But on the other hand I couldn't have passed it up. Great deal!
 

CluelessNewB

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#3
You should be indicted for grand larceny! :)
 

FOMOGO

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#4
Chuck operates with a pin spanner. Soak it in some kerosene, or spray it with some PB blaster. The knurled ring will rotate on the body. Nice score. Mike
Some thing like this.
 

markba633csi

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#5
Great deal, the steady rest alone is worth 2-3x what you paid
 

thomas s

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#6
Wow that was a great deal.
 

dlane

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#7
Tommy bar chuck, as Fomogo said , did you get the change gears for thread cutting? , nice score.
 

Charles Spencer

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#8
It looks like a stack of change gears in the picture.
 

machinejack

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#9
I love it when the seller is unaware of what they have. There are deals waiting around every corner. Got a"complete in the metal case" Bridgeport boring head for $50 once. But a whole lathe is a better deal. Good score got my first lathe a 9" Southbend for $45.00 when I was 15.
 

FanMan

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#10
Got the chuck unstuck and disassembled, it was just gunked up with old grease. Of course knowing what to turn relative to what helped, it's such a close fit it wasn't immediately obvious that the knurled ring was separate from the chuck body, though on reflection it's obvious that it would have to be. A bit of scotchbrite and maybe a dunk in evaporust and it'll be good as new.

Somewhere I saw a suggestion to drill holes in the chuck body so two tommy bars could be used to tighten / loosen it to avoid overtightening/loosening it on the spindle threads. Lathe newbie question: just how tight does it have to be in use?
 

Nogoingback

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#11
If you don't run in it reverse is doesn't need to be very tight at all.

GREAT score.
 

FanMan

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#12
If you don't run in it reverse is doesn't need to be very tight at all.
I don't mean the chuck on the spindle, I mean the tightening of the chuck onto the workpiece.
 

westsailpat

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#13
Nice score @FanMan if the ID tag is still on it , it's on the back side of the bed . What you have there is a Atlas MK1 6" 101.07301 , badged Craftsman .
http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman6inchmk1/ As far as it's actual date of manufacture , I don't think there is a way to tell , the 6" was made roughly 39-57 . It's predecessor (but from what I understand they were made along side each other) is the 618, it came with Timken spindle bearings , a 10tpi x 1" spindle and some other stuff . For mine I would like to get the factory stand but for right now I bought a HF stand and shortened it up .
DSCF2431
by mark westi, on Flickr
 
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wa5cab

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#14
I don't mean the chuck on the spindle, I mean the tightening of the chuck onto the workpiece.
FanMan,

As a rough rule-of-thumb, about as tight as you can get it without lengthening the arm on the spanner, using one hand.
 

34_40

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#15
That's a great piece at a great price. Congrats!
 

FanMan

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#16
if the ID tag is still on it , it's on the back side of the bed . What you have there is a Atlas MK1 6" 101.07301 , badged Craftsman .
http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman6inchmk1/ As far as it's actual date of manufacture , I don't think there is a way to tell , the 6" was made roughly 39-57 . It's predecessor (but from what I understand they were made along side each other) is the 618, it came with Timken spindle bearings , a 10tpi x 1" spindle and some other stuff . For mine I would like to get the factory stand but for right now I bought a HF stand and shortened it up .
Yes, the tag is there. Good link. The HF stand looks like a good option, though I may build a wooden stand. I'll probably sandwich a metal chip tray (an oil drip tray from the auto parts store) between the lathe and the stand like I did with my mill.

FanMan,

As a rough rule-of-thumb, about as tight as you can get it without lengthening the arm on the spanner, using one hand.
That sounds like more torque than one could oppose by holding the belts... is that within the strength of the reverse gear?
 

wa5cab

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#17
The Atlas 618 (and for a few years the 612) came out in the Summer of 1937 and was made with no significant changes except for two revisions of the Countershaft Assembly up through the Summer of 1972. The differences between it and the 101.07301 were those associated with sleeve bearings on the spindle, the spindle nose threads being 1"-8, and the 101.07301 started and ended with the second version Countershaft Assembly. From the Summer of 1957 until 618 production stopped, the 618 was also produced for Sears as the 101.21400.
 

FanMan

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#18
OK... now what about collets? I have the 3 jaw chuck, but the toolmakers at work use 5C collets for nearly everything. Can't use a 5C, of course, but I can get a set of MT2 collets and make a drawbar, or a set of ER collets with the MT2 shank for twice the money but a slightly wider range of sizes... but either way the solid 3/8-16 drawbar means I still couldn't turn the end of a long piece of stock extending through the spindle. I guess that's just the way it is with these small lathes?
 

westsailpat

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#20
I did the MT2 set up it was cheap and easy . Only problem is that the MT2 collet won't go all the way in the spindle . The factory way was to use a sleeve in the spindle that excepts a 3c collet . With that set up you have a thru hole spindle . Here are the goodies that Atlas offered .
http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas-6-inch-lathe-accessories/
 
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FanMan

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#21
I did the MT2 set up it was cheap and easy . Only problem is that the MT2 collet won't go all the way in the spindle . The factory way was to use a sleeve in the spindle that excepts a 3c collet . With that set up you have a thru hole spindle . Here are the goodies that Atlas offered .
http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas-6-inch-lathe-accessories/
Ah, the sleeve makes sense, then you're just pulling on the 3C collet's external threads with the hollow drawbar. Looks like LMS sells a similar drawtube, but only for MT3, not MT2. :(
 

westsailpat

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#22

westsailpat

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#23
One thing that our 6's' like is a proper fit on the spindle bushings . I recently just put in new but it did no good because my spindle is worn about .006 . Thanks to Robert I know the proper way is to install new bushings and the clamp holds them into place . This was not going to work for me so the fix was to split the bush on one side and over tighten , just a little . It worked . I'm looking for a new spindle.
Here is a handy vid that shows the tear down (it's easy). http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/atlas/spindle/spindle.html
 
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FanMan

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#24
OK, another thing... where do you find the recommended 20 weight oil?

Edit: looks like the Mobil DTE Heavy Medium I use in my mill is ISO 68, which is equivalent to SAE 20, so I should be good.
 

wa5cab

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#25
FanMan,

Yes, the Mobile DTE Heavy Medium works well. I've been using it for the past five or six years. Also, about once a year, check the usual suppliers around town. SAE 20 ND turns up now and then. For example, several years ago, Tractor Supply didn't carry it. Then about two years ago, they did. The Mobile is just as good, but it isn't carried locally last time that I checked so to the cost of the oil had to be added the cost of shipping.
 

wa5cab

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#26
With regard to collets, first the proper name for the internally threaded tube used to close most common collets is "Draw Tube", not "Drawbar" and not "Sleeve". Second, the collets that Atlas actually advertised were 3AT and a smaller but similar one that I have seen referred to as 1AT but I think 1AT is something else. At least according to at least one dimension chart that I have. Atlas apparently would also supply 3C collets (the threads are near enough to the same to be functionally interchangable) but 3C and 3AT are not otherwise interchangable - significantly different compression angle and collet length. So they take different draw tube lengths and closer-adapters. And neither 3C nor 3AT will even come close to fitting a 6" because the collets themselves are already much larger than the spindle bore or 2MT taper. They are only usable in 10" and 12" lathes. The largest workpiece that could be handled by the Atlas collets that fit the 6" is about 0.281". So unless you had a lot of work smaller than that, the best choices are 2MT for short workpieces (but only in 1/16" increments) or ER25 using a collet chuck that screws onto the spindle nose threads instead of being mounted on a 2MT drawbar type arbor.
 

FanMan

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#27
Thanks Robert, that explains it nicely. Sounds like the ER25 would be the way to go. Do you know if anybody actually makes the ER25 chuck you describe (that screws onto the nose threads)?

The DTE sounds like the way to go. Where I work they buy it in 55 gallon drums.

The ways cleaned up nicely with some Evaporust soaked paper towels, it was only very light surface rust. Other than the chuck, which I will finish cleaning tonight, everything else is nice and shiny. It looks like this lathe was well taken care of by somebody who knew what he was doing but didn't use it much, and didn't sit for long after that, probably an estate sale. When I pulled the carriage off there there were copper chips under it, makes me think of the armature repair kit but there was no such kit included with it.
 

pontiac428

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#29
I think the Morse taper ER collet holder with a drawbar is a great setup at a far lower cost than scrounging together the equivalent spindle collets. I just finished setting up my 10" with ER32 collet holders on both ends, and am very happy with them.

Great steal on the lathe, you really scored on that deal.
 

FanMan

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#30
I think the Morse taper ER collet holder with a drawbar is a great setup at a far lower cost than scrounging together the equivalent spindle collets. I just finished setting up my 10" with ER32 collet holders on both ends, and am very happy with them.
With the MT holder and drawbar you can't turn long pieces extending through the headstock. With the threaded on ER collet holder you can. Though a MT collet might be more accurate than the threaded adapter for diameters too large to run through the spindle anyway.
 
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