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Found a neat Safety Manual published in 1929 by Western Electric Company.

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jbmauser

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Pages of photos of the correct way to run machines and handle heavy stock and basically an all round safety manual. Even has a picture of the hospital they will send you to if need be. At the end of the book after a lengthy discourse on personal Hygiene they held forth with the rules to success. I wonder if Tony Robbins found a copy of this book. d (1 of 1).jpg
 

bhigdog

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Western Electric was part of the Bell System, it was called "Ma Bell" for good reason. My dad started with them in Kearny, NJ during the war. Worked there until he retired. He got me, my sister and about a dozen uncles in. Back then W.E. was truly like a family. The company encouraged family 's to join them. It was near impossible to get laid off. Ma Bell would rather have you sweep floors or paint machinery until the slack picked up rather than let you go.
The Kearny works was a wonder sprawling over 145 acres and many buildings. W.E. made EVERYTHING they needed including nuts and bolts and even light bulbs. Wondering around the various buildings you could see every industrial process you could imagine from phone booths being made from the finest hardwoods to wire being drawn, insulated, spun into cables and being cased in a lead sheath. The lead came from Nassau Smelting, owed by W.E. There were rows upon rows upon rows of punch presses stamping out and or forming every part W.E. needed. Automatic screw machines endlessly spitting out parts. Ear splitting cold headers forming screw and bolt heads........It was like Disney Land to me...................Bob
 
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boostin53

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Western Electric was part of the Bell System, it was called "Ma Bell" for good reason. My dad started with them in Kearny, NJ during the war. Worked there until he retired. He got me, my sister and about a dozen uncles in. Back then W.E. was truly like a family. The company encouraged family 's to join them. It was near impossible to get laid off. Ma Bell would rather have you sweep floors or paint machinery until the slack picked up rather than let you go.
The Kearny works was a wonder sprawling over 145 acres and many buildings. W.E. made EVERYTHING they needed including nuts and bolts and even light bulbs. Wondering around the various buildings you could see every industrial process you could imagine from phone booths being made from the finest hardwoods to wire being drawn, insulated, spun into cables and being cased in a lead sheath. The lead came from Nassau Smelting, owed by W.E. There were rows upon rows upon rows of punch presses stamping out and or forming every part W.E. needed. Automatic screw machines endlessly spitting out parts. Ear splitting cold headers forming screw and bolt heads........It was like Disney Land to me...................Bob
It's a shame there aren't many, if any, places like this anymore.
 

jbmauser

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Well Bob, you could tell by the tone of this safety manual that they cared for the safety of their people and discouraged cutting corners etc adding risk to machine operation. Take the time to set it up right.
 
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