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Gits oiler, how to remove it?

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Redmech

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I'm tearing the head of my South Bend 10L down. I removed the Gits oiler from the left side for the spindle bearing, but the right side, it will not unscrew cause the upper portion and lid of the oiler hits the cast portion of the head. Has anyone else ran into this problem, I'm sure it's something simple.
 

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Bob Korves

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Most, but not all Gits oilers are pressed in, not screwed in. However, some are screwed in. You should be able to tell by looking carefully at the oiler where it goes into the casting. The press in oilers are often not removable without destroying them. Installing them can also destroy them. I use an accurate fitting wood dowel installed into the opening with the lid held open and out of the way and then drive them in. 90 degree versions need a U shaped driver that fits the contour of the oiler if rounded opposite the neck, or a flat one if flat. The screw in ones need to be unscrewed to remove. Try to save and reuse them, they are getting more expensive and lower quality with time, IMO. A lot of sizes and styles have been discontinued with no similar replacements currently available new.
 

Redmech

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@Bob Korves thanks, that must be what this is, I think I will paint around this one. It's still functions fine. I saw a thread recently where this subject came up, but it didn't apply to me at the time so I didn't pay any attention to it. Now I can't find that thread.
 

westsailpat

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I'm starting to replace mine , straight ones not 90*s . They were broken , lids were gone I thought they would pull out easy " wrong" . Finally got one out by clamping it with a Vise-Grip putting a c-clamp on the Vice-Grip and then tapping out . The other one the whole thing tore off flush I was able to tap it to the center with a brad set and then pull it out with needle nose pliers . I got my re placements here . http://www.ebay.com/itm/122381334904?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT
One other thing the replacements are .317 and the hole is .300 so I plan on taking down the Gits to about .302 .
 

Bob Korves

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One other thing the replacements are .317 and the hole is .300 so I plan on taking down the Gits to about .302 .
Turning a Gits oiler down, by .015" no less, will not be easy and will not leave much if any wall thickness. They will likely collapse during installation. I think I would drill the holes to 5/16" (.3125"), and then ream them to around .315-.316". You do not want a lot of press fit, as the metal is already quite thin and will buckle as you drive in the oilers. Make sure to double check those dimensions. If they are genuine Gits oilers, the specs. are available by part number online.
 

woodtickgreg

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If it is not hitting by much you can also use a dremmel and grind away a little of the headstock casting and blend it in with the dremmel. There is a lot of material on the casting and after it is painted it will not be noticeable or weaken the casting in any way.
 

rgray

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It had to have been installed. So I'm thinking it press fits into the threaded piece. 2 pieces.
You might be right about leaving it alone and painting around it though to avoid damaging it.
 

WCraig

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Old thread, I know, but I had the same problem. My replacement Gits oiler was too big for the existing hole in the casting. Hard to get a precise measurement as the oiler is tapered but mine were 10-11 thous too large for the hole.

I was thinking I needed to make some kind of mandrel to turn the oiler down to size. It was looking like a major project for a $4 part! I then measured the inside diameter of the oiler and had a bit of a brain wave. (Perhaps I should have sat down and let it pass!) The ID was almost exactly the same as the size of a "A" letter drill: 0.234". I 'secured' the oiler to the drill with a bit of masking tape and chucked it in my drill press:


Atlas618_gits_oiler_shave
by Craig T, on Flickr

I used a 1/4" triangular file so I could see what I was doing. Checking often a calliper, I snuck up on size while trying to keep a bit of taper from top to bottom. The masking tape worked surprisingly well--no slippage. Best of all, the oilers are now a nice push fit.

Craig
 

Janderso

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The apron on my south bend was missing the Oiler that has the extension.
I decided to solder a tube on to make the extension.
Don’t try it, the Git’s Oiler was there one second then it was a puddle the next.
I think I used a press fit and J-B weld.
 
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westsailpat

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Sit down and let that thought pass . OK , that was funny .
 

Bob Korves

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The apron on my south bend was missing the Oiler that has the extension.
I decided to solder a tube on to make the extension.
Don’t try it, the Git’s Oiler was there one second then it was a puddle the next.
I think I used a press fit and J-B weld.
Gits oilers are not now the same quality they used to be. I try to keep the ones I have in good condition, and don't tweak the hinges. As long as the lid still covers the hole properly, I keep on using them. Even after 70 years, they still do now what they did then. They are easy to remove from machines, just not in any condition for reuse.
 
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