[4]

Hand Tapper Restoration

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#1
I bought this hand tapper on eBay



It ended up being a lot rougher than I thought from the pictures. It had already been cleaned up to a cosmetic extent. The tap adapters were corroded to the point that the set screws would not come out and the taps were also solidly corroded in place. I put them in Kroil overnight and then tried without success. Finally I pulled out the old propane torch and heated. That actually worked quite nicely! I got the set screws out and drove out the taps with a punch.

Everything then got a bath in Evoporust. After some sandblasting and paint; here we are:







This model is a 10S. For some reason it does not have the slot in the base for a work clamp. I have seen others that did. Does any one have one of these? I also have a question about the counter weight arm bearing. If anyone is familiar with these machines please respond!

Robert
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#2
Hello Robert,

You have done a nice job on that Lassy hand tapping machine. :encourage::encourage::encourage:

The idea behind the counterweight is that it will automatically lift the tap out on the last turn of the thread rather than you having to pull it out and breaking the last thread edge. Only really useful when tapping small holes with fine threads.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#3
Shiny new tap adapters:



This did not come with metric tap holders. I guess I will be making some. That piece of 12L14 in the back of pic looks suspiciously idle. I also need to replace the cracked wood holder. I have some teak that might work well.

Robert
 
Last edited:

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#4
Hello Robert,

You have done a nice job on that Lassy hand tapping machine. :encourage::encourage::encourage:

The idea behind the counterweight is that it will automatically lift the tap out on the last turn of the thread rather than you having to pull it out and breaking the last thread edge. Only really useful when tapping small holes with fine threads.
My question about the counterweight arm relates to the disc on the end that rides under the shaft collar around the main shaft. On my machine this is fixed and does not turn as you rotate the handle. I am wondering if it has seized up and is intended to rotate? I am considering replacing it with a bearing but I would like to know the intended design.

This piece:



Robert
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#5
Hi Robert,

I don't recall whether it rotated or not ! I think it may have done. You can get a clue by examining the underside of the collar for rubbing and removing the screw and seeing if it has a shoulder on it.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#6
Thanks. There is no set screw. It seems to be riveted in place. There are rub marks on the collar but no flat worn on the disc at the end of the arm. This leads me to believe it should rotate. I think I will remove it and replace it with a bearing.
Robert
 

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Commercial Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Commercial Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
2,356
Likes
2,312
#7
Hey Robert,

I have a hand tapper. It is just an inexpensive Phase II. I mounted mine directly to my milling machine base. I got tired of having to clamp it to my bench to use it. I also made a fancy tapping fluid cup to catch the run-off. Mine also has the slotted base for the clamp. I like it, I use it all the time.

Tapper 1.JPG Tapper 2.JPG Tapper_Cup.JPG Tapper_Mount-1.JPG Tapper_Mount-2.JPG
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#8
Hi Robert, Randy, Two replies :D

I'm surprised that it seems to be riveted in place, I thought that it was a screw securing the roller. Logically if it wasn't designed to rotate, why bother with a disc, it could just as easily be a lip on the end. The shaft can't rotate because it has a pivot pin through it.
So yes if it has seized, stick a small bearing race on the end.

Hi Randy,

I like the way you have set that tapper up, certainly makes it very convenient to use. I have to dig mine out every time I need it, its very heavy.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#9
Randy-very nice setup! Does yours have a disc that rolls where the lever arm meets the shaft? I may go ahead and mill a slot in my base to make a clamp.
Robert

Edit: I messed with my counterweight shaft. The disc on the end is supposed to rotate. It was frozen. I was able to get it working with a little Kroil.
Robert
 
Last edited:

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#10
Started on the metric tap adapters:





The originals have a square broached portion of the thru hole near the middle of the part. I have no way to do that. My plan is to cross drill and thread the hole. Then introduce a set screw from each side so that they engage opposing flats of the tap shank. One on each side should retain the tap and prevent rotation. Any thoughts on this? The originals are hardened but I don't think that is really necessary?

Robert
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#11
Hi Robert,

Nice ! Yes cross drilling and a pair of grub screws will work nicely.

Thanks for the update on that little disc.
 

Grandpop

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jan 20, 2016
Messages
78
Likes
75
#12
I have same Phase II unit. I typically use a 4" drill press vise to hold the detail being tapped, so was always running out of vertical height and was hard to keep the vise on the narrow table. I bought a 12 x 16 3/8 think plate and screwed it down to the base. Made a 3.5" rectangular riser block to make the arm higher. Works perfect for me now, really like it.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#13
One other thought was to cross drill 2 orthogonal holes and then set pins into them (possibly hardened) and solder in place. The ends of the 4 pins would create the square. The outside could be turned or ground smooth. I think this would work great but seems too complicated.
If my set screws come loose I could always go back and silver solder them in place once I get the depth right.
I am thinking about using a low profile drill vise. Not sure my mini mill is up to the task of machining a long groove in cast iron. I suppose I could send it out.
Robert
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#14
Hi Robert,

Cast iron is easy to mill ! Use a slot drill a mm or so smaller so you can clean the slot width up later. Take material out in say half or 1 mm steps.
The only caveat is that sometimes an un-machined surface can have a very hard skin.

The trick here is to make the cut depth deeper than the skin. The same applies the other way, you will be cutting down to a hard skin. So the last cut needs to get below it. What I have just said assumes that you will start cutting from the already machined side of the base. Also remember that the edges will have a very hard skin, since they are un-machined.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#15
Thanks Barron. Maybe I will give it a try. By a "slot drill" I assume you mean and end mill?

OK, COLOR ME EMBARRASSED! I just found out that metric and SAE taps use the same shank diameter so metric adapters are unnecessary. The 6mm=1/4", the 5mm=#10, the 4mm = #8. Duh. I'm glad I did not finish all 3!

That's ok though. It gives me time to start on my next project. I am making a metric adapter for my SAE Vise Grips.

Robert
 
Last edited:

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#16
Hi Robert,

Don't be embarrassed about making a mistake ! It is how we learn some things :)
Anyway I have several taps that have the same shank diameter and quite different sizes across the flats. Making a collet with a pair of opposing grub screws would allow for that.

DSCF0511.JPG DSCF0512.JPG

This is my tapping stand. The base is a cast iron barbell weight, I forget how much it weighed. I turned all the lettering off on both sides, which nicely reduced it to 1" inch thick.

The upright is a 13" inch length of silver steel (drill rod) 20 mm in diameter. I used a short length of silver steel with a scallop cut in it, drilled right through 5 mm (tapping size for M6) and then cut it in half through the scallop. I threaded one end M6 and clearance drilled the other half. I used an M6 cap screw with a brass collar and pressed a plastic bottle cap over it to make the knob.

The tap holder is a Moore & Wright long series one supported in a brass split bush. The arm is a length of 1" X 1/8" wall aluminum tube. The round piece at the end is a removable tapping block. As I said earlier Its heavy.
 

jdedmon91

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2017
Messages
341
Likes
626
#17
I have one made out of a old drill stand. Here is one of the videos I made about mine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#18
Hi Jim, Thank you for posting the video.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#19


R
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#20
Hi Robert,

Very nice indeed. Well presented.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#21
Thank you.
I feel like building a hand tapper would be a great beginner project. It teaches you about bushings with interference fit and other skills. Not too expensive to make. It is a very useful tool to have. I have thought about making a casting for the arm in aluminum. It does not really need to be cast iron. The only issue is I think you really must have a mill to do it right.
Robert
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Likes
335
#22
Hi Robert,

I'm sure that you have seen the pictures of mine. Whilst having a mill is useful, you could do everything on the lathe. The hardest part for me was turning the bar bell weight, even then I could have just drilled a hole to suit the length of 20 mm drill rod and super glued or used Locktite to fix it in place. A simple clamp screw could have been used instead of the split clamp that I used to adjust and secure the arm. But again that was done on the lathe.

I used a Starret long series tap wrench simply because I had one. The same with the length of square aluminum tube. It could have been any piece of material that was to hand. That tapping block at the front was a scrap off cut of aluminum bar. Actually a piece from the same bit of bar that I've just made my wax chuck from.

Look at the materials that you have got to hand ! There is all sorts of useful hiding inside.

EDIT: I've just realised I didn't answer your question about slot drills and end mills. A slot drill has two or three flutes and is intended to cut a slot or groove, whilst an end mill may have six flutes and is center cutting, intended to be plunged into the work like a drill. Though today those differences are blurred, both often being used interchangeably.
 
Last edited:

markba633csi

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,985
Likes
1,545
#23
Hi Robert- what's that black metallic primer in post #3 ?
Is that Rustoleum? Looks nice
Mark
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,465
Likes
1,671
#24
Hi Robert- what's that black metallic primer in post #3 ?
Is that Rustoleum? Looks nice
Mark
I used Rustoleum Black Stainless Steel. It's darker than I hoped but I'm glad you like it.
Robert
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top