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Huanyang Vfd On A Bridgeport Clone

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aeroHAWK

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#1
Since I got my Bridgeport BOSS3 CNC retrofitted with MACH3, I use my manual mill very little. I recently noticed the noise and vibration in the vari-speed head (of the manual mill) was getting worse. I suspected that the lack of use had put a "set" in the shape of the belt. But it was now getting so bad it affected the surface finish of the part, and was unusable. Even though I use it less, when I do need it, I NEED IT!

Upon disassembly, I found that the belt was trashed. Yes, it had taken a "set", and this weakened the belt in the curved area and it was now breaking up.

I had been planning on getting rid of the mechanical vari-speed drive and replacing it with an electronic Variable Frequency Drive. So I figured this was a good time. This meant I needed to remove all the monkey motion pulleys and springs and replace that with a micro-v belt and pulleys.

I had some parts from an old job that only needed slight modification for the pulleys. I needed to cut the micro-v profile and machine a tapered hole in the center (I made a "taper-lock" hub to mount them to the shafts). Here is what the pulleys look like when finished:
pulley.png

A year or so ago, I wanted to learn to program AVR microprocessers, so I made a digital tachometer as an exercise to learn with. My plan is to replace the front cover of the vari-speed drive (where the RPM is displayed in the little window) with the tachometer and a slide pot for changing speed, like this:
cover.png
The tapered hub has a flange for tightening with a series of screws around the perimeter. I put a piece of brass shim stock between the tapers to keep them from galling. I also used an indicator to make sure the pulley was not wobbling as it rotated. Tightening the screws the appropriate way would make the pulley tilt slightly, so I used that to make sure it ran true. The tachometer counts the windows in a disk and you can see that disk on the pulley here:
pulley-mnt.png

This is the head reassembled without the front cover:
pulley-mill.png

Here you can see into the front where the cover will be. The belt is visible as well as the tachometer disk. An opto-interrupter will be mounted in here to count the windows:
pulley-frnt.png

The mill runs SOOO much smoother and quieter! I wish I did this years ago!

Next I will post the setup of the VFD and the remote on/off switch, etc.
 
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JimDawson

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#2
Are you going to use 2 opto interrupters to get a 2 channel quadrature output to detect direction as well as speed?
 

aeroHAWK

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#3
Are you going to use 2 opto interrupters to get a 2 channel quadrature output to detect direction as well as speed?
Nope. It's just a simple pulse - it sees both rising and falling edges to require fewer windows.

I don't know why I need an instrument to tell me forward/reverse, I can look at the spindle just as easily as a gauge. I may not have been clear when mentioning my BOSS3 CNC... this VFD is on my manual mill.
 

aeroHAWK

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#4
I found this post from johnnyc14 that helped me get my head around getting the VFD to work:

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/thre...-volt-single-phase-to-220-volt-3-phase.33103/

He did a good job explaining things. I was then able to adapt things to the way I wanted.

I wanted to make the VFD work just like things worked before I installed it. I've run a Bridgeport for more than 30 years and I didn't want to have to re-learn the on/off switch - especially when I need to shut it down IMMEDIATELY. Plus I want to have the capability to power tap like always - and not have to think about how to stop and reverse the spindle quickly. My switch looks like this:
switch.png

So I need the VFD to run in FWD when the switch is rotated CCW and stop when the switch is horizontal, then REV when the switch is rotated CW (this is assuming high gear). The problem I found is that the VFD didn't seem to have a way to do that. My challenge was to find a trick to make it work like I want. This is what the manual showed for examples:
wiring.png
The example on the left is set up for three momentary contact switches. The example on the right uses two switches, K1 turns on the spindle, and K2 determines the direction.

I had the idea to set up the mill's drum switch to close K1 for forward and to close both K1 and K2 for reverse. IT WORKS!:D

More to come....

(edited to correct error in whether or not it worked - I originally posted it didn't, but I didn't set it up correctly)
 
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aeroHAWK

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#5
This is a wiring diagram of my setup:
Huanyang schematic mod.png

Here is a list of the settings I am using:

- PD001 set to 1 Enable external controls (FWD, REV, etc.)

- PD002 set to 1 Enable external RPM control using 10k pot (I haven't yet connected the pot so, my VFD is still set to 00)

- PD003 set to 60 Main Frequency - Will change with up/dn (or 10k pot if enabled) arrows during motor operation

- PD004 set to 60 Base Frequency - from motor name plate

- PD005 set to 117.63 Maximum Operating Frequency (This provides exactly 3500 RPM on my mill)

- PD008 set to 240 Maximum Voltage - from motor name plate

- PD011 set to 13.5 Minimum Operating Frequency (This provides 406 RPM on my mill)

- PD014 set to 1.5 Acceleration time (seconds)

- PD015 set to 8.7 Deceleration time (seconds)

- PD041 set to 10 Carrier Frequency (Factory default is 1 mHz and there is a noticeable whine when the motor turns. I set mine to 10 mHz and it is now silent)

- PD044 set to 01 Set Function of FOR (D1) Terminal (per example in manual page 37)

- PD045 set to 05 Set Function of REV (D2) Terminal (per example in manual page 37)

I haven't yet tried using a breaking resistor, but plan to soon. I'm a little confused because the schematic shows the resistor connected to terminals labeled "P" and "N", but there are no such labels on my VFD.
 
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aeroHAWK

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#6
GOOD NEWS! I found this schematic online. It shows the Braking Resistor connections labeled with nomenclature that actually matches labels on the drive! The resistor is attached to the "P" and "Pr" terminals. It is what I suspected, but it is nice to get some conformation....
b r wiring.png
 

aeroHAWK

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#7
BAD NEWS!:confused::(

Apparently there is a reason these VFDs are so cheap. :mad: I found that the support circuitry for the Breaking Resistor ISN'T EVEN INSTALLED on the PC Board! :cry: So a Breaking Resistor is out of the question. :eek:

I have therefore opted for the "Coast to a Stop" option, and will use the hand operated mechanical break that I've used for years....
 

aeroHAWK

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#8
Here are some pictures of what I've done so far. It is a temporary setup to get it working the way I want. Next I'll redo the wiring with strain reliefs and shielding. Plus, I'll install an On/Off switch - currently I'm using the wall plug....

VFD wired.png

drum switch.png

terminals.png

overview.png
 

mksj

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#9
There was a previous post about the braking module not being installed in an older version of this VFD. But, I have used this brand of VFD and the braking unit worked. If I recall I used a 70 ohm 250W braking resistor and was able to brake a lathe in a 1-2 second range. It also has some internal braking ability without the external braking resistor, but I have heard they are prone to being damaged if too aggressive braking is used without an external resistor. Try something like 3 seconds and see if it works. If it does add an external braking resistor as added long term insurance, they are around $20 for the encapsulated aluminum ones. It connects to terminals 4 (P+) and 5 (PR). Build http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/acer-trump-1236-vfd-conversion.32910/
 
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aeroHAWK

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#10
Mark,

THANKS! That link is informative. You seem to have a good understanding of the workings of VFDs.

I experimented with deceleration times with my setup. The best braking I got was 5.7 seconds decel from 3500 RPM. Then when I tried it a little later I needed to raise it to 5.8 seconds - I guess I was on the ragged edge.;)

I have a resistor but didn't install it after finding several posts indicating many of these VFDs (especially from eBay) don't have the on-board circuitry. The big indicator that there is no circuitry is a missing red wire that can be seen behind the I/O terminal blocks. There are three red wires visible for the three motor phases (connecting to U, V, W) shown here, but there should be a fourth wire connected to P+ but it is missing: here: missing wire.png

I looked through the photos on the link you posted and could not see if any showed the wire, missing or not. My thinking here is, maybe that wire isn't required on some models. But it is suspicious that I can clearly see a PC Board trace with a hole for a wire, and the wire is obviously missing....:confused:

Mark, do you have a way of confirming whether or not that wire is in the drive you used?

As of now, I have a satisfactory solution. The mill behaves exactly as it did before the VFD installation, only smoother and quieter.;) However it would be nice to have the option of a braking resistor.
 
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mksj

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#11
The build was for another forum member (but it looked just like yours in the connections, see picture), I mostly use the Hitachi VFD units. Not a big fan of Huanyang VFDs because of reported reliability/programming issues, the power terminals are undersized for their load rating.... There is no harm in attaching the braking resistor since you have it and see if you can dial down the braking time. You would get an over voltage error if you push the time down too low. A mill is not as critical as a lathe, so you can live with a 5-6 second stop time. There is no real point in using extreme braking times in normal use, as it does put more stress on the motor and drive train. You can program an E-Stop (or safety brake switch) in some units to change the braking time, i.e. run 2 stage normally and switch to 1 stage for emergency braking.

VFD wiring.jpg
 

aeroHAWK

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#12
There are extensive posts available online with schematics and modifications to provide the circuitry when missing. It is compelling information. My PC Board matches what is being reported.:confused:

mksj, after your earlier post, I attached the resistor I have... and lo-and-behold... NO DIFFERENCE! :mad: Unless there is something I'm missing in the setup, all indications are that there is no Braking Resistor support.

I have a suspition that the VFD in the image above is the same. :eek:
 

mksj

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#13
Might be various models, definitely was working on the one I installed (2 second stop on a lathe), but I have also read the treads the Huanyang VFD may be missing the external braking components. There are other brands of VFDs that this is also the case, like some versions of the Teco's, KB electronics, etc. I would contact the vendor that sold it to you and see what they say, or if it can be returned. Sorry, but the Huanyang VFDs leave a real bad taste in my mouth, and I question their long term reliability, but others report they are fine, so YMMV.

Anyway, attached is the PDF parameter file and changes that I used for a 2HP motor. I would check PD029-PD033 values.
 

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aeroHAWK

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#14
Thanks Mark,

The parameter file will be very useful. :) I could contact the vendor, but since I got it on eBay, they probably won't have much useful information. I'll give it a try though.... :confused:

I understand the "bad taste", I concur. I have other brand VFDs and I got them before I knew much about them. Some have the capability of braking resistors, others don't. Fortunately, I don't need to have anything different than what I have working now.

The only reason for having an aggressive decel is for power tapping. It is done at relatively low RPM, so even without a resistor it is satisfactory. But I actually prefer coasting to a stop and using the manually operated mechanical brake in the head. It's how I've been using a Bridgeport for over 30 years....;)

I have a Bridgeport BOSS3 CNC that I plan to put one of my VFDs on. That one also won't support a braking resistor (but at least they don't lead yo to believe otherwise), but I can set it up to coast to stop and I can actuate a brake with the CNC control (if necessary).
 

aeroHAWK

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#15
After getting the VFD working essentially the way I want, I noticed that at certain RPMs there is vibration that I don't like.

So I got an idea.... :rolleyes: If only I could find a way to know the relation of out-of-balance to the rotational position - you know, like a timing light, I could then drill holes in the heavy side and bring the spindle closer to balance. What I came up with is, if I could use the motion of the vibration to close a switch (or something similar), that would light an LED and shine it on the brake drum below the micro-v pulley I made. I can put marks on the casting to help locate the position of the out-of-balance. To get more motion from the vibration, I extended the quill and clamped a section of aluminum channel to it to extend the "lever arm" as far as possible, like this:
balance.png

I put a piece of solid wire in the vice as a contact point:
contact.png

I used clip leads to connect a 9 volt battery to the contact wire and a superbright LED (a current limiting resistor is already installed under the heat shrink):
LED.png

I then cut pieces of masking tape to make indexing marks around the perimeter of the brake drum. Then I turned on the spindle and adjusted the RPM to find a resonate frequency of the milling head so it would shake as much as possible, and played with the contact gap while shining the LED on the marks:
drill.png

I then drilled holes in the thick part of the casting to lighten the heavy side of the drum. I experimented with turning the spindle forward and reverse, and then split the difference between the readings (apparently there is some kind of phase shift with the setup). The amount of wobble at the contact point is only a few tenths on a thousandth of an inch. I fount that I could push at the top of the head to delicately influence the gap and adjust the duty cycle of the LED. There is a balance of the brightness of the LED vs. the accuracy of the indication, depending upon how much of a rotation the LED is lit.

After a couple of hours of messing around, I balanced the spindle the best I could within the limitations of the setup. And it made a BIG difference. The spindle is SOOOO much smoother!:applause 2:
 
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JimDawson

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#16
I think that is one of the most interesting balance setups I have ever seen. Good thinking! :encourage:
 

aeroHAWK

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#17
Thanks Jim,

It leaves a lot to be desired, but it did the job....:)
 

aeroHAWK

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#18
So I am now "cleaning up" the wiring. I don't like the way the high voltage wires are just hanging, so I looked for a way to cover them up.

Before:
b4.png

After:
conduit.png

I started with this...
Image1.png

And modified it...
Image2.png
Image3.png

I drilled two holes in the case and epoxied nuts inside. Here you can see them holding the cover.
conduit+.png
 

aeroHAWK

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#19
This morning I added a junction box with a power switch (so I don't have to keep plugging and unplugging) to the wiring. The box will also include the 5 volts required for the tachometer that I'll be adding (it has the strain relief on the top of the box but no wire yet).
Image2.png

The power switch is on the back of the box to keep it away from swarf. I mounted the box on standoffs so that swarf would be less likely to pile up between it and the machine. It turned out to be good for the clearance of the power chord out the bottom. The box was something I had lying around, and it had some holes in it already, and the hole in the bottom was one.

Here is a wider view, you can see the hole in the front of the head where the mechanical speed change crank used to be. I'll be putting a cover on it with the tachometer:
Image1.png
 

JimDawson

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#20
Nice looking install. !
 
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#21
Nice install. But I see a problem.

How are you going to tilt your head without some slack in your wiring? Or did I miss something?
 

aeroHAWK

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That's a very good question Ken. ;) I noticed the same thing a few days ago.... :confused:

A couple of comments... first, I have been in this trade for more than 35 years, and the last time I needed to tilt the head was probably 30 years ago (that's assuming I ever did - I don't remember). :eek: And second, if I need to tilt the head sometime in my lifetime, I'll spend the extra few minutes it would take to install a longer wire (or maybe just unbolt the junction box temporarily).

I don't see it ever being an issue. ;)
 
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#23
Me too! In the past 30 plus years, I've only needed to tilt the head once that i can recall, too! Had to re-cut a angled flat on the bottom of a tailstock base to clean it up from years of wear and abuse the old lathe had been through. Any other time I've needed to cut anything angular I have a tilting RT and all angle vise I use.

Didn't mean to hijack your thread, but I'm fixing to install two of these VFD's I've bought on a couple of lathes I have. I like some of your neat ways of "hiding" the wiring. I'll have to keep that in mind when installing the VFD's. Thanks for sharing!
 

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#24
I tilted my head a year or two ago and after I got it realigned I swore I'd never move it again. Beautiful job on the work that was done.
 

Smokey Joel 3355

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#25
Hello all. My name is Smokeyjoel3355. I have a machine shop behind my house this I use for equipment and pleasure. I am a Retired Tennessee State Trooper, so I went to school to be a Machinist after I retired. I really like making parts for my equipment, machines, and to help friends and family. I do not know how to join in with you all so any advise on adding comments and photos would be appreciated.
I am at present adding a Huanyang vfd to my Grizzly 3616 mill and my 10 in x 38 in. Clausing lathe. I have been trying to find help with the programming of the vfd and push button station. I have wired my vfd power and ran shielded control wire to my mill. I made my shield wire cable by wrapping copper tape around the length of thermostat cable. I have also run the shield cable through a water tight cable from the 4 button station to the Huanyang vfd. The 4 button station is mounted to the side of my mill head. (I don't know how to add photos yet to show you all my setup.)
I think my station is wired correctly but I do not know how to wire and program the control wiring for the vfd. The buttons on the station are START,STOP, 2 single buttons with NO AND NC contractors. FOWARD, REVERSE, is one button with foward NO contactor one side and reverse NC contactor on the other side . THE POTENTIOMETER is a 3 pole.

Again any help would be much appreciated.

Smokeyjoel3355
 
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JimDawson

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#26
Welcome Aboard Smokeyjoel3355. You have to have about 3 posts before you can attach pictures. You'll get there pretty quick.

Look at the wiring diagram in your manual. It's page 12 in my copy. We'll help you through the symbols if you have trouble with them, it can be a little daunting at first glance. And the manual in general is difficult to translate, and in addition the Huanyang VFDs are a bit quirky.

In general you have to set the Motor Voltage, Motor Amps, Poles, Base Frequency, Acceleration, Deceleration, and Operating Mode. It's best to get it running from the keypad first, then switch the mode to remote (your new panel) after you have it set up correctly and the motor is running correctly.
 

Smokey Joel 3355

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#27
Thanks JimDawson,
I will start a post today.
I do have the wiring diagram but I was not sure about the common and volts. I have these questions:

1. The diagram shows the control places to wire the forward and reverse switch to two contactors, for no, and rev nc. with a red and a black wire on one end to go to the for/ rev contacts on the vfd. I also have a jumper across the other end of the 2 contactors with a green wire doubled up with one end of the jumper going to the DCM.
2. I have PDOO1 SET TO (1) EXTERNAL CONTROL.
I have PDO44 SET TO (5) FOR THE RUN FUNCTION.
I hace PDO45 SET TO (5) FOR F/R

Does that sound correct? I can wire houses because I know how it works visualize how the switches but not how the n/o and n/c work. Also others has the turm DCM ACCROSS FOR/REV, OR START AND STOP. Does that mean the way I doubled up with the jumper on the end of the n0/nc contacts and run to the DCM is correct?

Thanks for any help. I do not want to put the wrong codes in and damage the vfd.

You never know the day nor the hour.

Smokey Joel 3355
 

JimDawson

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#28
Let's start with a few standard definitions just to get on the same page.

N/O = Normally Open Contacts, actuate the switch to Close the Contacts
N/C = Normally Closed Contacts, actuate the switch to Open the Contacts.
Terminal = the screw you hook the wires to, like on the switch or VFD terminal block
Contacts = the switch contacts, the actual switch inside the Contact Block on the switch.
Contactor = a large relay normally used for heavy power loads or motor starting.

A light switch in a house is usually considered a N/O switch, when you actuate the switch the Contacts Close and the light turns on.

DCM is the common, it should be wired through the N/C Stop Button Contacts, then to one side of the For/Rev N/O contact terminal and one side of the Start switch N/O contact terminal. The other side of the For/Rev and Start switch should be wired to the proper terminals on the VFD terminal block.

The Stop button should be a Maintained Position switch. Think light switch again, you flip the switch and the light stays on until you turn the switch Off again. The Starter switch in you car is a Momentary Contact switch, it springs back when you release the key after starting. I think the VFD can be setup to accept a Momentary Position switch for the start terminal.

Take a look at this thread http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/huanyang-vfd-wiring-setup-vfd-newbie.34107/

Below is a wiring diagram just for ease of reference later


FQTM3DFGWF6ETFW.MEDIUM.jpg
 

Smokey Joel 3355

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#29
Let's start with a few standard definitions just to get on the same page.

N/O = Normally Open Contacts, actuate the switch to Close the Contacts
N/C = Normally Closed Contacts, actuate the switch to Open the Contacts.
Terminal = the screw you hook the wires to, like on the switch or VFD terminal block
Contacts = the switch contacts, the actual switch inside the Contact Block on the switch.
Contactor = a large relay normally used for heavy power loads or motor starting.

A light switch in a house is usually considered a N/O switch, when you actuate the switch the Contacts Close and the light turns on.

DCM is the common, it should be wired through the N/C Stop Button Contacts, then to one side of the For/Rev N/O contact terminal and one side of the Start switch N/O contact terminal. The other side of the For/Rev and Start switch should be wired to the proper terminals on the VFD terminal block.

The Stop button should be a Maintained Position switch. Think light switch again, you flip the switch and the light stays on until you turn the switch Off again. The Starter switch in you car is a Momentary Contact switch, it springs back when you release the key after starting. I think the VFD can be setup to accept a Momentary Position switch for the start terminal.

Take a look at this thread http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/huanyang-vfd-wiring-setup-vfd-newbie.34107/

Below is a wiring diagram just for ease of reference later


FQTM3DFGWF6ETFW.MEDIUM.jpg
Thank you JimDawson for your reply. I will study up on my definitions. I thank you for your reply. All you members seem to be really good about helping others. I will study the information and reply back.
SmokeyJoel3355
 

lo7us

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#30
Thank you "Aero Hawk" I borrowed your idea on cleaning up the wiring for the HY VFD and I opted to use a remote control panel with a long 10 pin ribbon cable (AliExpress $13) and installed the control panel on a metal weather resistant conduit box, and welded tabs on some scrap steel to locate the VFD remote control panel near the operators controls, bit no hi voltage and all chip and coolant splash resistant. Here are some photos: 20180331_095417.jpg 20180331_110928.jpg HY electrical base parts.jpg 20180402_113342.jpg 20180402_130034.jpg 20180402_131536.jpg 20180402_133800.jpg 20180402_160524.jpg 20180402_185237.jpg
 

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