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Pcmaker

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#1
Found this video on Youtube. I was thinking of doing the same to my new lathe, though I'm a newbie, so I'm a bit hesitant.

What's that blue paint he's got? I've seen it before on milling videos. Also, what's that scraper tool he's using to flatten out the surfaces?

 

Richard King 2

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#2
Nelson told us in the Reconditioning forum not to add You Tube shows. Why didn't you ask this question in the reconditioning forum?
 

eeler1

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#3
Experienced people hesitate to do it. Newbies probably shouldn’t be scraping on their lathe.
 

Pcmaker

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#4
Nelson told us in the Reconditioning forum not to add You Tube shows. Why didn't you ask this question in the reconditioning forum?
I didn't even know what the term "reconditioning" is as it pertains to machining. I try not to wander outside of the beginner's section as I'm a newbie's newbie and I'll just get lost in the terminology that I'm not yet familiar with. I don't want to flood myself with too much info as of yet.
 

Richard King 2

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#5
If you want to see an experienced reconditioner type my name Richard King Scraping on You Tube and you will see several students who filmed me.
You should look down the forums. You have 61 messages, you're no longer a rookie.
 

Ken from ontario

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#6
I found the reconditioning forum just now.
 
Last edited:

benmychree

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#7
Reconditioning generally pertains to the refitting of worn machinery, and to my mind, the compound rest of a lathe is probably the least worn sliding surface on any lathe; the reason that many people work on a compound rest is that it is a small project that lends itself to the training process as a small project that teaches the lessons that would provide general knowledge of the scraping process that would prepare them for larger projects, such as the cross slide of a lathe for refitting. This is not something to enter into willy nilly and is not to be adequately learned by most any U Tube video; research (reading) is required, and at best, a class to learn the skills is recommended, such as Rich King's classes, conveying proven information and teaching proven skills and technique.
 

eeler1

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#8
what he said
 

BROCKWOOD

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#9
Richard King's abilities to go beyond bringing a machine's ways true is celebrated in his ability to actually teach his approach & methods. This is seen on Keith Rucker's & so many other's videos as far away as our friend Stefan Gotteswinter in Germany. By saying & I quote, "I'm a newbie's newbie and I'll just get lost in the terminology that I'm not yet familiar with. I don't want to flood myself with too much info as of yet." You are negating up front anyone's desire to help. This is just wrong. We have people that don't speak our language taking real interest & doing their best to digest any info shared with them. This is because they are genuinely interested in actually learning regardless of input & feedback. Other sites will do that to a man - just beat down anything said. I've been there too. Here? Shoot straight or wonder why there are no replies. What John York said in response to you is a credit to him, his patience & his higher learning. I can only aspire to his understanding. As a newbie myself, I say what I have so point blank to you to help you aim your course true that your successes may multiply.
 

Richard King 2

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#10
When I teach classes in the Bay Area, I invite John to attend.....As he is a great teacher and has forgot more about machine tools either running them or repairing them most will ever know. I consider him a "Best Friend" too. I always love to invite men of his qualifications to come to my classes.

The next class in Zainesville OH the host is John Saunders of NYC CNC on you tube and I have invited Alex Slocum - Professor at MIT to attend. If he comes it will be a high light of my career. :) Everyone have a safe 4th. Happy Birthday to the USA! Rich
 

Eddyde

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#11
Found this video on Youtube. I was thinking of doing the same to my new lathe, though I'm a newbie, so I'm a bit hesitant.
Why do you want to scrape in a new lathe, are you having accuracy problems?
 

benmychree

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#12
When I teach classes in the Bay Area, I invite John to attend.....As he is a great teacher and has forgot more about machine tools either running them or repairing them most will ever know. I consider him a "Best Friend" too. I always love to invite men of his qualifications to come to my classes.

The next class in Zainesville OH the host is John Saunders of NYC CNC on you tube and I have invited Alex Slocum - Professor at MIT to attend. If he comes it will be a high light of my career. :) Everyone have a safe 4th. Happy Birthday to the USA! Rich
Rich does not tell the whole story on me, which, in addition to what he says, I am entirely too social in that I may divert from teaching mode into social or storytelling mode; we (mostly) all do the best that we can ------ Rich certainly does, without a fault, and has high expectations for others!
 

markba633csi

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#13
PC: didn't you just buy that lathe? Is it too late to consider returning it for a bit better one?
You shouldn't need to be taking extreme measures (like scraping) on a new machine to get it to work reasonably well
Mark
 

WarrenP

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#14
Yes, I would think scraping a new lathe would not be considered. If it's that bad they should take it back. If not you should probably use your time on better projects.
 

Pcmaker

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#15
PC: didn't you just buy that lathe? Is it too late to consider returning it for a bit better one?
You shouldn't need to be taking extreme measures (like scraping) on a new machine to get it to work reasonably well
Mark

There's nothing wrong with my lathe. This video was shown on my Youtube front page and I watched it and found it interesting. It might be something I want to do after I have a couple years experience under my belt.
 

vtcnc

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#16
There's nothing wrong with my lathe. This video was shown on my Youtube front page and I watched it and found it interesting. It might be something I want to do after I have a couple years experience under my belt.
A couple of additional thoughts. First, read up on the subject. I think it is Connelly’s book that will get you up to speed on knowledge but not experience. Second, practice on a small project or scrap piece of cast iron and get a feel for it. This experience will tell you more about yourself so you can then decide if scraping is something for you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

stuartw

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#17
A couple of suggestions from a mini-lathe owner. If you are trying to work on parts longer than a couple inches: focus on buying or making a stable base for it which is -very- level, straight and flat (at least relative to the 4 corners of your table) and bolted into the floor if possible. These mini machines are very prone to distorting. If the table isn't level, if one corner of your base is higher or lower, you will be able to measure a difference between the ways on the lathe, it will twist, bend or bow or perhaps all of the above - even if the base is dialed in, if you over tighten one of the bolts, it's enough to demonstrably pull it out of alignment. 2. check to make sure your tail stock is in-line with your head stock, if it's not, long parts will have a bit of a taper which is probably not what you want.

If you want to go and scrape your lathe, that's of course your prerogative and I know there's some very knowledgeable people like Richard King on this forum to point you in the right direction, but, speaking from some experience on a small lathe there seems to be endless things that can be improved before going down this path.
 
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