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McKenzie Lathe

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Mike Hage

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#1
Hello Izzy Mike Hage from Gibbs Sask here. Just joined the forum have been looking at the photos of your McKenzie lathe for some time. I recently purchased the very same machine from an old tractor restorer in St. Joseph's. Unfortunately when I went to pick it up the man had passed away not a day before. He learned on that lathe and taught both his sons on that machine. Same as you I hauled it home, took it all apart piece by piece, (in the dark) rolled the bed on logs into the garage. Then I spent the whole winter cleaning, polishing, learning. I sandblasted the big pieces and have it more or less all put together. I don't have a tool post for it or any gears. I have to find a motor for it he told me 3 to 5 horse. I will show some pictures but I'm not sure how to do that. Any ideas?
 

Martin W

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#3
Hi Mike
Nice lathe
Cheers
Martin
 

francist

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#4
Looks like a beauty, looking forward to more. :encourage:

-frank
 

Nogoingback

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#5
Very nice looking machine. Keep those posts coming, and welcome to the forum.
 

kdecelles

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#6
Mike, looks great. Can you post some more photos around the head stick? I'm interested in the countershaft setup and what looks to be some oilers on the spindle




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Mike Hage

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#7
20180808_084752.jpg 20180808_084752.jpg 20180808_084815.jpg 20180808_084832.jpg
Mike, looks great. Can you post some more photos around the head stick? I'm interested in the countershaft setup and what looks to be some oilers on the spindle




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20181113_081522.jpg
 

Mike Hage

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#9
Mike, looks great. Can you post some more photos around the head stick? I'm interested in the countershaft setup and what looks to be some oilers on the spindle




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20180808_084804.jpg
 

kdecelles

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#10
Fantastic! The pictures were perfect

I grew up east of Yorkton , live in Alberta now. I picked up a Von wyck circa 1905. Very similar headstock setup . I'm not happy with how the countershaft was done on my late, it is attached to the back and is rests in the front

I was curious as to how you were going to mount your second cone and power this lathe?


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Mike Hage

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#11
I'd really love to do a line drive from the ceiling along with a few other vintage machines, drill press, shaper, trip hammer, but that's gonna have to wait. I have another cone machined out of aluminum with a bracket that mounts on top with a short belt I'll post a photo once I get it set up. I'm waiting to find a suitable motor. He told me 3 to 5 horse?
 

Nogoingback

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#12
Mike, looks great. Can you post some more photos around the head stick? I'm interested in the countershaft setup and what looks to be some oilers on the spindle

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20181113_081302.jpg

That shaft doesn't look like a counter shaft: it looks like it's set up for back gear. You can see the pin on the bull gear,
and it looks as though the shaft is mounted on an eccentric.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#13
the lathe is awesome!
i love the old iron!!
are you gonna use a cantilevered drive or an overhead arrangement for the drive motor ?

i have an antique Flather lathe that was modified long ago with an overhead arrangement.
 

Mike Hage

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#14
the lathe is awesome!
i love the old iron!!
are you gonna use a cantilevered drive or an overhead arrangement for the drive motor ?

i have an antique Flather lathe that was modified long ago with an overhead arrangement.
View attachment 279969

That shaft doesn't look like a counter shaft: it looks like it's set up for back gear. You can see the pin on the bull gear,
and it looks as though the shaft is mounted on an eccentric.
Bear with me I'm very new to this. What is a counter shaft? There is kind of a transmission on the front? 20180808_084752.jpg
 

Mike Hage

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#15
the lathe is awesome!
i love the old iron!!
are you gonna use a cantilevered drive or an overhead arrangement for the drive motor ?

i have an antique Flather lathe that was modified long ago with an overhead arrangement.
Not sure what a cantilevered drive is. I have a bracket with a stepped pulley and a short belt. I will post pics once I get it mounted. It's kinda ugly I'd really like to do a line drive from the ceiling. All my old men that I could ask about these things are dying or gone already. What does your drive look like?
 

Ulma Doctor

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#16
Not sure what a cantilevered drive is. I have a bracket with a stepped pulley and a short belt. I will post pics once I get it mounted. It's kinda ugly I'd really like to do a line drive from the ceiling. All my old men that I could ask about these things are dying or gone already. What does your drive look like?
this overhead arrangement was done in the late 40's or early 50's, if i had to guess.
here is a picture of the drive on the ol' Flather
FLATHER 8.jpg
 

Mike Hage

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#17
Yup that's kinda what I'm doing too
 

kdecelles

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#18
Mine is similar. The handle under the pulley on the left sets the tension, like a clutch. You turn the motor on and then ease in the belt

IMG_3317.JPG


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Nogoingback

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#19
Bear with me I'm very new to this. What is a counter shaft? There is kind of a transmission on the front? View attachment 280131
Lathes with back gear capability basically give you a kind of high and low range for spindle speed. Have a look at the secondary
shaft. On the end is a lever, which should allow you to engage and disengage the gears on that shaft with the gears on the
spindle. Now look at the bull gear (larger gear on the tailstock end of the spindle). On the side is a flat headed pin. By pulling
that pin out or pushing it in, you should be able to disengage or engage the bull gear from the pulleys for the flat belt. In back gear (low range),
the shafts are in mesh and the pin on the bull gear should be out. Power passes through the secondary shaft and back to the
bull gear. With the pin in and the shafts not meshed together, the spindle
should turn faster for a given motor speed since it is in "direct drive".

The gearbox on the front is engaged to turn the shaft that passes through it and runs bellow the edge of the bed. Notice it
passes behind the apron on the carriage. When that shaft is turning, it should be possible to power feed the carriage
towards the headstock. Some lathes also can cross feed under power as well. It looks as though your lathe is missing
some parts, since there should be a gear train that connects the shaft on the gear box with the gears at the outboard
end of the spindle. Without those parts, you won't be able to power feed, but you still can turn parts manually.
 

kdecelles

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#21
I run an ISO 220 oil on my front bushing/bearings. It is a total-loss system in that it drains into the chip tray and out a few casting holes onto the floor

I think iso32 was too thin, iso68 is ok for the ways (I use a way oil that's sae30 for that)

The debate will rage on as there are a million opinions . If you google plain bearing oil grade you'll see what I mean

Here is a link to a Mobil brand. https://www.mobil.com/en/industrial/lubricants/products/morgoil-220-oil

My lathe came with grease zerks on those bearings (yikes) but I switched them out and put oilers on. Took it all apart and cleaned it out.

I also check my bearing temp while running and use that as a guide for bearing cap tightness and oil throughput




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kdecelles

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#22
You can see my oilers in my previous picture




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Mike Hage

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#23
I run an ISO 220 oil on my front bushing/bearings. It is a total-loss system in that it drains into the chip tray and out a few casting holes onto the floor

I think iso32 was too thin, iso68 is ok for the ways (I use a way oil that's sae30 for that)

The debate will rage on as there are a million opinions . If you google plain bearing oil grade you'll see what I mean

Here is a link to a Mobil brand. https://www.mobil.com/en/industrial/lubricants/products/morgoil-220-oil

My lathe came with grease zerks on those bearings (yikes) but I switched them out and put oilers on. Took it all apart and cleaned it out.

I also check my bearing temp while running and use that as a guide for bearing cap tightness and oil throughput




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Mine came with grease zerks too! After all the work I did cleaning up this lathe it's kinda sad to have oil splattered aĺl over it. Oh well that's what a rag is for
 

kdecelles

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#24
I was just in the shop.... there is nothing like the smell of oil and steel


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middle.road

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#25
That is magnificent!
 

benmychree

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#26
Your oilers are very pretty, but the do not belong on that lathe, much more practical are wick feed oilers, much smaller with hinged lids on top and a standpipe inside with a wick going down the pipe near the spindle and looping over the pipe into the reservoir. Polish those oilers up and display them somewhere else, it would be a shame to accidently break one of them, besides you might be tempted to fill them, and forget to shut it off, the result being a big puddle on the floor and oil is not cheap any more.
 

kdecelles

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#27
I never found a reliable source for wick oilers. I have a set of GIT hinge top oilers (not wick though) which are 'ok' but require constant attention. I'm not partial to the brass and glass (really plastic), but they work very well in that I can nicely regulate flow, confirm levels etc.

It's not 'if' but 'when' I break one..... agreed. But until then, it's better than the plugged zerk mess it came with. If you can send me a link to a good quality wick oiler, I'd appreciate it though.
 

benmychree

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#28
You may be able to fit standpipes in the Gits oilers, another alternative is the Lunkenheimer bronze oil cups with screwed on lids, I have fitted some with standpipes by drilling and reaming a hole where the normal oil passage is and driving in a steel tube standpipe. More commonly, back in the day, the cup was partially packed with felt or yarn to meter oil out to the bearing. Headstock bearings on a lathe running at normal speeds do not really need very much oil, a drip oiler adjusted down to a flow that addresses the bearing's minimal needs is likely to clog and not feed at all, and an adjustment to assure flow is just wasting oil and making a mess. My little 9" Monarch has what look to be original spring closed oil cups, I punched out a piece of felt to insert in the bearing cap below the oil cup to filter the oil and meter it; I just give it a squirt of oil when starting up, and that is all that is required. With the American High Duty lathe that I had years ago, it came with hinged wick feed cups, and worked fine, when filling the cups, you can squirt a little oil down the standpipe if the machine has ben sitting a long time without running, but since the wick has been feeding to some degree all the time until empty, that may be unnecessary. With wick cups, after the bearing heats up to normal operating temperature, the oil thins and feeds faster than when cold.
I never found a reliable source for wick oilers. I have a set of GIT hinge top oilers (not wick though) which are 'ok' but require constant attention. I'm not partial to the brass and glass (really plastic), but they work very well in that I can nicely regulate flow, confirm levels etc. A good wick for wick feed oilers is ordinary pipe cleaners, bend in the middle to double up, stick down the hold, and bend the fre legs over into the reservoir.

It's not 'if' but 'when' I break one..... agreed. But until then, it's better than the plugged zerk mess it came with. If you can send me a link to a good quality wick oiler, I'd appreciate it though.
The oil cups that you speak of, the Gits brand would be more satisfactory if you stuck a piece of felt in the neck or the bearing cap to filter and regulate the flow, it should be a fairly hard grade of felt, or wicking that is compacted fairly tightly.
 

Dabbler

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#29
I love thos old machines! Very nice find!
 

benmychree

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#30
How much more appropriate would this pair of oilers would be? They can be easily modified for a standpipe for wick feed, I quickly polished the one, they are both in nice shape, with 1/4" pipe thread connection; they are available.
 
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