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Myford carriage stop

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Ernienoatrainz

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#1
After a very bad crash while the carriage was under power it was time to change the stop that had come with the lathe. The previous owner set it up in such a way that there was a tube welded to a plate which was screwed to the side of the carriage While the carriage was under power I was just a little too late in releasing the lead screw nut lever. The end result was a jam were nothing could be done to loosen the jam. The only way to unjam it was to cut off the stop rod with a dermal tool.

In normal operation the stop was not very convenient as there were three different lengths depending on where the carriage was located for machining. So the original stop was in a sliding tube about 2 inches long with one end at the carriage side and the other against the change gear box. A clasp was used to index the rod and keep it in position. It worked great for hand operation. Under power you had to disengage the lead screw nut and finish the cut by hand.

After the jam I knew I had to change this arrangement.

Using the same tube brazed to a longer plate allowed the stop rod to pass under the carriage. Under power if it got to the stop, the worst that could happen was that the rod would just slip in the tube and not jam between the carriage and the gear box.

In addition this also allowed for an indicator to be located on the rod. An additional bracket was made in the form of a clamp for the stop rod and the indicator. This located the indicator out of the way of the lead screw nut lever and with an adjustment by moving the stop rod.

The photo shows what it looks like. So far this has been a great modification. I no longer have to change stop rods to get to the right position. And I have the added bonus of and indicator located on the carriage.

IMG_8711.JPG IMG_8712.JPG IMG_8713.JPG IMG_8714.JPG Lathe carriage stop (1).JPG IMG_8711.JPG IMG_8712.JPG IMG_8713.JPG IMG_8714.JPG Lathe carriage stop (1).JPG
 

ThunderDog

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#2
Sorry to hear about the crash, but the indicator on the carriage stop is a nice addition. I have a Myford "M" series and now you've got me thinking of a way to add something similar to mine.
 

Tozguy

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#3
Great idea to paint it red! Good work, thanks for the pics.
 

scwhite

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#4
After a very bad crash while the carriage was under power it was time to change the stop that had come with the lathe. The previous owner set it up in such a way that there was a tube welded to a plate which was screwed to the side of the carriage While the carriage was under power I was just a little too late in releasing the lead screw nut lever. The end result was a jam were nothing could be done to loosen the jam. The only way to unjam it was to cut off the stop rod with a dermal tool.

In normal operation the stop was not very convenient as there were three different lengths depending on where the carriage was located for machining. So the original stop was in a sliding tube about 2 inches long with one end at the carriage side and the other against the change gear box. A clasp was used to index the rod and keep it in position. It worked great for hand operation. Under power you had to disengage the lead screw nut and finish the cut by hand.

After the jam I knew I had to change this arrangement.

Using the same tube brazed to a longer plate allowed the stop rod to pass under the carriage. Under power if it got to the stop, the worst that could happen was that the rod would just slip in the tube and not jam between the carriage and the gear box.

In addition this also allowed for an indicator to be located on the rod. An additional bracket was made in the form of a clamp for the stop rod and the indicator. This located the indicator out of the way of the lead screw nut lever and with an adjustment by moving the stop rod.

The photo shows what it looks like. So far this has been a great modification. I no longer have to change stop rods to get to the right position. And I have the added bonus of and indicator located on the carriage.

View attachment 229691 View attachment 229692 View attachment 229693 View attachment 229694 View attachment 229695 View attachment 229691 View attachment 229692 View attachment 229693 View attachment 229694 View attachment 229695
Looks like a great improvement
I have a Clausing 4900 and I don't real like my carriage stop ether
 

Ernienoatrainz

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#5
So far this set up has been great. I can set the distance with the dial and then set the carriage stop. The only problem I can see is the dial getting to many chips. But this was an ENCO dial for $12.00. I have many extras if it gets messed up.
 

deverett

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#6
Bad news about the crash. Makes you sick when it happens, as I know to my cost!

I made a length stop for my S7, but hardly ever use it, relying on reading the leadscrew handwheel divisions. Safer for me. Length stop 3 (Medium).JPG Length stop 2 (Medium).JPG Length stop 1 (Medium).JPG IMG_0989 (Medium).JPG
IMG_0990 (Medium).JPG

The turret can hold 6 length bars and the stop uses the screw hole that Mr Myford conveniently put there to lock the headstock in place. For long work there is a mobile stop that clamps to the front shear.

Although I have been a subscriber for a while, I seem to have visited infrequently. Perhaps I should change my habits.

Dave
The Emerald Isle
 

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Ernienoatrainz

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#7
Hi Dave,
I had a turret stop like that when I bought the lathe. it is great for repetitive work. So far the set up I am using now is great for one off set ups which is most of what I do. Ernie
 
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