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Need clamping plate for Busy Bee B-244 tailstock

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toysareforboys

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busybee_metal lathe_b-244_final.jpg


Got a great deal on this mini lathe from the original owner. He only used it for woodworking so it hadn't seen any hard use and was maintained flawlessly.

Anyway, I broke the clamping plate in half (that goes under the tailstock). The bolt that was in it wasn't the original (i.e. it was a regular bolt, not a T bolt) and it slipped through the slot in the clamping plate (which spread it and split it in half).

I contacted Busy Bee (their main headquarters is only a 15 minute drive from me) but they said parts for this lathe were discontinued 15 years ago :(

I looked at some of their current mini lathes and non of the tailstocks/clamping plates seemed similar and the distance between the rails was different (the gap between my rails is 45mm).

Any suggestions on how to obtain a replacement? This lathe is the only piece of real equipment I have (no mill) so I don't think it'd be possible for me to recreate one. I asked a local shop about creating me a replacement but they didn't seem too excited.

Let me know please and thanks.

-Jamie M.
 
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WCraig

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Welcome to Hobby-Machinist!

Can you post a picture of the broken part? Does it have to be a precise size to maintain tailstock alignment? If not, it may be possible to hacksaw and file a decent replacement out of a piece of steel. Or perhaps a local member can help you out. (I don't have a mill either.)

BTW, what model is that lathe? It appears to be branded "Busy Bee" rather than Craftex. I think they introduced the Craftex label in the early 1980's so that makes the lathe 35+ years old.

Craig
 

RJSakowski

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When I broke the clamping plate on my Atlas/Craftsman 6x18, I made one from steel before I had a mill. It isn't a difficult project if you simplify the design. I used drill press, hack saw and files and cut the recess for a square head bolt with a cold chisel.

I have been using that clamping plate for more than forty years now and haven't had a reason to improve on my original design.
 

cbellanca

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The original was probably cast Iron. Make one out of steel.
 

toysareforboys

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Can you post a picture of the broken part? Does it have to be a precise size to maintain tailstock alignment? BTW, what model is that lathe?
I gave the part to a shop to re-create and they lost it :( It doesn't need to be super precise because the tailstock is aligned by the top rails, not the clamping plate, but the bolt hole/slot has to be precise to line up with the off-set hole in the tailstock. The model number of the lathe is B-244, dated 7 month of 1986:

298172


When I broke the clamping plate on my Atlas/Craftsman 6x18, I made one from steel before I had a mill. It isn't a difficult project if you simplify the design. I used drill press, hack saw and files and cut the recess for a square head bolt with a cold chisel.

I have been using that clamping plate for more than forty years now and haven't had a reason to improve on my original design.
Damn, nice!!! I might just give it a go, thanks.

The original was probably cast Iron. Make one out of steel.
Yep, it was, pretty brittle.

Thanks for all the encouragement guys, I might just give it a go making one.

-Jamie M.
 

toysareforboys

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If you need milling, I am 15 min east of Busybee
Oh baby, that could be super useful! What milling machine do you have? I found an amazing deal on an ancient one, pretty much free to a good home, just had to provide a forklift/transportation, but it was designed to run on 600 volts (three phase), didn't know how I could make that work at my house :(

Another user on this forum sent me a PM and he has a brand new clamping plate for it, part# is P2445011, I just gotta pay postage, nice!! I'll give that a go and if I break it again I'll get a better one made :)

I'll post up a pic when I get it.

Thanks again everyone.

-Jamie M.
 

toysareforboys

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This is the same as Jet BD920N and others, still made today.
Pierre
Wow, neat! The clamping plate looks identical to my stock one (#24, Jet CLAMPING PLATE BD-920N 8015).

298278


I don't think the bolt they show is the same one that came with my lathe originally because in the box of parts that came with my lathe it came with a "T bolt" that fit perfectly into the clamping plate/tailstock but the threads were all stripped out, and it had been replaced with just a regular bolt (like in the diagram). I imagine the T bolt spreads the force better so the clamping plate doesn't spread/crack as easily.

SUS-444-4.jpg


-Jamie M.
 
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WCraig

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I found an amazing deal on an ancient [milling machine], pretty much free to a good home, just had to provide a forklift/transportation, but it was designed to run on 600 volts (three phase), didn't know how I could make that work at my house :(
Free? Let me be the first to say, "You Suck"! ;)

There are several options to convert household single phase power to 3 phase. They have to be sized specifically to the motor that you want to run and that drives the cost. For a mill, a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) is likely to be the best choice since it also allows you to control the speed of the motor. Others here will have more experience with that than I have.

Craig
 

John O

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Oh baby, that could be super useful! What milling machine do you have? I found an amazing deal on an ancient one, pretty much free to a good home, just had to provide a forklift/transportation, but it was designed to run on 600 volts (three phase), didn't know how I could make that work at my house :(

Another user on this forum sent me a PM and he has a brand new clamping plate for it, part# is P2445011, I just gotta pay postage, nice!! I'll give that a go and if I break it again I'll get a better one made :)

I'll post up a pic when I get it.

Thanks again everyone.

-Jamie M.
It is a First mill, don't remember the model
 

Chipper5783

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Oh baby, that could be super useful! What milling machine do you have? I found an amazing deal on an ancient one, pretty much free to a good home, just had to provide a forklift/transportation, but it was designed to run on 600 volts (three phase), didn't know how I could make that work at my house :(

Thanks again everyone.

-Jamie M.

My goodness, get it if you can. The 600V 3ø is not a difficult issue to sort out. Go through the "Electrical Issues" portion of this web site - that question is about the second most ask topic that we see (the first one being "should I get this . . . . ", dumb question because the answer is always "yes").

The 600V and the 3 phase are two separate issues. Each can be dealt with a few different ways. The approach that is right for you will depend on what your present set up is and what your future intentions are. 3ø powered machines, and 600V machines are likely to be industrial quality (good) and the power issues will dissuade other buyers (also good). Go into it with your eyes open - just because it is "pretty much free" still means you'll have plenty of spend to get everything working well.

First issue is sorting out the 3ø. I went the approach of a "whole shop" solution. If you are in this game very long, you'll get other machines, and 3ø power is the norm. The ability to plug in and go, the main motor, secondary motors, controls - everything works as originally designed - it is awesome. I set myself up a little 3ø distribution system - over the years I've picked up additional machines (at 10 3ø machines now).

Second issue is the 600V. When I got my first 600V machine, it would have been quite a chore to swap over to 240V (the main motor would have been easy, but the feed motor would have been really difficult). I was able to get a good used little 3ø transformer. I have since acquired two more 600V machines - again they are now very easy to power up (and came essentially "free").

Don't expect "something for nothing". Let's say you get that "First mill" really cheap - First is a good brand. It will cost you a bit to move it, then it costs a little to power it, there will be pieces missing & broken (at least for every "cheap" machine I have hauled home there have been numerous minor issues), it will need to be cleaned and serviced, you'll need to buy tooling - and you can reasonably end up with a decent and capable machine for 5%-20% of what a new machine would have cost you.

"Pretty much free" does not mean anything. Look at the end cost. I have, and I've been able to equip / afford a very nice little shop with some excellent capabilities (it was not free, but it didn't break the bank).

Let us know how you make out. David
 

John O

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If you get the mill, I have a 220-550 single phase transformer I'm not using and depending on the amps a vfd as well.
 
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