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mjs408

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#1
I purchased a nishimori kogyo lathe last summer, and have not run it yet as I operate off of a ramen type budget currently. I have saved enough for some tooling and a VFD which for the time has to be shared by my mill (another project thread shortly )and lathe.

With that said I have this 60s vintage Japanese lathe that has a 5/8 tool (stud)post, but no T slot, is this normal for machines of this vintage? What type of tool post do I need to look for?

It has an A1-5 short taper style mounting flange, does anyone make a camlock adapter for these types of mounting flanges?

One interesting feature of this lathe is that instead of having a dial on the handle it has a build in long and short travel indicator. The dial lenses are a bit foggy so I have to figure out what to do there.


As I have found these lathes are a bit of an orphan so if you have any information on the please share.

Also, I should add I have taken classes to become a machinist/tool maker long ago(15 years), but I was a B student in an A+ world. So most machining terms and operations are not completely greek to me.
 

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T Bredehoft

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#2
Welcome to probably the best, most user friendly Hobby machinist board around.

You can use the compound as it is, but you will need either a four tool post or a Quick Change Tool Post, universally called here QCTP.

The screw that is there now can be removed and replaced by removing the compound, probably tricky for you, but not uncommon at all. There probably are some screws in the side of the compound, holding a gib, to adjust snugness. Back these off, so they are loose, and unscrew the lead screw, back the compound toward you until the screw is no longer moving the compound. pul gently and it should come off. Further disassembly will allow you to remove and replace the post screw if needed. Pay attention to what falls off as you are pulling the compound off, and where it came from, it will have to go back on. While its apart, do some fairly serious cleaning. You will be doing a lot of that, though. just keep it in mind.
 

mjs408

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I definitely understand the whole lotta cleaning to do part. Both the mill and lathe are filthy. So the stud will drop out after I pull the compound and I can replace it with a Shars or whomever's quick change post for my correct swing dia.


Next order if business is to find a decent 3 jaw chuck for it. All it came with is big 4 jaws.
 

willthedancer

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#4
A BXA qctp uses a 5/8 stud. I wouldn't make a change there.

Sent from my MotoE2(4G-LTE) using Tapatalk
 

mjs408

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Thanks for the info Will, I have been browsing toolposts but saw mainly metric options. Now I know what to look for.
 

mjs408

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Bump, anybody have info on the manufacturer of my lathe?
 

mjs408

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I've read that thread, I also found a thread with a rumor of a reprint owners manual for sale but haven't been able to find it.
 

jamby

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#10
Those trav-a-dials were a big hit in the 70's before digital readouts were everywhere. Only had a couple that did work fine. Some the grease/oil go to and they would skip.
Jim
 

cathead

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#11
I definitely understand the whole lotta cleaning to do part. Both the mill and lathe are filthy. So the stud will drop out after I pull the compound and I can replace it with a Shars or whomever's quick change post for my correct swing dia.


Next order if business is to find a decent 3 jaw chuck for it. All it came with is big 4 jaws.

It depends on what you turn in your lathe. If it's just shafts, a 3 jaw could suffice I guess. For my purposes though,
I turn shafts and also many other shapes. I have several 3 jaw chucks and they sit unused. You can turn eccentrics,
flat plates, odd shapes, and large parts. Also, with a dial indicator shafts can be chucked up with extreme accuracy.
I like the versatility of a 4 jaw and it can turn shafts too. It all boils down to what kind of work you are doing.
 
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British Steel

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#12
I'm with Cathead on this, I rarely-to-never use the 3-jaw, but have a selection of 4-jaws from 3" to 10", faceplates and collets. Most of what I do at some point involves picking up on a machined diameter and turning other diameters concentric with it, even a decent (Pratt Burnerd or whatever) 3-jaw has run-out, and run-out that varies with work diameter and clamping force, a 4-jaw can be as accurate as you and your DTI can make it, known good shafting can go in a collet and be within a tenth or two, with a wiggler / pump-centre in an accurate punch mark work on a faceplate can be as accurate as you can be bothered to make it.

If I was turning out multiples (tens/hundreds) and could finish a part in one chucking, no problem with a 3-jaw as all the resulting surfaces would be concentric, but once it's out of / moved in the jaws it will NEVER go back exactly where it was...

Of course, if you need to take the part out to try it and need it to go back concentric, there's no substitute for between-centres turning (says he, giving the game away about old-schoolness...)

Dave H. (the other one)
 

cathead

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#13
Also, I forgot to mention that a four jaw chuck can double as a faceplate if you remove the jaws, very handy. At least the one I have will do that.
 

Silverbullet

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#14
If I may suggest look at a six jaw chuck if you want a multi purpose one. If you think about it it's three chucks in one. Two , three, six. And if you get two piece jaws it's almost the perfect option.
 

4ssss

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I'm with Cathead on this, I rarely-to-never use the 3-jaw, but have a selection of 4-jaws from 3" to 10", faceplates and collets. Most of what I do at some point involves picking up on a machined diameter and turning other diameters concentric with it, even a decent (Pratt Burnerd or whatever) 3-jaw has run-out, and run-out that varies with work diameter and clamping force, a 4-jaw can be as accurate as you and your DTI can make it, known good shafting can go in a collet and be within a tenth or two, with a wiggler / pump-centre in an accurate punch mark work on a faceplate can be as accurate as you can be bothered to make it.

If I was turning out multiples (tens/hundreds) and could finish a part in one chucking, no problem with a 3-jaw as all the resulting surfaces would be concentric, but once it's out of / moved in the jaws it will NEVER go back exactly where it was...

Of course, if you need to take the part out to try it and need it to go back concentric, there's no substitute for between-centres turning (says he, giving the game away about old-schoolness...)

Dave H. (the other one)

A 3 jaw adjustable Buck Chuck solves all your 3 jaw run out problems in 1/2 the time of indicating a part in a 4 jaw.
 
B

British Steel

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#16
A 3 jaw adjustable Buck Chuck solves all your 3 jaw run out problems in 1/2 the time of indicating a part in a 4 jaw.
I doubt that - unless the adjust-tru has a miracle scroll that keeps the jaws on the same centre whatever the part diameter? Adjusting it in the backplate for absolute accuracy has to take almost as long as or longer than the 20 - 30 seconds to adjust a 4-jaw to less than a thou"?

Dave H. (the other one)
 

4ssss

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I doubt that - unless the adjust-tru has a miracle scroll that keeps the jaws on the same centre whatever the part diameter? Adjusting it in the backplate for absolute accuracy has to take almost as long as or longer than the 20 - 30 seconds to adjust a 4-jaw to less than a thou"?

Dave H. (the other one)


Well, we all have our opinions. When I was working on eyelet tools Buck's were all that was in the shop. I made thousands of punches and dies that had different diameters and the run out was minimal. On long parts you tap one end in and buck it up to within tenths. The same way it's done in a 4 jaw without having to adjust each jaw independently. Not only were the lathes equipped with Buck Chucks, but the cylindrical grinders (Myfords I may add) had them also. I guess it's all in the knowing how to do it.
 

mjs408

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#18
I havnt much time as of late [like the last year] to work on this. Ive finally gotten the chance to mess w it and all looks good beside the lever that allows power feed left or right isnt connected for some reason. Its in feed left now so no big deal.



The other issue is on the speeds and feeds gear box the pull handle is jammed and i dont want to get crazy with it trying to get it apart as i dont want to break it. Anybody have a name for this style handle/plunger?

After i get this moving its time for a vfd and tooling.
 

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mjs408

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#19
Well I decided to stop being a panzy and put a visegrip on the handle and smacked it a few time with a 3lb hammer. Fixed it! Now on to order a vfd and breaking resistor.

Plan too wire the current forward and reverse lever into the vfd
 
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