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PM1236 5C Collet Closer upgrade

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Grimstod

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#1
So I did a bunch of research before I jumped into this project. Basically I checked the spindle size and made sure the taper was the same. Also looked at the length of the spindle. After all that I figured I could make the Grizzly 5C collet closer for their G3004 lathe work on the PM1236. You can see here a quick run down video of it in place. Works pretty good. The first draw tube Grizzly sent me had a ton of runout and shoot the lathe so I sent them a video and they replaced it. Pretty happy with it. Hope those of you who have Precision Matthews excellent PM 1236 lathe could find this info useful.

 

Silverbullet

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#2
I wouldn't get another lathe without a lever 5C collet set up. My first lathe was a Sheldon and I had the lever collet set with it , I was doing sub contract work in my shop and I tell you the most used item was the collets. Hardly ever had chucks on the lathe. With the right set up oversized machinable collets . Even square hex, rectangle . Special ordered even . I had a tailstock turret that helped too. Time was everything to making money , accuracy and quick turnaround makes the shop name. You did a good job adding those good luck .
 

petertha

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#3
I've got a similar sized lathe & 5C collets using conventional collet chuck, but never really seen these lever closers in action. Is the general idea that you part off a completed part, open the collet with the handle, advance the stock, lock the handle, rinse & repeat? Or I guess also load semi finished parts in too. I take it the advantage is time reduction? How is the runout on these units?
 

Grimstod

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#4
These units tend to have very low runout. Usually in the tenths.
 
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