[4]

Polishing - dusty mess

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

eac67gt

Moderator
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
557



  1. eac67gt - 03-04-13, 07:46 AM
    One thing I really battle in polishing metal with the bench polisher is the "fuzzy" dust it creates. We have the shop setup in the basement of our home and dust control is important. At first it did not seem real bad when the polisher was setting in the open. I did not realize what kind of dust it was really creating. Boy what a mess. We are own a low budget so I moved the polisher and grinder to a corner than draped 3.5mil plastic down as walls. I had a small fan from a microwave and made a small box with filter material and put it up in the corner near ceiling. It helps creat an air flow under the platic drape and keeps the dust in. The only problem is now that I am in a confined area the dust is extreme. You come out of there and you are one big dust ball. I wear, after the family gave me hexx, a face mask and face shield. It makes it a little more safe but as I said the dust balls are a mess. I know there are ways to control this but they all cost $$$. I am looking for that redneck engineering way of controling those dust balls a little more. I need a big dust magnet.

    Anyone have ideas or input lets discuss it and other polishing issues.

    Ed​
    Edit Report IP
  2. JT. - 03-05-13, 10:11 AM
    got no picks but i now at kelbly inc they do some polishing and they have sitting there polish mills on a wooden table they have a
    rectangular cut out under the wheels with a draw unther it so they can clean it no ide if the got
    i will try to get a pic later​
    Edit Report IP
  3. xalky - 03-06-13, 07:04 PM
    You need a bigger exhaust fan. Draw fresh air in from the area that you want to keep clean and blow dirty air to the outside. You need replacement air to replace the air thats getting sucked out of your confinement space. A 1000 cfm fan would keep you almost dustless in your space, provided you have clean replacement air. I have quite a bit of experience with devising containment areas for remediations. It's simple, really, once the principle is understood.​
    Edit Report IP
  4. eac67gt - 03-06-13, 08:35 PM
    Well my cheap way I am going to go about it is I am going to use a 20" variable speed box fan and a furnace filter. I was blowing the air out of the area with the much smaller fan and there is room under may plastic drape for air to come in but it just wasn't enough air moving to do the job.
    I think this will do the job now and will only cost me $20.

    Ed​
    Edit Report IP
  5. xalky - 03-07-13, 11:41 PM
    Yeah, It's all about air movement. The air inlet will restrict the fan output if it's not sufficient...you know...garbage in, garbage out. If you don't have sufficient air "in" you'll just create a vacuum which won't do what you want. So long as your getting plenty of air movement inside the confinement you'll be fine. I never meant to imply that it has to be costly to be effective. ;)
    Edit Report IP
  6. fretsman - 03-08-13, 08:22 PM
    Good info here, but how do you heat the newly entered air that is being drawn in when all your heat is being blown outward?

    Dave​
    Edit Report IP
  7. xalky - 03-09-13, 09:43 AM
    Well there's no voodoo to it. You can pull clean warm air into the confinement, but obviously your gonna lose the heat to the outdoors if your venting to the outside. If your hell bent on keeping the heat then you'll need a sturdy filter/fan box to mount the fan too and make the bof to accept a standard size furnace filter and exhaust the heat back into your heated space. With a good powerful fan and a filter box, you'll only need a filter on the exhaaust side, and your fan has to be on the exhaust side too, in this way, even if there are holes/leaks in your confinement it will pull clean air in through the intake and any leaks you might have, because of the negative air pressure in the confinement space.​
    Edit Report IP
  8. eac67gt - 03-09-13, 09:52 AM
    On my polish area I just hung the fan and filter but I think it should be down low because right now I have it up higher and it seems to pull dust balls up. I guess in some ways it makes sense. What I am going to try is put it at the floor and have my air come in up higher and hopefully it will pull dust down more than all over me. After just a little polishing I go look in the mirror and my face is covered in black and that was with a face shield on.
    Ed​
    Edit Report IP
  9. xalky - 03-09-13, 11:05 AM
    There's not a whole lot that you can do to eliminate dust projectiles coming off of your wheel. But here's an idea: If you felt so inclined, You could rig up a cheap sand blasting cabinet, but instead of using it as a blasting cabinet, you use as a buffing cabinet. Hook your shop vac to it and there you go. The main downside to that setup might be difficulty in getting a good visual on your work.

    Ed, the cool thing about your buffing area now is that you can use it for all types of dirty dust work such as spray painting and powder coating and even some sand blasting. If your confinement and air exchange is setup properly you can do all kinds of dirty stuff in there. For instance to sand blast, just move the buffing wheel out to not contaminate it with blasting media and install your blaster in there. When your done blasting vaccuum up all the blasting mess and your back to a clean room. Same goes for painting or powder coating.​
 
Last edited by a moderator:

eac67gt

Moderator
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
557
Update on the dust.
I first put the fan up high and the air came in down low. That was dumb. All it did was raise the dust.
Now I have the fan and filter at floor and have the air come in right behind me at the polisher from up at the ceiling.
This is working great. Its all such a simple idea but I never make anything easy.
Still thinking about adding the vac to the pan under the polishing wheels.
Thanks all for your input.

Have a great day!

Ed
 

xalky

Global Moderator
Registered
Joined
Jun 17, 2012
Messages
2,014
Update on the dust.
I first put the fan up high and the air came in down low. That was dumb. All it did was raise the dust.
Now I have the fan and filter at floor and have the air come in right behind me at the polisher from up at the ceiling.
This is working great. Its all such a simple idea but I never make anything easy.
Still thinking about adding the vac to the pan under the polishing wheels.
Thanks all for your input.

Have a great day!

Ed
The direction of the airflow ultimately makes a difference, as you see.

With that thought in mind: It makes sense to be able to make air direction adjustable by means of flex ducts or an easy way to move your fan and filters. And/OR reversing the direction of the fan and filters
 

eac67gt

Moderator
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
557
So another update!
The new setup does work great!
I polished a whole bunch of parts last night to a mirror shine and made lots of dirt.
The cool thing it did all gather over either in front of fan or on the filter mounted to the fan.
No dirt escaped the draped in area but me. :rofl:
So for $20 I managed to control the dust to an acceptable level and I had very little dust on me. :thumbzup:
The whole thing was as simple as draping $10 worth of plastic and adding a $15 fan and $5 filter.
 
[5] [7]
Top