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[4]

Post Drill Restoration (Learning experience)

January Project of the Month [3]
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STurnerXM2010

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#1
Well, my first attempt at using chemical treatments with rust removal. Turns out, I'm used to molar values when dealing with chemicals and completely skipped the entire label that outlines concentration in percentages of the whole...not mols. I damn near killed myself. As you might imagine, muraitic acid (HCl) does some crazy stuff when it is concentrated and comes in contact with an oxidizer. LOL I was pushing my welders out of the garage like I was freeing horses from a barn fire. The wife wasn't impressed.

Lesson learned. That being said, I'm halfway impressed at how the little post drill came around. I took my time with the final chemistry of the metal (as you might imagine) and sealed her up when I was satisfied with the neutralization. Huge fan of this blue regardless of period incorrectness. I also love the way the brass plate came out after three coats of clear poly. This is the first one I've done and it was cool to uncover the original uses. Not a drill press... a post drill. Learned that one quick. LOL
 

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STurnerXM2010

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#3
There is a difference between Restoration and Conservation.
You might notice that several of my machines are the same shade of blue.
Nice work.

Daryl
MN
Well put. That's exactly what it is. I'd not heard that before. I like it. LOL
 

mikey

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#4
That came out really nice! Personally, I rather like that blue color.

Have you tried Electrolytic Rust Removal? Way safer than acid. There is also Evaporust and it is quickly becoming my method of choice for smaller items. If that was my drill, it would have been taken apart and put in an electrolytic bath.
 

STurnerXM2010

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#5
That came out really nice! Personally, I rather like that blue color.

Have you tried Electrolytic Rust Removal? Way safer than acid. There is also Evaporust and it is quickly becoming my method of choice for smaller items. If that was my drill, it would have been taken apart and put in an electrolytic bath.
I'm not sure that I have. I have tried reverse electrolysis on a Model T bumper jack, with mixed results. I'm trying to find that sweet spot between not having to let it soak for 36 hours and watching it melt as its submerged. LOL I think I've seen that Evaporust at O'Reilly's and have heard good things. It's harder to find these days, but this "Krud Kutter" seems to work pretty well. It's got a "pickling" agent in it as well. I really like the fact that I can pour it down the drain once completed as well. Got a 9 month old son that is paying me back for my youth and will find it in a heartbeat if it's dangerous.
 

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STurnerXM2010

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#6
Long lost brothers! "Toothy" found his mean big brother after a night of making Corvettes cry and Mustangs sit in the corner and pout.

I may need to switch up my color schemes. That blue might grow on me...
 

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mikey

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I'm not sure that I have. I have tried reverse electrolysis on a Model T bumper jack, with mixed results. I'm trying to find that sweet spot between not having to let it soak for 36 hours and watching it melt as its submerged. LOL I think I've seen that Evaporust at O'Reilly's and have heard good things. It's harder to find these days, but this "Krud Kutter" seems to work pretty well. It's got a "pickling" agent in it as well. I really like the fact that I can pour it down the drain once completed as well. Got a 9 month old son that is paying me back for my youth and will find it in a heartbeat if it's dangerous.
The Must For Rust is phosphoric acid; works good. However, electrolytic rust removal does not involve acids. Here is an article on it that I like: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyspatch/rust.htm. Do a search on this process; there is a lot of info on the net about it. It is the best non-destructive process I know of and it allows you to de-rust stuff that would be expensive to do any other way.

I once told my son that one day my revenge would be for him to have a son just like him. As it turned out, I am blessed to have a son just like him.
 

STurnerXM2010

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#8
Now that's what I need. I've attempted this technique in the past, but I really like the purpose built circuit. I was thinking about building a dedicated tank for this if I had had much success. After reading that article, I wasn't giving it a fair shot. I really just used some TSP and a battery charger connected to this contraption I've attached a picture of. Thank you for that article, I may get a wild hair this evening. Need to get started on a Crizbe (Plymouth, Indiana foundry) #16 bench grinder/polisher. I think she's pre-1915(ish).
 

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