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Really old Lathe

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benmychree

John York
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#1
I took these pics at a friend's place yesterday; lathes this old are quite rare. Jakes Machines resized.jpg
 

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markba633csi

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#2
Yep that's old- the milling machine in the back looks interesting too
M
 

benmychree

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#3
The milling machine is likely 1870s, and also there are several planers and several more lathes, all circa 1850 - 60. Will post more pics as time permits.
 

benmychree

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#5
Here (hopefully) is the other pic of the milling machine. Click on the pic title to expand the image. The arbor support is new, was missing, the owner made a pattern, had it cast in iron, and I machined it for him.
 

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Eddyde

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#6
That looks like a pattern makers lathe.
 

brino

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#7
Great machines John!
Any indication of maker of the lathe and mill?
Thanks for sharing.
-brino
 

benmychree

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#8
But, its not ( a patternmakers lathe), it is a screw cutting engine lathe with back gearing; In many ways it is peculiar, such as the weighted carriage (see the big weight hanging underneath) there is no other provision to hold the carriage down on the ways, also note the very short travel of the cross slide, only perhaps 3 or 4 inches, and the carriage is move back and forth by a leaf chain between the ways by sprockets, there is no rack gear or apron. The power feed long ways is powered by the worm and gear setup below the headstock, which pulls the carriage by the chain. There is supposed to be a large wheel on the worm gear shaft to make fast motion adjustments to the carriage while the worm is disengaged.
There is a similar lathe in the Smithsonian collection that has this feature, only it would seem to be even older, in that it has a wooden bed with iron way strips screwed on top of the bed.
 

benmychree

John York
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#9
Great machines John!
Any indication of maker of the lathe and mill?
Thanks for sharing.
-brino
No, so far as the lathe is concerned, there is not a name anywhere on it, but I suspect that it might be the same maker as the one in the Smithsonian collection that is quite similar; I have not looked into whether that one has been identified as to the maker.
As to the mill, it is named, but I do not remember what it is --- maybe Garvin?
 

Bob Korves

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#11
John, you made it to Jake's shop! That is a VERY special place, with lots of interesting (and very old) machines and tools. Should be a museum...
 

benmychree

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#12
Great machines John!
Any indication of maker of the lathe and mill?
Thanks for sharing.
-brino
The milling machine is a Garvin #7. This number does not follow the usual numbering system followed by most manufacturers, it is about the size of a #3 mill in today's nomenclature; also, it is a universal, able to cut spirals, and has an original dividing head made for spiral work.
 

benmychree

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#13
Yes I made it there this last Saturday; I had seen some pictures of a few of the machines in the past, but had no idea of how many machines there are there. I took a lot of pictures, but due to how crowded things are many were perhaps not good enough to present. Sounds like a museum/shop is the plan, but it has to happen elsewhere. I especially liked the steam engine, it has to be nearly the age of the lathe.
 
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