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Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10

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pdentrem

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I have started to make a replacement compound slide as my original cast iron one is a repaired one and I do not want to continue to use it.

First you start with a block of steel and square it up. Yesterday I milled out the area for the nut for the screw and the majority of the metal where the dovetail will be. I hope to do the dovetail on the weekend and then surface the top down to the right height for the Phase II tool post.
Only 2 pictures at the moment. Will post more later when there is more to show.

what i started with.jpg hogged out prior to dovetail.jpg

what i started with.jpg hogged out prior to dovetail.jpg
 
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ChuckB

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Stuff like this humbles and amazes me at the same time. 8)

Keep the pictures coming : :)
 

Tony Wells

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When I give up finding a used one for my Monarch, I'll build one. Here's a short video of someone building one:

[video=youtube;Xss9GqJrorI] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xss9GqJrorI [/video]



OT...ChuckB, since there is an issue on the PM system, I'll ask here. Are you an ARF member?
 
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pdentrem

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Well in watching the video, I see that I will not make as many chips, as I started with flat stock to begin with. Pretty good and basically it is what I will make as well but without the T-slot for the tool post. As the Atlas has a much smaller slide the tool will be centrally located with just a threaded hole to receive the hold down bolt.
 

pdentrem

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Here is an update on the new compound slide. It was delayed due to illness in family, but I am catching up now.

I cut the dovetail this afternoon at a friends place. He has a Busybee mill and as the BP one at work was setup for other stuff for the next few days, I decided to use his. It is also a teaching moment for him as he has limited experience with the mill.

After supper I drilled and tapped the gib screws and cleaned up the burrs etc. I still have to drill and tap for the screw handle mounting plate and drill and tap the tool post hole and likely lower that area a bit as well.

Anyways here are 3 pics.

finished-dovetail.jpg taping-gib-screw-holes.jpg semi-finished.jpg

finished-dovetail.jpg taping-gib-screw-holes.jpg semi-finished.jpg
 
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pdentrem

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Finished. Only broke 1 tap too. ::)

I cut the the slide to give me about 1/4" more extension. As it is made of steel and not cast iron, it should not be a problem. Total travel of about 2 3/4". Note that there is not T-slot just a threaded hole. Sure simplifies things.

Here are the final pics.

front-nose.jpg gib-side.jpg max-extension.jpg all-the-way-back.jpg

front-nose.jpg gib-side.jpg max-extension.jpg all-the-way-back.jpg
 
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ChuckB

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Thanks for posting this. Maybe one day when I get a milling machine, I will attempt stuff like this. Until then I will keep practicing on my lathe. :)
 

Amigo

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Pdentrem, Nice Work & lots of it. 8)

Questions: What was the source & brand name for the dovetail cutter you used?
I don't have a SB, and can't tell from the pix, are those DT's 45 deg. or 60 deg.?

CDCO has a set of DT cutters, but the price is so low compared to Enco (Import), I'm reeeaal leery. :-\

Thanks for sharing!
 
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pdentrem

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

The dovetail cutter was from Doall and 1/2" by 60 degree. As the dovetail is approx. .300" deep you need 3/8" or bigger.
You will not take a full pass the first time thru, I took about 4 passes to rough out the dovetail and then used light cuts to fit the male DT to the new female DT with the gib in place.

Hope that answers your questions.
 

Amigo

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

PD, Thank you! You answered then all. I appreciate the good feed back and tips.
 

pdentrem

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I added a bit of information here as a step by step for future use. The included picture hopefully help with the previous pictures.

As per the pictures

1. Square up the steel on the 4 major sides, it doesn't need to be perfect, as you will see. The ends will be done at the end.

2. Rough out the dovetail and screw nut channel with a straight rougher. I made the DT channel about .030" deeper than original. This is to allow for cleanup mentioned in step 7.

3. Set up the dovetail cutter and take a few passes to clear out the majority of the material on both sides. Remember that with the cutter having a taper it will want to move down. Check your tool holder/collet for oil etc that will allow slipping of the tool. Remember that you are only feeding the tool sideways to deepen the cut, NOT down!

4. When the cutter starts to cut full depth of the dovetail take smaller cuts to make a smoother cut.

5. Remember to fit the male DT with the gib in place but no screws on the gib. You want the best fit that allows for future adjustment.

6. Take a couple of free passes to take care of any spring in the tool. When done you will likely have .001 to .002" clearance if all went well. Remember that if you have extra clearance it is not the end of the world, that is what the gib and screws are there to do.

7. Now that the dovetail is done DO NOT REMOVE FROM MACHINE YET! You want to face the running surface of the slide with everything the same as when you cut the DT. Put in a flat end mill and face the 2 sliding surfaces of the slide. This ensures that the DT and the sliding surface of the slide are parallel to each other.

8. Now you can flip the slide over and place on parallels if you need to clear the vice. Make sure the vice and/or parallels are square to the mill and then face the top of the slide to finish. At this point I did mill the 2 ends to square them up.

9. Note that I did not put in a T-slot for the tool post. As the top slide is only 3" wide the post would only fit properly with a centrally located hole anyway. My tool post used a 9/16" X 18 TPI mounting hole other sets will vary i.e. 14mm X 1.5.

10. I moved the slide to the surface grinder to finish the top surface and then bead blasted the 5 sides that one sees but not the running surface. The running surface I lapped on a glass plate with extra fine grit until most but not all the machining makes were removed. I wanted some marks to remain, as these will hold some oil for lubrication.

11. Thread the gib screw holes and the slide screw holder bracket holes. Broken all edges and on the DT edges I removed some more there as a sharp edge is not needed and you may need the DT corner clearance for the male DT. I ended up with about .015" clearance above the male DT and the corners are clear of any possible rubs as well.

Done. I did blacken the slide with a phosphate coating for some rust protection.

compound slide.jpg

compound slide.jpg
 
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pdentrem

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I thought you guys might like to see the finished part, so here are a few pictures showing it and NEW dial as well. Note the difference in the size of the old to new dial.

dials.jpg mounting-plate-and-old-dial.jpg new-dial.jpg beautiful.jpg compound-all-done.jpg

dials.jpg mounting-plate-and-old-dial.jpg new-dial.jpg beautiful.jpg compound-all-done.jpg
 
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ChuckB

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

A functioning work of art! Good Job !
 

pdentrem

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Thanks
Using the diameter of the 3 jaw chuck that I was using to hold the new dial blanks, I used a drawing program (ie Autocad) and simply made an array of lines that 100 would equal the circumference and printed on a sheet of paper. In my case it took more than 1 sheet. Using a letter sized sheet I cut the sheet into strips and put two together to get enough to go around the chuck.

Now remember that the sheet has a thickness as well. You have to add that in as well or the divisions will not line up when you wrap the chuck.

Second time was better!

Using the same setup as below. I then scribed a line on the side of the chuck mounting plate at each of the divisions. Therefore I now have a chuck that is permanetly marked with 100 spaces for future projects!

Make up a wire to use as a pointer and mount were it works for you. It will line up with the new lines on the chuck, thus indexing the dial blank.

I then scribed the lines onto the dial blank. Just by moving the carriage back and forth. Use a sharp tool set on its side. A threading tool is what I used with a sharp point. After all the lines were marked I stamped the final numbers using number stamps.

In making the lines you have to pass the tool a couple of times to get enough depth.

Any other questions? Did I forget something? Likely
Hope this helps!
 

pdentrem

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Well, on Saturday I sold the Atlas lathe, as I have picked up a 14x40 to replace it. The buyer was not interested in the Power Crossfeed carriage. As I sold the lathe as purchased, the new top slide that I made in this thread was not sold with the lathe.

If any Atlas users are interested in the carriage or the top compound slide, send me a PM. Otherwise I will sell it on one of the auction sites either complete or parted out.

Now I have to get the new machine in the shop before the snow flies. Build a new concrete pad and building, soon I hope.
 

Blogwitch

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

Such a shame you sold your Atlas, I nearly cried when I let mine go, it had given me years of faithful and accurate service.
I was going to post a few pictures of mods that I had done to mine, until I saw you had sold it.

Like yourself, I went for a larger swing lathe.

We all have to move on at some time.

John
 

pdentrem

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Re: Replacement Compound slide for Atlas 10" lathe

I know how one feels. The lathe was in the shop for 20 yrs or so. It had it limits, like Parting off and no heavy cuts, but worked just fine for most of my needs. I could not pass up on the replacement lathe at the price and condition. I did not NEED it but I wanted it.
 

pdentrem

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Yes I did. The buyer of the lathe, wanted it as original so he did not buy the extra carriage and slide. Strange as the extra carriage had the power crossfeed, so he has a 10D with upgraded 10F leadscrew and parts. Just as I had bought it in 1990.
I ended up selling the 10F carriage assembly and slide, to a guy in Saskatoon. The guy there was happy for what he got, as there was not much Atlas stuff in his area.
Pierre
 

caveBob

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pdentrem, I just wanted to bump this for anyone that may not have seen it. And to thank you for recording the build for posterity. Google found this thread for me this morning when checking to see what other folks may have already done, looking for ideas. Also sorry you had to sell it, but such is life some times eh... Appreciate it...
 

Privateer

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Pierre,

A question regarding that new dial you made. The factory dial uses a set screw to hold in place relative to the screw, how did you do the same with your larger one? I ask because I do not see a keyway cut or set screw on yours. TIA.

Terry
 

pdentrem

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No set screw and no keyway to lock the dial on the shaft.

What I did was to use a couple Belleville washers, one on each side of the dial. Using the jam nut, this gave me the tension to hold the dial in position and still allow me to rotate it to any mark that I wanted to use.
Pierre
 

pipehack

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pdentram, Nice work. I mean REALLY nice. You could start making those for the folks on here...:)) Hint hint. Not that I need one, but you know how it is. I suffer from tool envy....:man:
 

Privateer

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Belleville washers, I had to look that up, I'd never heard of them before. Learn something new every day. :) I'm guessing from the side I can see the washer in, you've got a bit of a recess cut into the part to accept the washer on the other side as well?

Terry
 

pdentrem

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Yes, you can just make out the recess that holds the washer. I did this to have the space required as there is not a lot of space with the nuts and handle etc.
My first attempt I used a couple washers and a leather washer, which does work but needed adjusting a bit too often. I have a picture some where that shows it a bit better. I will try to find it.
Pierre
 

Privateer

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I find the idea of the large dials appealing as the tiny ones from the factory become difficult to see after a time. I've got a tendency to be heavy handed when it comes to lubricating the machine, and since I wear nitrile gloves, the oils get all over the dials making them hard to read.

Terry
 

pdentrem

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Hard to read! You are kidding me! The factory ones are the best thing since slice bread!

Here is a few more pictures, showing the Crossfeed dial as well. The recess was cut deeper to fit the leather clutch and washer assys. I later subbed with the before mentioned Belleville washers. The installed picture was before I made up an pointer for the larger dial. I do not have a photo of that. If you look closely at the end of the lead screw, you can see that there is not much thread sticking out. That is why you need to recess the clutch assy into the dial. Note the old dial fits in the recess!
Pierre

Clutch-Components.jpg Crossfeed-Dial-on-Saddle.jpg dial-sizes.jpg Crossfeed-Dial.jpg
 

Privateer

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I will be copying your design as closely as I'm able, Pierre. Thank you for the pictures. Though, I'm curious what you used to index the 100 lines, as my bull gear has 60 IIRC.

Terry
 

pdentrem

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Earlier I made mention of marking the edge of the backing plate for the chuck with 100 lines. I used those scribed lines and a wire to indicate. I then rotated the chuck one line at a time and scratched a line into the dials with the carriage. Since you are not powering the lathe the chuck stays in place and to be extra sure, you can snub it be holding the belts taut to help resist rotation.
Here is a picture of said chuck with the divisions scribed onto the back plate. There is a bit of variation between marks but at this diameter they represent a very small amount on the actual dials. Naturally this could be done on a rotary table, if one has one.
Pierre

divided-back-plate.jpg
 
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