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Shape-Rite 8" shaper

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amuller

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#1
I have one of these. There is a manual on this site although I think I have an earlier model. I've been over it but not run it yet. Got it without motor or mount. Have ginned something up out of plywood to get started. The book calls for a 3/4 hp 1125 (six pole) motor. Anybody here have one of these? Any tips would be appreciated, and especially detailed photos of the motor mount.

Thanks.
 

Bi11Hudson

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#2
I don't know for sure, but with that small a motor I would guess at a NEMA-56 frame. That or a "C" flange if it was a custom job. A NEMA-56 base is fairly common for fractional horsepower motors. If you don't find the exact replacement, it should be fairly easy to cobble one up from any number of electric motor suppliers.

The six pole motor is a whole different ball of wax. My suggestion would be a four pole "farm duty" motor and juggle the pulley sizes to slow it down. A Baldor motor will be NEMA-56...... I have a few on my machines, they are TEFC, totally enclosed fan cooled, single phase, 120/240 volt, reversable. Of course, if you have 3 phase, well......

You might find one used that would work, but hang on to your wallet if you're looking for one at 1125 RPM new. With a 4 pole / 1745RPM motor, figure on about $200 bux. If you need to have it shipped, that's more. It's quite heavy......

WWGrainger is another option here, for both motor and mount.
 

amuller

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#3
Right now I have a 56 frame 1/2 hp DC motor on it. I really like the idea of being able to ramp up the speed from zero as I'm frankly a bit intimidated by the machine and the possibility of a collision that could break something. It has a step pulley on the machine but I didn't get the motor pulley. I think it is a maska step pulley (iron, not die cast) and they are still available but expensive. Agree that six pole motors are relatively scarce but they do turn up once in a while at sales and such.
 

eeler1

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#4
The Shape Rite's are nice machines, a bit more robust than the little Atlas shapers.

The motor basically hangs off the back, the weight of the motor tensions the belt to the step pulley. In a way, it's a safety feature that mitigates the collision potential. But, abrupt starts can cause motor bounce for a few cycles if the motor is too light or not at the optimal angle.

Here's some pictures, not all my shape rite (sold it, dammit!!) and not saying this was an original motor or frame. I ended up making a kind of hillbilly frame (I don't weld, which would have made it way easier), but it worked.
 

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amuller

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#5
Thank you! I notice the motor is mounted on a platform. This makes me think the original motor was a larger frame size than the 56 frame (look like) in the pics and has been raised to maintain the shaft height. What do you think?

Alan
 

eeler1

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#6
well, when these machines were made, motors were bigger and heavier than the modern equivalent HP motor. My motor was a ‘Westinghouse’, iirc, don’t recall the HP, but it had some heft to it.

All I had was a bracket off the back of the machine, with the two holes for the frame shaft, and had to make the platform and the rest of it. Like I say, the motor is not fixed in place, which gives you some flexibility, height of the pulley doesn’t matter much.

I think you have to make the platform and mount the motor, it’s wide open how you get it done.
 

amuller

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#7
A little more poking around online suggests that the original motors for these might have been 203 or 204 frame. These would have a center ht of 5" as opposed to the 3.5" ht of a modern 56 frame motor. And this seems pretty consistent with how far eeler1 seems to have raised his motor in the pics above. And, of course, these motors would be a good bit heavier and tension the belt more.

Other point: the manuals online seem to be for the "B" model shaper but the one I have, I think, is the earlier model which has the pulleys on the other side and a different shaped access door. Anybody up on the differences and have paperwork on the earlier models?

Thanks!
 

amuller

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#8
So, my machine is a model HD, S/N 761 or 781. I don't find any wear on it. It has the rotating table and came with an Armstrong #39 tool holder. Things I could use to make it really complete and original:

-- table support--the pin and the bridge pieces.
-- motor bracket and table.
-- 6 pole motor 3/4 or 1 hp.
-- motor pulley. The groove spacing on these iron step pulleys is wider than the typical die cast pulley, and *may* correspond to the Maska (Baldor) iron step pulleys such as the MAS52 (but the diameters of that item don't seem right).
-- Paperwork. I can only find the Model B stuff online.

Wiring comes next. Wondering where people think best to put the start-stop push button station. These machines have a lot of moving parts and pinch points--seems the switch should be in an easy-to-reach location, not down on the stand....

Alan
 

Uncle Buck

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#9
No pictures to share, but I have an 8" Shape Rite with a rotating table, and a 7" Atlas. The Shape Rite is far heavier and more robust than my Atlas.
 

erokc

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#10
Alan, have you got your Shape-Rite running?
I found an early model that I should have possession of in a week. I have been studying pictures and deduced that there are about three versions of the early model. Primary differences are in the castings and base. I will get a "later" early model. The B model has the drive belts on the right side and I can't see any other differences. I of course have not examined any of the machines, just scrutinized bunches of pictures.

I have already thought of two modifications I want to do. I will start a thread for those to see if anyone else has thought of doing the same.

I know you are concerned about safety as you should be. After a set-up use the hand wheel and cycle the ram by hand to check for collisions. Hopefully it doesn't take too long to do that. One of my modifications should make it safer and easy to check your set-up under power.
 

amuller

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#11
Hi. I have the machine in running order but haven't got started learning how to use it. I put a DC motor and drive on it so it can be inched around. I need to make the table support pieces. This winter, I hope.....
 

erokc

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#12
Hi. I have the machine in running order but haven't got started learning how to use it.
There should be plenty of assistance from the forum members including myself. What I always put first is safety. The shaper is one machine that can do serious damage so NEVER put your hands in the work area when it is running. Safety glasses are a must as it can shatter tool steel if a collision occurs.

My first job will be making soft jaws for a milling vice. Cutting V grooves at angles in aluminum should be a good exercise for the shaper. Maybe a set of steel stepped jaws so I don't have to clean chips around parallels when I change parts.

One of my proposed modification may require gears. The shaper is excellent for one off gears (requires a fixture).
CAN'T WAIT!
 
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