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Sheldon UM-56-P

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earthbound

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#1
Hi folks. I just picked up a new lathe to replace my old Atlas. It's a Sheldon UM-56-P. I have a problem though: I don't have a 220V power source to my garage like I thought I did. In fact, I have one breaker running to my garage. Is it a bad idea to put a 110V 1 HP motor in this thing for the time being? Im moving out of my parents' house soon, as I'm fresh out of college. They refuse to let me do any electrical work like running a 220V breaker out to the garage and im pretty sure the lathe currently has a 2 HP motor so a VFD would fall short on the horsepower... Or would it? Any advice on getting this thing up and running? Thanks!
 

mzayd3

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#2
Try it and see...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

earthbound

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#3
I don't have a 1 HP motor at my disposal at the moment. I don't want to buy this motor unless I get a second opinion.
 

wa5cab

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#4
I'm not really familiar with Sheldon machines, but if a 1HP motor is really too small for the machine, I wouldn't put one on it. Although the wire won't be cheap, if (a) your parent's house has an electric dryer and if (b) the layout of the house and garage is such as to make it practical, and if (c) they'll let you do it, you could buy enough of probably #8-3 extension cord (SJOOW 600 V) and the necessary connectors to run a temporary cord from the dryer outlet to the lathe. Just don't work late and go to bed forgetting to plug the dryer back in!
 

earthbound

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#5
They simply don't trust me to do any work, so that's out. Does anyone run a 13" lathe with a 1 HP motor? Im too inexperienced to know if that'll be too weak.
 

ACHiPo

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#6
You can run up to a 1 1/2 HP motor on 110/15A circuit. It certainly won't hurt anything to use a 1 HP or 1 1/2 HP motor, and for smaller work will likely be fine. If you find the motor stalls you you blow the breaker on a lot of stuff, then you know you need a motor with more poo, but I suspect you'll be fine most of the time.
 

Chipper5783

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#7
Umm, start by finding out what you have for a motor. Is it single phase or 3 phase (is that why you mentioned the VFD? A VFD is not applicable to single phase applications)? Is this a dual voltage motor (120/240)? What the rated horse power and current? With that information, we can provide some meaningful options that would be applicable to your situation.
 

wa5cab

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#8
EA,

David C is correct in that you should determine what you have on it. However, it's smaller than I had assumed. I have a 12" Atlas 3996 (same as Craftsman 12" Commercial). It has a 3/4 HP motor on it and I've never stalled it. So I would think that a 1 HP would be sufficient.
 

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#9
Umm, start by finding out what you have for a motor. Is it single phase or 3 phase (is that why you mentioned the VFD? A VFD is not applicable to single phase applications)? Is this a dual voltage motor (120/240)? What the rated horse power and current? With that information, we can provide some meaningful options that would be applicable to your situation.
+1 I was too quick to offer a solution when the problem statement wasn't clear
 

earthbound

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#10
I don't have the motor in front of me as the machine has not yet been delivered. I highly doubt this thing would be dual voltage. It's three phase which is why I was toying with the notion of a VFD, however at 2 HP or even 1.5, i don't think id be able to power it on 110V. Am I wrong in saying that 1 HP at 110V isn't going to perform like 1 HP at 220V 3PH? I don't want to power this lathe like my Atlas because I don't want it to perform like my Atlas. I can get a 1 HP Baldor motor that will be 110V single phase drawing around 10A for fairly cheap. I just want to do the machine some justice. If the 2 HP motor in it draws like 8 amps at 220V 3PH, I'm not sure how I'd reasonably power it. Realistically, would 1 HP at 110V single phase be ok?
 

wa5cab

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#11
Dual voltage 3-phase motors aren't uncommon. However, the low voltage connection would almost certainly be 208 to 230 volt and the high voltage 440 to 460. Actual 120 volts 3-phase isn't impossible to make either power or motor but I don't know that I've ever actually seen either one. Commercially available (mostly Chinese) VFD's that run off of a 120 V single phase line are normally going to output 208 to 230 V Wye connected 3-phase. Which would more than likely match the motor on the lathe unless it is wound only for 277/440 V 3-phase. How likely it is to be the latter depends mainly upon where it started life (from small machine shop to large factory). You are just going to have to look at it and find out.
 

earthbound

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#12
So I guess the overarching question is whether or not a 1 HP single phase motor at 110V would be an acceptable substitute at least until I can find a way to get access to a 220V 1PH line and then get a VFD for 3PH capabilities. Isnt 1HP at 110V single phase a weaker motor than 1HP at 220V single phase? I can't seem to get a good answer on that no matter who I ask.
 

wa5cab

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#13
EA,

As I thought I wrote earlier, 1 HP is 1 HP whether created from 120 V single phase, 240 V single phase, 208 V 3-phase or by a geared gas turbine. That's all assuming that the supply to the motor (or engine) is adequate for the load. The over all efficiency may be marginally better at 240 V but otherwise, they would perform the same.
 

earthbound

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#14
Thanks for all the advice so far, folks. The machine is going to be delivered in two days. I'm thinking for the time being that it'd be best to power the machine with a 1.5 HP 110V single phase motor. Once I move out, I'll get a 220V line and use either a VFD or a rotary phase converter to get the job done. The logic of my concern with the weaker motor is that I don't want this thing to perform like a SB 10K, hence I dont want to power it like a south bend 10K. The side-by-side cuts I made on the Sheldon I ended up buying made the SB feel like a toy.
 
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