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Shop First Aid Kit

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MozamPete

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#1
What do people keep in their shop first aid kit?
I work in my home workshop alone most of the time and realize there is a lot of opertunity for things to go pretty bad, pretty quickly. I have several fire estingushers, l’m wiring emergency stops into my machines as I update the control, but I don’t actually even have a box of bandaids in the shop (the first aid kit is in the house).
So I figure I should equip a workshop specific first aid kit. I’m thinking field dressing for major cuts, and especially things you can apply yourself if needed, eye wash, something for burns, etc
What do others have/suggest?
 
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David S

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#2
My workshop is in the basement of the house so not too far away from first aid stuff. The only thing I have in the shop are band aids. Sometimes no matter how hard I try to avoid getting cut, I sometimes get a splinter or get a small nick that bleeds like crazy.

I always wear full safety glasses in the shop, with face shield if grinding. I don't use much in the way of chemicals, however just outside the door in the laundry area I have a flexible hose on the laundry tubs that could be used for eye wash.

It sounds like you are already doing a lot of preventive things and I would encourage everyone to think of what could go wrong before they approach doing things they haven't done before.

David
 

brav65

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#3
I would think of a major catastrophe that would require a tourniquet, an Israeli pressure bandage, celoc...etc. for a little cut I would want to go in the house and clean it well. I carry an edc bag with all of those things plus some bandaids, Tylenol etc. that bag goes everywhere with me. Everyone laughs at my murse (man purse) but I have used it so many times I could not even count.
 

Billh50

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#4
Since I am close to the emergency stuff, the only things I keep in the shop area are a clean rag to throw over those nasty cuts, bandaids and super glue. The clean rag is only so I don't leave a blood trail through the house. The wife tends to get upset when she see a trail of blood. I don't know why.
 

CluelessNewB

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#5
Paper towels and electrical tape for minor cuts! Keeping some of the clotting sponges around might be prudent for a serious injury. Phone to call 911.
 

kvt

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#6
shop, the paper shop towels and tape, in the house most other stuff, including surgical super glue. Most times just using the tape etc works better than a banband does. but normally will go into the house and wash it out then bandage it up as needed. Have a skin condition and have to patch splits etc all the time.
 

mikey

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#7
The number 1 emergency piece of kit for those of us (probably most of us) who work alone in our shops is a cell phone. If something catastrophic happens you are not going to be handling it by yourself. Call 911, grab something to soak up blood and apply pressure to the wound until help arrives. Sit down on the floor because if its bad enough to call 911, there is a good chance you're going into shock soon.

The best "kits" I've seen come from these guys: https://mymedic.us/collections/first-aid-kits. Lots of kits available. I suggest you choose based on your level of competence; it does no good if you don't know how to use something, even if it is there. This especially applies to a tourniquet. If you ever use a first aid kit, replace any item you used as soon as possible.

The vast majority of injuries in the shop are minor ones - cut, scratch, small burn, splinter, etc. These are injuries that can be treated by you, with one hand.
  • Time: as soon as an injury occurs you need to stop what you're doing and treat it, now. Don't slap a band aid on it and get to it later; that invites infection. If you treat a wound effectively within the first few minutes the risk of infection is greatly reduced.
  • Help: if it is anything more than a truly minor injury, get someone to help you. At this level of injury you are not going to be thinking clearly - get help. If no help is available and its something you aren't absolutely sure you can manage, call 911.
  • Soap and water: this is the best way to clean and flush a wound, and it is better than alcohol or Betadine when it comes to wound healing.
  • Alcohol and Betadine swabs are good to have. They disinfect and sterilize a wound and the area around it when you cannot get to soap and water. You cannot effectively flush a wound with these but for minor cuts or scratches, they work. Clean the wound and at least several inches around the wound.
  • Triple Antibiotic Ointment: get it at the drug store and replace annually. Apply with a Q-tip, not your grubby fingers that are full of bacteria.
  • Band Aids: get the waterproof, fabric type. The others are a waste of money for a shop guy.
  • Paper Tape: 3M Micropore tape is one of the best tapes to have. It will hold on a dressing and can be used in place of a band aid. It passes air and water but will not allow bacteria to pass. You have to clean the wound, stop the bleeding, clean again and then apply the tape and allow it to heal under the tape. Works good, especially for skin avulsions where you scrape off some skin but its still hanging on. Clean gently, push the flap of skin back into place, apply some antibiotic ointment and put a piece of paper tape over it. If you leave the tape in place until it heals, you may not be able to see where the wound was unless you really look for it.
  • 4X4, 2X2 gauze pads: good for cleaning up blood, for applying pressure to a wound and for dressing a wound.
  • Stretchy self-adhering tape: better than regular tape to hold a dressing in place.
  • Splinter removal kit, Optivisor so you can see that damned thing.
One of the best first aid items is a good book on first aid, preferably read before you need it. Watch for any signs of infection - redness, heat, pus - you're a guy, you know what an infection looks like. If you see it, go to the doctor.
 

f350ca

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#8
I think the people designing the wrappers for band aids have a really really sick scene of humour. Just try and open that hermetically sealed, stuck with Gorrila glue wrapper with one hand and maybe a couple of fingers of the dripping hand, while your leaking all over the shop.

Greg
 

Silverbullet

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#10
I've always kept first aid kits everywhere, my shop and house have large sets. Each vehicle has a small set up. I've had some nasty cuts and punctures , burns are almost a weekly thing . I keep antibiotic ointment , ace bandages , bandaids , tweezers , even scalpels until used . Peroxide and alcohol are a must . Finger cots , and the stick on cut sutures for nasty deep cuts.
 

cg285

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#11
masking tape, duct tape if the masking tape doesn't work, oil dry for the blood spots on the concrete
scribe or razor blade for the metal splinters
 

Aaron_W

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#13
First aid kits are great, but they do little good if you don't know what to do with it. If you have some how made it this far in your life without formal training, or if it was 15+ years ago in high school then get yourself into a first aid and CPR class. They are fairly inexpensive and can literally save a life.

Things change, cutting edge medical treatment 20 years ago has in some cases become available to the individual. Techniques that were thrown out in years past (I'm thinking tourniquets in particular) have come back in favor. Others taught in the past (inducing vomiting with syrup of ipecac) have been found less than helpful in the home setting.

A very basic class is about 4 hours, more advanced might run 8 and you can get the basic level of training required of first responders with a 3-4 day commitment. I will always steer people towards a real live person instructing and providing hands on practice, but there are plenty of basic classes available online. I've even seen an online class for first aid for cats and dogs (treating them, not teaching them :) ).


I would think of a major catastrophe that would require a tourniquet, an Israeli pressure bandage, celoc...etc.
Hopefully it would never be needed, but particularly for those with larger machines capable of causing massive injury not a bad addition. As people age the bodies ability to control bleeding can be impaired as well. An injury a healthy young person might shake off could be lethal to an older person or one taking medications that might impair bleeding control (blood thinners etc).


Not trying to be funny or gross, but a few quart or gallon ziplock bags could also be helpful for collecting bits removed by a machine were a serious human to machine contact to occur and remove parts you are fond of.
 

Groundhog

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#14
I should probably do better but I keep a box of band-aids and a bottle of skin super glue in my toolbox. The super glue doesn't work until the bleeding stops though - so yeah, electrical tape. Man, I have different grades and different colors of that!
 
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