• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE SUPPORT OUR FORUM - UPGRADE YOUR ACCOUNT HERE!
[4]

Shop floor for a shaper

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

63redtudor

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Messages
12
Likes
6
#1
We finnaly got a place and we'll need to build a shop. Does anyone have recomdations for securing a shaper to the floor? Here is my original post: http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/picked-up-a-shaper.49544/
Still haven't found any information about the shaper and still not 100% convinced that its a true 12". Regardless I'm planning on treating the machince as though it is actually a 12" shaper.
Thanks for any input.
 

ghostdncr

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
118
Likes
84
#2
I'd think most any type of common concrete anchor would do the trick. You won't be dealing with massive shear forces at the feet when your shaper is running, so I'd gauge my anchor size based on whatever clearance holes are currently in the machine's feet. In your photos, I can only see the one tab at the front. I'm assuming there's a matching tab on the other side. Is there a third mounting point in the rear of the base?

Congrats on building the new shop! My wife and I are beginning to shop around for a new place and this is something we've discussed, too. It seems I've always dealt with thin, "economically poured" floors in the past and if we end up building, I told her the floor was getting poured a full 24" thick. That should handle any machine I'll setting on it. :cocksure:
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
2,330
Likes
1,402
#3
Mine is a 16inch.
I've heard rumor of them "walking".
That's not been my experience, at least not at the speeds I run.
Level shouldn't be an issue unless you intend to use a precision level for set-ups.
Especially handy with angles.
This would require level to earth (vs level in plane) so you can measure the angles.
A thick slab of concrete would theoretically assist with stability.
The other two issues are:
1) oil drainage, like many vintage iron oil is everywhere. Perhaps I over lubricate....
2) where do I set my coffee, as I sit back listen to bluegrass and watch her...

Daryl
MN
 

f350ca

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,508
Likes
2,617
#4
Interesting shaper, I missed your earlier post. The body and table appear to be made of steel sections rather than cast.
Weight will determine wether it needs to be fixed to the floor. Like Daryl's my 18 inch sits there fine but the 7 inch Logan I had needed to be bolted down, it would walk.

Greg
 

Doubleeboy

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2014
Messages
740
Likes
403
#5
My shaper experience is on smaller shaper, Logan 8". If I crank the feed up I can get it to shake and walk. I refuse to bolt machines down, IMO opinion that causes its own set of issues, I prefer to level the machine and run it in the sweet spot, where it cuts well , does not vibrate or walk. I have seen a 16" shaper take half inch depth of cut at a pretty good clip and it did not shake or walk, it was not bolted down. It cranked out parts on a consistent basis without being bolted to floor.
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
2,330
Likes
1,402
#6
Weight will determine wether it needs to be fixed to the floor.
That's interesting!!
I've associated it with rate and momentum. Perhaps it's a balance against friction on the floor.
I suppose a rough finish on the floor would make a difference.

Daryl
MN
 

f350ca

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,508
Likes
2,617
#7
Your right Daryl. On the smaller machines the mass of the ram is high compared to the frame and base though. On a bigger machine like yours the base is massive compared to the ram so it has less rocking effect.

Greg
 

63redtudor

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Messages
12
Likes
6
#8
24" thick floor might be a LITTLE bit more than I can afford! Would be nice though...
I ask as I've also heard of larger shapers 'walking.' Whether or not this one would is hard to say, I'd just rather make sure I'm set up for it if it could.
- f350ca I originally thought that the body and table were built up from plate, but they are actually cast. I suspect that it was a kit of some sort with some locally produced parts (Denver did have some foundaries in the early 1900s). There is a shaper on ebay right now ( http://www.ebay.com/itm/metal-shaper/162456326061 ) that looks vaguely along the lines of mine, but thats the closest I've found. Hopefully when I have the chance I'll be able to tear into the thing and finally figure something out.
 

f350ca

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,508
Likes
2,617
#9
I'd say get it going and see if it needs bolted down. Easy to drill the floor and add anchors after. 4 inches of 5000 psi cement would be plenty, I opted for 6 inch but the chap that poured it thought I was crazy.
There seamed to be quite a few small manufacturers back then. Mine is a Peerless made in Guelph Ontario. Haven't been able to find any info on it, but have found at least 3 other people who have ones made by them. A smaller one and one the same size as mine but not having a rotating table.
Never weighed mine but from hauling it and moving it around Im guessing its in the 4000 pound range, it doesn't budge in high gear.

Greg
 

cjtoombs

Active User
Active Member
Joined
May 10, 2012
Messages
534
Likes
157
#10
I've got a 24" Cincinnati that sit's on 4 3"x3"x 3/4" steel plates with a knurl on the bottom side. It hasn't moved, and I run it pretty hard. I have a 7" Atlas that is on an old steel schoolteacher desk that has wheels on it and I can't run it any speed other than low or it's all over the place. It was mentioned before, but weight and friction with the ground probably have a lot to do with it. If you use a high friction foot (such as a rubber that would conform to the concrete floor or steel with a knurl on the bottom) you may not need to bolt it down. I like putting my machines on wheels, so I avoid bolting through welding projects to create machine subframes with casters and feet.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top