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[4]

Short circuit test

January Project of the Month [3]
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jim18655

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#31
Upon further review of the picture, it appears only the top is connected. Also must be a 240v connection since there is equal output on both slots.

Seriously though, a volt tick would only indicate a faulty ground if the machine was live and also not grounded. A volt tick won't have anything to sense on an open ground only.
 

JPMacG

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#32
I was trying to find a resource to see how many deaths there are in the USA from in home electrical shocks. It's very hard to find a clear answer. Maybe they want it that way. I am not talking about the idiot who puts a ladder on the high voltage line or a work place accident; just the regular kind of shock you get from a plug or appliance. Some sources also lump in deaths from electrical fires also to inflate the figures. Water seems to be the biggest factor in death versus injury. My suspicion is the number is very low. Looks like Ireland averages about 1 per year.
Robert
I think deaths from household service are rare, and usually involve water, e.g. a bathtub or wet floor. 120V is not enough to cause a fatality through dry skin in most situations. The larger danger (I can attest to this personally) is when you get a shock and jump back, hitting your head on a concrete wall or fall off a ladder.
 

rwm

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#33
Agreed. I looked at the CDC data and it seems to be exclusively work place deaths.
Robert
 

Tony Wells

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#34
I thought maybe it was a kludged connection for a water cooled TIG torch.
 

rwm

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#35
I think deaths from household service are rare, and usually involve water, e.g. a bathtub or wet floor. 120V is not enough to cause a fatality through dry skin in most situations. The larger danger (I can attest to this personally) is when you get a shock and jump back, hitting your head on a concrete wall or fall off a ladder.
Yes, my wife was helping me one time and she got a 120v shock. I almost got killed as a result.
R
 
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