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Southbend 14" 2H Lathe

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HoustonIV

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#1
Lil H Valve seat Cutting.jpg

Hi, Just joined up. I picked up a Southbend 2H Turret Lathe yesterday and added it to our shop. Any manuals concerning operating instructions would be most graciously appreciated
 

HoustonIV

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#4
Thank you vocatexas, I have the brochures from this site, been a member since I re-conditioned my Frays all angle mill 6 years ago. The southbend manuals there were mostly engine lathes, I have a 13x60 and all manuals for these lathes. I was hoping for the actual turret information
 

Janderso

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#5
That is one sweet lathe you have there sir.
 

HoustonIV

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#8
cvairwerks, Thank you, I have been following texasgunsmith for a while now and have all the parts manuals etc he has, looking for the operator's guide to assure that I do not break anything while doing the initial run to verify tolerances
 

markba633csi

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#9
Is that your son there grinding valves? I like the determined look on his face
Mark
 

HoustonIV

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#10
Hi Markba633csi,, the Lil Dude loves his work! Thank you
 

markba633csi

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#11
Heh heh reminds me of me when I was that age
 

P. Waller

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#12
Do you have a product or operation that will requires such a machine?
I like turret lathes, often do several operations in an engine lathe then do the end drilling and tapping of the parts in a turret lathe, much faster way to go about it, they can not be beat for this type of manual operation. If it has a powered turret feed one may drill holes very rapidly.
 
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brino

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#13
First, Welcome to the Hobby-Machinist!

Second, Do you have a model number or catalog number, for the lathe?

-brino
 

FOMOGO

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#14
Welcome to the forum, and that is a nice solid looking rig. I have several sets of those New-way carbid seat cutters. I mostly run mine with a half inch drill and an adapter I made, but have been gathering parts for a setup to use them on the Bridgeport. You might check here for turret info, just the first one that I picked. Mike
 

HoustonIV

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#16
I do not know why I laughed when I found out this unit was delivered to a chuck manufacturer
 

HoustonIV

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#17
Welcome to the forum, and that is a nice solid looking rig. I have several sets of those New-way carbid seat cutters. I mostly run mine with a half inch drill and an adapter I made, but have been gathering parts for a setup to use them on the Bridgeport. You might check here for turret info, just the first one that I picked. Mike

I like the Neway tooling,, I have tinkered with an old jewler's dremel that is foot operated and allows the hands free for cutting,, I will send pictures of the next head an Isuzu diesel
 

HoustonIV

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#18
Do you have a product or operation that will requires such a machine?
I like turret lathes, often do several operations in an engine lathe then do the end drilling and tapping of the parts in a turret lathe, much faster way to go about it, they can not be beat for this type of manual operation. If it has a powered turret feed one may drill holes very rapidly.

I do have products to manufacture, Sailing vessel sheaves out of aluminum and delrin,,, most of the rig manufactures are out of business and getting replacement sheaves is difficult

I am converting the motor to 240/3P for continuity with my Bridgeport and other tooling but hope to be up fully running in a month
 

P. Waller

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#20
Turret lathes are perfect for that kind of work and are simple to operate, most have a turret feed, cross slide feed and carriage feed all with stops. All that I have seen have threaded stop rods sticking out of the back of the turret, one for each position, one of the drawbacks of these machines is that you can't load long stock from the front because the turret is in the way so leave ample room behind it to back load through the spindle.

I was running this old W & S today, in order to load stock longer then about 48" I have to push it through the guide tube from the back, it is 5 1/2" thru the spindle and I face a lot of conveyor rollers and shafting with it. use a piece of aluminum or steel bar to push the parts through the guide tube and spindle. These machines are fantastic for drilling large holes shorter then the turret travel, they will easily push the stock through the chuck so keep it as tight as possible.

On this machine the blue and yellow guide tube has a rotating spider on the end and will slide along the round bar ways with a hydraulic cylinder which is handy with long heavy solid bars. To control the end of the stock in Z place a flat ended stop bar in one of the turret positions and set the turret stop, After the finished part is parted off push the the stock out until it hits the stop bar, retract the turret, rotate it and knock out the next one.

 

HoustonIV

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#21
Turret lathes are perfect for that kind of work and are simple to operate, most have a turret feed, cross slide feed and carriage feed all with stops. All that I have seen have threaded stop rods sticking out of the back of the turret, one for each position, one of the drawbacks of these machines is that you can't load long stock from the front because the turret is in the way so leave ample room behind it to back load through the spindle.

I was running this old W & S today, in order to load stock longer then about 48" I have to push it through the guide tube from the back, it is 5 1/2" thru the spindle and I face a lot of conveyor rollers and shafting with it. use a piece of aluminum or steel bar to push the parts through the guide tube and spindle. These machines are fantastic for drilling large holes shorter then the turret travel, they will easily push the stock through the chuck so keep it as tight as possible.

On this machine the blue and yellow guide tube has a rotating spider on the end and will slide along the round bar ways with a hydraulic cylinder which is handy with long heavy solid bars. To control the end of the stock in Z place a flat ended stop bar in one of the turret positions and set the turret stop, After the finished part is parted off push the the stock out until it hits the stop bar, retract the turret, rotate it and knock out the next one.

Really a nice set up. I have all that it would take to set mine up this way, which would really be good for hydraulic actuator arms prior to chroming. Thank you for sharing P. Waller
 

HoustonIV

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#23
This is a Hall Toledo (Hall Manufacturing) In-Frame Bore Bar. No one at Hall recalls it being made,,, I was told that the Richard Petty Museum has one? any body seen this?
 
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