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Tiny Basement Shop Progress

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Nelson

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I applied sheetrock, then 3/4 inch plywood to the walls to prevent damage.
I installed built-in shelves. I covered the gas main and regulator with a plywood cover. Unfortunately, the gas meter is right on the tailstock of my SB H-10 lathe, which is in pieces here. I need to get Con Ed to move that meter out of the way.

0406180813.jpg

As with the other walls, I first applied green board (old resistant), then 3/4 inch plywood to prevent the Van Norman #12 (shown partially assembled) from smashing up the sheetrock (which it did before the plywood was installed.) Temporary shelves hold some tools.

0406180813a.jpg

Sheetrock is covered with thick 3/4 inch plywood so the Burke #4 does not smash it up. A panel of plywood was split then brought down to the basement and reinstalled.

0406180814.jpg

Thi is the view of the front basement wall from the hallway outside my shop. I made a wooden sliding barn-type door to close up the shop area.
0406180814a.jpg
 
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Tony Pisano

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#2
Looking good. You can do a lot with a small space if you are organized.
 
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#3
Nice shop Nelson. I have one small concern though and that is the location of that Gas Meter. Here they check them every 2 years and replace them every 10 years. I have had mine spring a leak. Not bad enough to evacuate but still a leak.

"Billy G"
 

Nelson

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There is a Baldon #520 Carbide grinder, an old one, circa 1960, that is located in the alcove where the power panel is.
 

Nelson

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Nice shop Nelson. I have one small concern though and that is the location of that Gas Meter. Here they check them every 2 years and replace them every 10 years. I have had mine spring a leak. Not bad enough to evacuate but still a leak.

"Billy G"

Con Ed never replaced the meter. That is the original one, and the placement sucks. I'd be happy if it sprung a leak. They would be forced to come right over as an emergency and replace it. I am going to write the Public Service Commission. When that happens, Con Ed responds, and ask that the meter be moved.

Word is they are FINALLY going to put in remote reading, like the water meter. It is about time.
 
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Remote reading will not help per say as the meter will be the same, just a sending unit added. I check mine from time to time using soapy water to find any bubbles. If I see them they will surely get a call. I'm not completely sure but I believe that changing them is mandated by the Federal Government. Call the town hall building dept. They will know for sure.

"Billy G"
 

DougD

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Nice space utilization. What is the size of the shop?
Apparently I missed something, where was your shop set up before?

doug
 

Nelson

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Remote reading will not help per say as the meter will be the same, just a sending unit added. I check mine from time to time using soapy water to find any bubbles. If I see them they will surely get a call. I'm not completely sure but I believe that changing them is mandated by the Federal Government. Call the town hall building dept. They will know for sure.

"Billy G"

Bill,

I think you are right. They didn't follow the law- they don't care. You have to write the PSC before they will do anything.
 

Nelson

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Nice space utilization. What is the size of the shop?
Apparently I missed something, where was your shop set up before?

doug
It is about 10 feet wide by 8 feet deep- very tiny.
It was set up in the same location, but no walls, just plain studs. Nothing to hang anything on .
There were "boxes" for built-in shelves, but they had no backs, so that things fell down behind the shelves, where they were irretrievable.
I put green board everywhere, then thick 3/4 plywood screwed to the studs. You can screw shelves and anything else you want to the plywood.
When you remove the plywood, there are walls, so if someone wants to put it to another purpose when I die, they can.

I removed the old box shelves, and made new shelves with 1x8 boards and plywood backs (3/4"). You can nail things to the backs or do whatever you want. I made some stops for shelves. I intend to put the tooling for the Heavy 10 and the drill presses behind them.
I bought USA made polyurethane floor tiles- the expensive ones- that you can roll a heavy machine over. Need to put those down.
 

DougD

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That should really be an improvement for you, and again good utilization of the space.

doug
 

Old Mud

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#11
Tell them if they don't move it your going to hook it up to your lathe for power !! That should bring them down at least for a look. ;)
 

Nelson

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Con Ed is refusing to move it.

They want me to hire a plumber and do it. That will cost a lot.
I will have to just work around it, and hopefully no leaks happen if I lean into it.
Then Con Ed would be forced to do something. :laughing:
 

Nelson

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I desperately want to get my clock shop and machine shop areas going.
In July, I will be 60. It's about time I did, while I still can work with this stuff.
 

Ray C

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#14
I desperately want to get my clock shop and machine shop areas going.
In July, I will be 60. It's about time I did, while I still can work with this stuff.

Are you thinking about making clocks or repairing them? If you're thinking of making them, what kind do you have in mind? Have you picked-out any plans yet?

If you have a goal in mind then, you can start setting-up the shop specifically to achieve that goal.


Ray
 

Kiwi Canuck

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#15
You should be able to move that meter yourself and have a gas fitter "inspect" it for you.

There is a special pipe dope (or teflon tape) you can buy that is rated for use with Natural Gas.

I do all my own black pipe work for air and gas and if the job is permitted or needs an inspection, I have a gas fitter friend drop by to sign it off.

It's very easy to do and quite fun.

David.
 

Old Mud

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I desperately want to get my clock shop and machine shop areas going.
In July, I will be 60. It's about time I did, while I still can work with this stuff.

Not to worry Nel's, in June i'll be 79 and other than a messed up back and a rebuilt heart i still work in my shop. yahoo.gif

Just a thought, even if Con ed dosn't want to move it you could consider it a safety hazard. There must be some Government agency that could help you ? Maybe Osha ?
 
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Nelson

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When I have the money (this won't be cheap), and am just going to have a licensed plumber do it.
Apparently, there is an inspection, and engineer required in the City of NY (sucks, doesn't it?), so I have to go that route.
I put in the piping for our gas dryer. The fools that owned the house before me were using a rubber hose that was connected with a clamp, and no valve. But this is more extensive, and requires filings by a licensed plumber.
 

Old Mud

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Wow that's scary, a licensed plumber AND an Engineer ?? Good grief !!!
 

Eddyde

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#19
Wow that's scary, a licensed plumber AND an Engineer ?? Good grief !!!
Yup, NYC bureaucracy is a living nightmare... I'm a contractor and moved several gas meters in my time, The most important thing is passing the pressure test, I'd advise the plumber run this test before he does any work, that way you'll know if you have a leak in the existing system if so, and you cannot find it, you can back out of the project (of course only if its an extremely slow leak). Once you do the work the system must have absolutely no leaks or they won't turn your gas back on. I have seen cases of buildings going without gas for months till they found the leak, usually involving ripping open walls and replacing the most of if not the entire system...
 

Ferrous Turner

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#20
Cozy little shop you have there. I always wanted a basement, but they don't build many out here in the west. I converted my garage, as many have, but I'm still running out of space. Material storage is always an issue for me, and for you too I would imagine.
 
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