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11" 1957-2 Refurb

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Dmp2275

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#1
Hi everyone! My name is Dustin and im located in south central Pennsylvania. I just finished a refurb of a Logan 11" lathe a few months back and wanted to post the process here. Some of you may have seen a few of these if you're a member of the yahoo group.

Story: I had a small Atlas lathe that I refurbished a few years back and wanted to upgrade to something I could actually work with steel on (haha). I picked up a Southbend 10k with a ton of tooling for a steal and planned to convert that over to a "toolroom" model by retrofitting the cabinet, bed, and headstock from a lathe in better shape. Long story short, I found a cabinet/bet/headstock in Philly and drove out to get it. I didn't realize it at the time, but I was actually picking the cabinet up from 611 machine sales who deal in tool resale. To my surprise, they had a nice little Logan turret lathe buried in the middle of their lathe selection. I had my heart set on a Logan for a while but just couldn't find one which is why I had settled on the 10k. I made an offer and the owner was gracious enough to let me take the Logan (along with the SB cabinet assembly) and send a check in the following week as I didn't have enough cash with me. I ended up parting the SB out, made a ton of money off the thing and paid for all of the Logan while managing to keep any interchangeable tooling (2 insurgent U chucks, tons of tailstock chucks, steady rest, micrometer stop, etc, etc). That's pretty much where this story begins so ill let the photos do the rest of the talking.. Photos coming shortly
 

Dmp2275

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#2
I guess I should mention that I bought this particular Logan because it was a turret model (1957-2 to be exact) and the bed looked pretty nice. Ultimately, I probably wont ever use the turret so during the restoration process, I added a compound and converted it to a standard screw cutting lathe (ie, model 1955). Still havnt decide what ill do with the turret but probably end up selling it. It takes up a lot of space and I can get anal about having things laying around that I wont use.

The lathe was dirty as all hell as it seems to have been used w/ coolant all its life. That was ok with me as it prevented any rust or major lube related issues. As found:
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Dmp2275

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#3
Packing up and ready to head down the turnpike. This little trailer was sitting at max capacity so it was a nervous ride home, but we made it (with the SB cabinet as well).
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Dmp2275

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#7

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Dmp2275

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#8
After full disassembly, next came cleanup in the parts washer and refurbishing any rough areas + paint. This included replacing all the sealed bearings in the drive unit, new gearbox bushings, new gearbox keyed shaft, clean/re-grease spindle bearings, new felts, new rubbers for the cabinet, etc.

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Dmp2275

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#9

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eeler1

Dang, buggered that up too!!
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#11
Very cool, nice progress. Keep the pics coming. I used to believe that turret lathes used for production would be totally worn out. But I have a similar Logan 912 in process, and yes some things are worn, but the bed actually does not show hardly any wear at all. I figure that once in place, the turret and cross slide don't move until re-set for another job, so actually much less sliding on the bed surface than with a conventional lathe. Just my musings, nothing scientific.
 

FOMOGO

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#12
Looking good on the rebuild. Should be a nice machine when your done. That turret assembly could be very handy if your ever making a run of the same parts. Mike
 

Dmp2275

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#13
Sorry guys, internet took a crap (satellite + storms = no internet).

Mocked cabinet up, made sure everything was square/level, and bolted it together. Mounted casters (for ease of movement.. lathe rests on leveling feet when in place but casters are rated for 400lbs ea). Picked up some really nice leveling feet from McMaster.
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Dmp2275

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#14
Began reassembling everything after paint.. headstock first, made sure back gears were properly aligned and no runout in spindle (its dead nuts!).
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Dmp2275

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#15
Next came the drive unit.. All new sealed Koyo bearings. Just to note, the oem bearings on the drive unit had a metal casing which had allowed crud to get into the bearings over the years. I replaced them with a corresponding part number that uses a rubber seal. Hoping for better bearing life (not like it matters much considering this lathe is from around 1961' and bearings lasted this long). Rubber seals will decrease rated speed a bit but doubt it matters much in this instance. I didnt actually calculate speeds of the shafts but im sure they can handle much more than this lathe runs (max spindle speed 1238rpm). Also note the 3/4hp peerless motor which is 120/220v capable and reversible. If this ever bites the dust im probably going to move to a 1.5hp 3 phase motor with VFD as i think this lathe can handle more power.. plus itd be nice to use a 3400rpm motor and double my top end speed to 2460rpm (or more if i push the vfd past 60hz). It would help with using carbides. Im using a similar setup as described on my bridgeport and absolutely love it. Worst part is calculating actual speeds but its managable.

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Dmp2275

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#16
From here, more assembly..
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Dmp2275

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#17
As noted before, i had to replace one of the gearbox shafts. At the time, i didnt have a mill so i purchased a ground/polished and keyed 5/8" shaft from Mcmaster. I didnt realize it but the OEM Logan shaft does NOT have a standard keyway cut for the shaft size. The key way measured out to 1/8" while the standard keyway size is 3/16". I ended up just using the shaft from Mcmaster and the larger keyway has had no ill effect. Once the gears are fitted, the difference in size is barely noticable considering gear play. I may end up going back and making a shaft from scratch now that i have a mill but i dont think its necessary.
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Dmp2275

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#18
So here is where i ran into a snag. I began assembling the carriage assembly and knew i wouldnt be happy with a rocker tool post. I bought a phase II QCTP to fit onto the lathe in AXA size. So i went to a buddies house to mill the T-nut. While milling, his mini mill burned up the servo motor and control board (ouch $$). I dont have any other friends with milling machines that im willing to ask for help, so i went and did the next most logical thing.. i bought a bridgeport.

This also came from the Philly area. Made in 62' according to the serial number, it has a mitutoyo dro, an updated servo powerfeed on the x axis, came with a bridgeport vice, has a mitsubishi VFD with braking resistor thatll run up to 5hp, and it came with a good bit of tooling including end mills, tool holders, and some other goodies. This thing, in the 4 months ive had it, has been a god send. Best purchase i ever made (along with the lathe)!! So after i got the mill, i had to reassembly and clean everything (took about a week) and then 30 seconds into milling the T-nut, the top pulley bearings locked up. I had heard the bearings making raquet when i tested the mill so i wasnt surprised but that put me down another week while i waited for parts and rebuilt the bridgeport head. Finally, I used the mill to finish up my T-nut.

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Dmp2275

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#19
On with the lathe.. It was moved into its final resting spot and leveled up before i did much more assembly. Got it close to level with a 4' framing level and finished up just insuring there was no twist in the bed by using a machinist level on each end of the bed and making sure it registered at the same spot.

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Dmp2275

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#20
There were a few things i wanted to change on this lathe. I didnt want the production collet closer mounted anymore as i couldnt open the gear cover. Part of the collet closer was a long spindle take up nut so i found an original short one on ebay from a model 1955 (im not comfortable turning threads yet). That allowed me to get the side cover mounted. From here, the lathe was pretty much finished. Then i had to make backing plates for the two chucks i kept from the SB i had parted out.. a 4 jaw insurgent U and a 3 jaw insurgent U set-tru scroll chuck.

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Dmp2275

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#21
I may get blasted for this but after finishing the lathe, i had to tool up since i didnt have much. Im a young guy with student loans, a mortgage, and a pending wedding so i didnt have the money to waste on expensive high end tooling. Ill spend on the important stuff like drills, cutting tools, inserts, etc, but the tooling holders, collets, etc. all came from Shars. It only cost a few hundred to completely tool up for most work and Shars includes accuracy guarantees on this stuff so i know what im getting.. if it doesnt spec out i send it back. I have to say, ive been extremely impressed with the carbide tool holders and the XL AXA QCTP holders as well (using 5/8" shanks). The collets are 5c and i modified my production closer to be used as a standard hand operated closer.

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Dmp2275

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#22
And finally, here it is in action..
This is Heat Treated 4140.
Turning down to 1" diameter to use as table pins for a press im building.
-18.5" of total cut length
-CCMT carbide insert
-1238rpm (max speed)
-.005" feed rate
-roughly 500sfpm (gathered from feedback from other users turning 4140HT on practical machinist).
-around .020" DOC (.040" off total diameter)

The first photo is a video so click to see the cutting process

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Dmp2275

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#24
To be frank, it sucks. It's basically just a little piece of leather that rubs the spindle. This lathe spins down quick enough that I don't think it provides much/any benefit. If I can figure out a way to keep the chuck in place for quick stops, I'd much rather go to a VFD with a braking resistor. On the Bridgeport, I can stop and have the spindle come to a stop in fractions of a second. It's marvelous for rigid power tapping and would be nice for threading too.
 

MBfrontier

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#26
Hey, Dmp2275.

Nice job on your machine restorations. Very nice finish on your 4140 pins.

What kind of paint did you use?

I have a 1957 Logan 11 X 36. I replaced all the jack shaft and spindle bearings and I see you replaced some bearings as well. My strategy was to deal with any of the major components that needed attention and then disassemble and refinish what is left. Mine came with a 3 phase motor that needed new bearings as well. In addition, I decided to go with a VFD to run the three phase motor and wired the on/off forward reverse switch wired directly to the VFD. I added a potentiometer for variable speed which is wired directly to the VFD as well. The lathe came with the same collet closer set up you have for yours and 60 5C collets but I haven't had a chance to do anything with it yet.

Here's where the progress is on mine:
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Dmp2275

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#27
MBfrontier,
I used an alkyd enamel from TSC (tractor supply). It's basically farm implement paint. Colors were IH white (basically a light almond) and MF grey. I've had really good luck with alkyd enamels if they're done right. They take a long time to cure and really do best with a primer (but they're usable without). I really like the grey as its dark with a lot of green in it and looks "vintage". I just finished my 20 ton press and did it in the same grey.
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I must say, I'm a little jealous of your Logan! It has everything that I'm missing: 55" bed, the cabinet I prefer, and a VFD! I also like that belt tensioning mechanism on the drive unit better. Mine seems a little hokey.
 

MBfrontier

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#28
Nice looking 20 ton press. I have one I bought from HF. It's one of those items that I hardly use but, when needed, nothing else will do.

I like your chip pan where it has a lower middle section. Looks like it will make it easier for chip removal. I see some 1957's with a chip pan like yours and others that are flat with a built in steel cup in the rear to accommodate liquid coolant like mine. I don't know if that is a generational design or some type of option where you could pick which chip pan came with the lathe.

My collet closer came mounted on my machine. I'm a rookie hobbyist so I won't be involved in repetitive machining operations so, like you, I took it off to be able to frequently open the cover. Here's a picture of my collet closer and collets that came with this machine:
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You mentioned in a previous post "The collets are 5c and i modified my production closer to be used as a standard hand operated closer." I am very interested in how you modified your collet closer to operate the closing by hand instead of using the lever. Any info you could post in this thread would be appreciated.

My next assembly to address is the QCGB. It runs fine without any issues although I won't know if any of the Oilite bearings are worn until I get it apart.

Good luck on using your machines.
 

Dmp2275

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#29
I do a lot of automotive work so the press gets used a fair amount. I had a little HF 12 ton and i became tired of pumping the jack handle in short order so i built this 20 ton with an air/hydraulic jack. I disassembled the jack and mounted a pressure gauge and put draw tubes in it so it can be used upside down. Sure is nice just hitting a button!

Before i get to the collet closer, id recommend disassembling your gearbox asap. mine seemed "fine" when i first checked it out but almost every bushing was worn through and the 5/8" shaft that the levers ride on was severely worn. Just a side note, McMaster Carr has every bushing and the 5/8" keyed shaft i needed. total cost was like $25. I did upgrade to the iron based Oilite bushings as they seemed to be rated for higher loads.

Collet closer mods:
1) remove the set screws and pull the old bearing blocks off the draw tube. They may be a light press fit.
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2) take a bunch of measurements and figure out where your new handle will sit on the draw tube. There are steps where the bearings mount so if the handle will sit over these, youll need to turn them down to match the diameter of the rest of the tube. Just a note on this, the center hole in my insurgent U 4-jaw wasn't large enough to pass the draw tube back through the spindle so i ended up using a 3 jaw set-tru chuck. I centered it as close as i could but it still a thou or two offcenter where i turned the steps down. Not noticeable during use..
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3) Make a handle for the draw tube. I used a chunk of 3" aluminum. Part stickout is pretty far on this but didn't have any issues. I bored the center hole first for a snug fit on the draw tube. Then i wacked the end off on my bandsaw (that i also restored). Back to the lathe, created a step on the end of the handle that fits into the taper on the back of the spindle.
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4) Drilled 2 holes in the handle (one on either side) and thread 5/16-18. These are for set screws to hold the handle in place. To prevent the handle from going anywhere, i marked the holes on the draw tube and milled flats that the set screws fit into on the draw tube. I left the tube long at first until i could try it out, then i knocked like 4" off the end. I left around 1.5" of drawtube sticking past the handle as i plan to make a spyder to hold long objects out the backside (thinking rifle barrel)
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Dmp2275

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#30
Here's a project i started with collets:

Draw tube cut down:
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-6al-4v titanium, turning to 1.125" to fit largest collet.
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Where it sits now:
On its way to being a wedding ring..
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