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3D Printer

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Gadget

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#1
I've spent the last few weeks making a 3D print head for my CNC table. The table will now do routing/ light milling/ plasma cutting/ hot wire foam cutting/ and now 3D printing. I used the 2BEIGH3 print head instructions on instructables.com and found the setup fairly easy. The hardest part was configuring LinuxCNC for a linear 4th axis. No small feat but with their forum help I got through it.
This video is the second attempt at printing. It's just a shallow tray to test the calibration of the extruder.

[video=youtube_share;hRyJybyU3lk]http://youtu.be/hRyJybyU3lk[/video]
 
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DMS

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#2
Excelent! I have been contemplating a similar project recently. What software are you using to generate the gcode?
 

Gadget

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#3
Excelent! I have been contemplating a similar project recently. What software are you using to generate the gcode?
I'm using slic3r to generate the GCode from a STL file, it works pretty well for me. I use LinuxCNC on the CNC table. It took some work to get it configured for a linear 4th axis but I finally got it. I can help with it now if you should need it. The 4th axis by default is angular for a rotary table.
Here's a link to the complete 3D printer plans. I just used the extruder and hot end components.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Combination-CNC-Machine-and-3D-Printer/
 

DMS

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#4
Just looked at the video. Are you printing nylon? It will be a while before I get to mine in any case, as I have a couple other projects in the queue. Good to see it's possible though ;)
 

Gadget

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#5
Just looked at the video. Are you printing nylon? It will be a while before I get to mine in any case, as I have a couple other projects in the queue. Good to see it's possible though ;)
Yes that's .105 nylon string trimmer line. The 2BEIGH3 extruder and hot end is designed to use nylon. It will also use the other plastics as well. Nylon makes a tough part and depending on the density it can be either flexible or hard when done. Nylon printed gears and friction surfaces also don't need lubrication. That's a big plus. I'm running about 263C for the temp on the extruder for nylon.
 

Gadget

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#6
I printed another part today. This was just to see if I could print it, it's an endless knot. It actually printed pretty good. I'm using a low res tip right now but it still looks pretty good. It isn't any good for anything other than conversation but it was fun to watch it print. Satisfying too.

GEDC0167.JPG

GEDC0167.JPG View attachment 95374
 

jumps4

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#7
that seems to be working pretty well gadget
steve
 

Gadget

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#8
3D Printer update

I printed this today. It's a 48 tooth XL belt pulley. I'm going to switch my CNC table to belt drive. Material is nylon.

GEDC0037.JPG GEDC0038.JPG
 

Gadget

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#10
Excelent! I have been contemplating a similar project recently. What software are you using to generate the gcode?
Since my last reply I've found OpenScad. There are a lot of OpenScad files for creating your own gears and timing pulleys. Just change the variables to what you want and it generates the part. from there you can export as an STL file and use Slic3r to create the GCode. There's even a plug in for the free version of Google Sketchup that will create gears and export as STL.
 

ScubaSteve

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#11
Very nice....you could probably use that as a pattern and cast the pulley. How durable is the nylon?

What kind of machine are you using? I like the idea of a multipurpose tool that can do plasma, routing, milling etc. since space is at a premium in the home shop.
 

Gadget

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#12
Very nice....you could probably use that as a pattern and cast the pulley. How durable is the nylon?

What kind of machine are you using? I like the idea of a multipurpose tool that can do plasma, routing, milling etc. since space is at a premium in the home shop.
The nylon should be durable enough to work as is. The square hole in the smaller part is for a nut and the side hole for the screw so is should tighten and hold fine.
My machine is a home built CNC based on plans from www.solsylva.com.
 

dickr

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#13
Hello Gadget.
I'm certainly impressed and feeling like a antique. I have read about 3d printing but thought it was for big money companies. You've certainly disproved that. I imagine you have a wide range of materials you can use depending on the application.
When I sold my shop (very small) I had 3 dimen cnc and only dreamed of 4 and 5. Things have certainly moved along.
Don't mean to be snoopy but what is your background? Do you do similar work at your place of employment. Just curious cause sometimes I speak to a young person and like to encourage them to pursue the machine line but need to get the correct schooling to follow up on it. It seems to be a lot more than standing in front of a machine now to learn the how and whys of it. Electronics have definitely taken over the machine trade in the manufacturing part.
Reading the replies you are not alone in this field. AMAZING!
dickr
 

Gadget

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#14
Hello Gadget.
Don't mean to be snoopy but what is your background? Do you do similar work at your place of employment. Just curious cause sometimes I speak to a young person and like to encourage them to pursue the machine line but need to get the correct schooling to follow up on it. It seems to be a lot more than standing in front of a machine now to learn the how and whys of it. Electronics have definitely taken over the machine trade in the manufacturing part.
Reading the replies you are not alone in this field. AMAZING!
dickr
Hi Dickr,
I spent 27 years in the printing industry before changing career paths. I took some classes and got certified and spent the last 10 years of employment as a network engineer with a local network solutions provider. I've been retired since early 2010 and have enjoyed playing in my home machine shop since then. I do, however, spend a great deal of time training for marathons
and smaller races. I have to divide my time between the two.
Dan
 
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