[4]

9A project completed

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#1
Some of you guys may remember this little crudball I acquired back in April...
DSC02504.JPG
DSC02505.JPG

I had just completed the last project, the Seneca Falls #30 resto-mod,(project of the month) when this lathe found it's way to me via a friend of a friend. My friend, who is also a tool salesman, showed me a pic of this on his phone, which came from his friend, the seller, who now is a retired tool room supervisor. He had this in his back building just taking up space and wanted the room for some of his restoration projects.
I told him I would take it, and explained to him what my mission was. With the lack of training facilities and instructors to teach skilled trades these days, my mission is to educate a passionate individual some skills that seems to be disappearing more every day, if I have to do it one student at a time!
I already had a student lined up to not only learn, but to eventually purchase this lathe once we got it up to date. He thought this was a noble plan, and let me have this machine for a very obscene low price.
He also done the research and got the pick card from South Bend. This model was made in 1945. It left South Bend in March of '45 and went to Reynolds Machinery in Cleveland. In April, it went to Neil Machine of Lima, Oh. Neil Machine was a defense contractor that had a Navy contract to build tow targets for aerial gunners to practice on.
DSC02509.JPG

I don't know how long it stayed there, but it changed hands a few times and it was at a local school for awhile, until he purchased it.

Although quite filthy, everything seemed to be there with no missing parts on the lathe itself. But it didn't have much tooling. It has a 6" Union 3 jaw chuck, but with only the large diameter outside jaws. The chuck is actually pretty tight with little wear, but the killer is it only has the one set of jaws. Other than that, it came with a #2 morse dead center and an Armstrong lantern tool post, with one holder and 3 pieces of hss tool bits....almost bare essentials.

When I acquired this, I thought it would make another winter project, but I was wrong.....since this butted right up to the completion of the Seneca Falls project, I couldn't stop.....like Lays potato chips, can't eat just one! So I started in right away. more to come.
 

RockingJ

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Jun 7, 2018
Messages
15
Likes
4
#2
Nice project! I like your plan of training a person to run it properly!

I think a good manual machinist will be in high demand, the kids coming out of high school only want to learn CNC, if it doesn’t have a computer, they aren’t interested. There will always be a need for manual machinists.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#3
The first thing I tackled was the drive train. The motor on it was not an original, (big surprise) as most of the 70 yr old lathes are that have survived. Typically the motors have been replaced on these older machines which is not a big deal, but what is a big deal is when the original motor pulleys are not re-used. There could be several reasons, mostly because the newer motors have a larger shaft size, or the motor frame is slightly different. If it's a single pulley, it's not a big deal, but if it's a double pulley for a 12 or 16 speed, the original pulley is crucial to mate up to the countershaft pulleys. Unlike the cone pulleys on the spindle and countershaft that use a belt tensioner, the belt that connects the motor to the countershaft relies on the motor placement for tension. Once the motor has been adjusted for the proper tension it is tightened down and forgot about till the belt wears. To change speeds from high range to low range, this is where the FLAT pulleys on the countershaft come in. You simply roll the belt off the flat pulley, and roll it back on the other flat pulley....something you can't do with all V pulleys. And for that fact, the motor pulleys must be of compatible size to use the same length belt on both ranges.
DSC02506.JPG
As you can see, this had a single 2" pulley on the motor, which is not original nor close to being correct size even for a single speed. This model calls for a 2-3/32" and 3-13/32" sheeve size. Of coarse the factory pulleys are machined to those specific sizes, not something you'd find on the shelf at the hardware store. After running the numbers through several online belt length calculators, and rummaging through my stash of pulleys, I came up with a combination that worked with a little tweaking. I ended up with a 3" for the big end, and a 1-3/4" that I re-grooved for the small end and it works perfect.
DSC02515.JPG
I ought to mention that I also changed the motor, as the one that was on it was not reversible. I had a slight problem with the connector box interfering with the belt, so I fabbed up a lower profile version to clear. The mounting frame was also slightly off center from the old one , so I had to re-drill the mounting holes in the motor mount.
DSC02521.JPG
Once that was done, I focused on rebuilding the drum switch. The face had so much wear from switching on and off, that not only was the graphic gone, but the the cover plate was .010" thinner in the wear spots. The contactors had some wear, but not enough to justify a full replacement, so I dressed them off clean and checked with an ohmmeter. There was no saving the faceplate, so I made a new one.
DSC02519.JPG
Now that I actually have a 16 speeds in forward and reverse, looks like the rest is dirty work.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#4
This machine came on a very nice stand that at first I thought was commercial made, but upon closer inspection turned out to be a custom built affair just for this machine. Who ever built it did a bang up job with rolled radius corners and top notch welding. The material is 1/8" thick, and makes the weight about 180 lbs including the drawer. I needed to put this on casters so I could roll it out of the way when I needed more room. I didn't want to raise it much, so I used some 3/8" thick angle iron, inverted to cover the casters and raise it only
about 3/4".
DSC02522.JPG
I added 1/2-13" leveling screws to stabilize the base when it got to where it belonged.
DSC02523.JPG

Now that this is kinda mobile, I can work on it at my leisure without hindering other work.
I tried to contain my excitement by promising myself this would not take over all my spare time, so I was relegated to just "dabbling" with one component or sub-assembly at a time. This made sure I didn't have 4000 parts scattered about, and kept my focus on the component at hand.

I left off with the drum switch, so I figured I would continue with everything that connected to it. The mounting base for the switch and the backgear cover. The mounting base for the switch was slightly cocked where it was screwed to the gear cover, leaving the switch out of level. After I got the first layer of crud removed, I did some grinding with a die grinder to re-contour the casting for a better fit. The gear cover was the same way....just raw casted parts connected to other raw castings that sometimes do not fit the way they were intended. I wanted a solid fit on both pieces because the switch is mounted to it and it would get a lot of use. So I spent some time fitting castings to each other, getting the most surface contact while maintaining the clearance and position. I could have cheated by using fillers such as JB weld to get a glove fit, but my intention was to powder coat the parts, which means it has to withstand 400 degrees of heat to cure. Fillers such as JB will just fall off. If I had planned to paint it, this thing would be full of filler to smooth things out. Powder coat has many advantages, but the disadvantage is there is more prep work on castings to get a smooth finish.
DSC02541.JPG
As it came off the machine
DSC02542.JPG
After a rough clean up
DSC02543.JPG
After the final fitment and polishing
DSC02544.JPG
Finally powder coated.
Sure, it's a little more work, but a smooth slick surface is lots easier to keep clean, with the benefits of the durability of powder coating over paint.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#5
I kept going, getting all of the smaller stuff coated and out of the way. When I got to the saddle, I noticed the crossfeed had lots of slop in the screw and nut. I knew this had to be replaced, but the crossfeed screw is 7/16" -10 LH Acme. This is not a common size by today's standard, so I thought I might try to make one. I wanted to start with the nut first, because I figured it would be the hardest part to make. The hardest part was grinding the threading tool. Once I ground up an internal threading tool, the nut was simple. The screw.....not so much. After 2 attempts, I gave up....there has to be an easier way. Well, there is. I found some 1/2"-10 LH Acme screw stock at McMaster-Carr. 3 ft for $15.00! There was plenty of room to use 1/2" over the 7/16", and the tool I ground up will still work to make the nut. I made a new nut from red brass, and simply cut the screw from the shaft, then drilled and reamed the geared shaft and inserted the new screw and pinned it.
DSC02537.JPG
DSC02538.JPG
DSC02618.JPG
 

Z2V

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
647
Likes
607
#6
Derf, nice work
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#7
I knew sooner or later I would have to dive into the gearbox and gear train as this was quite noisy when I first fired it up. The gear train leading up to the gearbox was in better shape than I expected, with the usual lion share of the wear being on the feed reversing gears, most of it on the forward gear, because it gets used 90% of the time, and it's always turning. The biggest wear was inside the bore of the gears and the axle it rotates on, mostly the axle. The easiest way to overcome that, is to bore the gears out straight, and make new axles to fit. Then the reverse gear was swapped with the forward gear, as it has less tooth wear.
The stud gear and idler gear were both in great shape, with the wear being on the shafts and bushings. I made a new shaft for the stud gear and an oversize bushing for the idler.
Now to the gearbox.....same deal, all of the wear is on the shafts and the housing they rotate in. Where the gears rode on the shafts had minimal wear. But where the shafts rode in the housing, there's about .015-.020" slop. I wasn't crazy about building completely new shafts, then I realized I didn't have to. The shafts are assembled into the housing from the right side. This means I only have to bush the left side of the casting, the right side can be bored out to accept a pressed on sleeve on the shaft. The shafts are nominal .750" in dia. the full length. I turned the left end to .625" for the length of the wear to clean it up, and it fits into a bronze bushing installed into the housing. On the right end, it was turned to .700" for the length of the wear, then an oversize sleeve was heat shrink fitted. Once the housing was bored out for a full clean up, the sleeve was turned to fit at about .785".
DSC02617.JPG
My gawd did that make a difference in noise! It almost sounds like a new machine! Once in a while in the right gears, I hear a slight ringing coming from the large idler gear, probably end play, but I think a nylon washer will cure that.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#8
The gears now run quieter, until I closed the cover. The guard has been sagging over time and now drags on the spindle gear.

The hinge pin was wobbly, and after inspection it was not any wear on the pin where it goes into the hinge bracket. The wobbliness is because it is not solid in the cover itself. If you look at the pin joint you might notice a large area that looks different that the casting. That's because it is. It's a pour of zinc or tin to secure the pin in the casting.



I fired up my torch and melted out the mixture, and this is what the pin looks like.



To re-cast this joint, I first cleaned up the bracket and turned it true to the pin hole.



I wanted the joint to be as square and tight as I could get it so the pour would not leak out.



I then ground on the gear cover itself to get it square and fitting the bracket with minimal leakage. To position the cover, I made a tapered sleeve from a piece of pipe to center the gear cover hole to the spindle. Once I got everything in place, I clamped close to the joint.



When I melted out the pour, I saved it in a soup can, and I'm glad I did. At first glance I thought it was just lead, but after I broke some pieces off, I knew it was a lot harder than lead and did not bend at all. I suspect it is tin or zinc. I remelted with a torch and added a smidget of wheel weight to make up for the small amount that melted and missed the can the first time.



Now it swings like a new one and doesn't drag on anything. Now I'll dress the top off and nobody will ever know......
Up to this point, everything I have done is repair or maintainance and I haven't really done any "mods" yet. One thing that I noticed while working on the gear train, was the square head bolt that secures the feed reversing lever. This is slightly annoying to have to open the cover and use a wrench to change feed direction. I know that some of the 9's came with a pull knob type lever, and some with a pinch type lever like found on the 10K's.
DSC02585.JPG That particular wrench didn't come with the machine, nor did I want to buy one, so I came up with a better plan.
DSC02603.JPG
I replaced the square headed bolt with a SHCS, and made an "L" shaped extension that fit over the head and secured with a set screw. I turned a handle from stainless that threaded into the extension. Once the bolt tension and lever position was finalized, it is a simple as pinching the 2 levers together to loosen, then shift and push the lock lever back down.
DSC02604.JPG Since I always get confused, especially with the crossfeed direction, I made a simple brass tag for clarity. Between the lock handle and the tag, I believe it's elegant enough it looks like it always belonged there.
 

silverhawk

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
174
Likes
235
#9
Wow! This is beautiful! I remember reading the posts back in May about the gear cover, and thinking I might need to do that. And the use of inverted angle iron for the casters makes me want to get busy on my next lathe stand.
 

wildcatfan

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
19
Likes
3
#10
Very nice work. Wish i had a teacher showing me these tricks and techniques while i continue rework of my Hendey
 

Skowinski

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
89
Likes
58
#11
Very nice, thanks for the writeup so far. :encourage:

I'm watching with interest as I'm in the process of tearing down a 9a cabinet model I picked up last month. Was going to clean and repaint the cabinet, put the lathe back on it, and use it for awhile. But, as is typical in my garage it's gotten out of hand and now the lathe is in 1000 pieces, with stripping and repainting starting. :grin big:
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#12
While I was assembling the tailstock, I noticed that it didn't have a graduated dial. Most lathes of that era didn't either, so I didn't think much of it. My heavy 10" has a graduated dial, but my 13" doesn't. After scouring manuals and old catalogs, I learned that the only model that came with a graduated dial on the tailstock was the 10" models. Not that it is a necessity, because the quill itself has a 1/16" scale on it, but it's nice to have definition between the lines, especially when chambering rifle barrels.
After a harder look, I figured out why there was no dial......the hand wheel is cross pinned to the quill screw with a tapered pin. There is no room to get a collar on it and get the pin in the hand wheel. The only way to make more room is to lengthen the quill screw shank to have room for a dial. That idea sounded like much more work I didn't want to do, modify the screw AND make a dial.....(I was only committed to a dial) so I had to think outside the box, so to say and came up with a better plan.
DSC02607.JPG
It was simple.................. DSC02608.JPG
I just split the collar. DSC02601.JPG
I had to turn some clearance on the retaining nut, and the collar rides on the hand wheel journal. I filed a line on the top of the nut for reference.
DSC02602.JPG
I shot that oiling hole full of grease and installed the dial, it will probably never need lubed again.
Making the dial was not hard, I used some 6061 alum. turning it oversize, then splitting with the bandsaw. I milled the mating surfaces flat, then drilled and tapped and screwed them back together. Back to the lathe to turn to final diameter and bore the through hole.
I used a spindex with a 100 hole index plate I made to index the line cuts, and the numbers were engraved with my New Hermes engraver.
The 2 halves mate together so good you can't tell where they split.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#13
While I had the spindle out, I thought it would be nice to have a spider to attach to the outboard end. I wanted it small enough that it would clear the gear cover hole, so it could be used with the cover closed. I figured the best way was to thread the spindle.
DSC02620.JPG

I cut the threads 1-1/16"-20, mainly because I had a tap that size to use on the spider.
DSC02623.JPG
The threads didn't come out pretty as I wanted, but they are plenty good enough for the task. That end of the spindle has a gradual heat treat and it gets harder the closer you get to the gear.

The last major task I got into was the apron. After bath in kerosene got all the caked on crud off, I disassembled and cleaned some more. One of the most noticeable areas of wear is the slop in the carriage wheel, so I made a bushing to go into the apron casting. The shaft itself had little wear, but because of the integral gear and the handwheel is pinned to it, It didn't warrant a sleeve. Now it's not quite as tight as a new one, but quite tolerable.

Now this next step is quite a leap....and I don't know if anyone else has ever done this.
One of my pet peeves, or maybe I should say "preferences" is that I find star clutch knobs a bit out dated and cumbersome. When I got my first lathe, it was a heavy 10" with a toggle cam clutch lever. My second lathe was a 13", with a star knob clutch, that I found that was a p.i.t.a. after being accustomed to the lever on the 10". After I studied how the toggle cam clutch worked on the 10", I made a conversion for the 13".
The toggle cam clutch was available as an upgrade, available for all the SB lathes, sizes 10" and up. It was NEVER available for the 9's.

The conversion I did for the 13" is an exterior conversion. I say that because I never removed the apron to do it.
DSC02624.JPG
This consists of 2 bearings, the rear bearing is what the cam pushes against, and the smaller bearing which the yoke pulls against. The angle iron bracket keeps the whole affair from rotating. This was relatively easy on a machine of this size because the apron is larger.

This is the toggle cam lever on the heavy 10". All of the bearings are internal.
lever.jpg

The toggle cam clutch itself is different from a star knob clutch, as it has a stack of clutch discs that applies friction to the face of the worm wheel, as opposed to the inside periphery of the star knob type.
scan0001.jpg

The star knob clutch uses 2 half moon wedges that expand the clutch shoes against the inside of the worm wheel when the knob is tightened.

DSC02556.JPG

This locks the worm wheel with the clutch sleeve that is connected to the gear train. Once engaged, the whole assembly rotates as one.
The toggle cam clutch has thrust bearings on both ends, enabling the worm wheel and clutch sleeve to engage without rotating the lever. However, there is a key that retains the position of the lever assembly from rotating from static drag.

Now that is probably clear as mud, but it's easy to understand if you have the actual assemblies to study. My mission now is to figure out how to cram some bearings into the mix and make it work.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#14
The original clutch was not gonna work because there was no room to get a bearing on the end and have clearance for the oil trough cover. That's where I had to do some "re-injuneerin".
The bearing I used is about 3/8" thick, so I had to make up for that amount in the thickness in the clutch. The original clutch shoes were replaced with a "coned" set I made from 12L14. Then the "expander cone" was made to contain the bearing and end up flush with the end of the worm wheel.
DSC02573.JPG
DSC02574.JPG
DSC02575.JPG
DSC02576.JPG
DSC02577.JPG
DSC02578.JPG
DSC02579.JPG

Of course I had to make a new drawbar,a swivel nut, binder cam and the retainer bushing.
The drawbar has a screwdriver slot cut in the end for adjustment once the swivel nut is on.
There is a grub screw in the swivel nut to lock it in place. The swivel nut has a pin that protrudes out the back that engages in a hole in the retainer bushing. That keeps the drawbar from rotating. To keep the retainer bushing from rotating, there is a clamp on the bottom of the apron.
Normally on the factory version, the retainer bushing is inside the apron. The bushing has a key that mates with a keyway on the drawbar, and then the bushing is secured into the apron with a grub screw. There was not any room for a retainer bushing in the apron, so I had to place the bushing outside the apron. To make this work, the apron casting had to be modified for concentricity.
DSC02560.JPG
After the boss was milled to be square and concentric to the rest of the world, a pocket was milled for the retainer bushing clamp.
DSC02568.JPG

A hole was drilled and tapped for 10-32 clamp & screw.
DSC02571.JPG

The retainer bushing houses the outboard bearing.
DSC02580.JPG
DSC02581.JPG
DSC02582.JPG
DSC02583.JPG
DSC02584.JPG

Once assembled, the clutch was adjusted in the ball park, then fine tuned by turning the worm wheel with the retaining bushing clamp left loose. When it's good, just tighten the clamp. If further adjust is needed after the apron is installed, the grub screw on the swivel nut is loosened, and the drawbar can be adjusted with a screwdriver, but you must remove the pivot pin for access. Kinda trial and error, but doable. The angle of the lever can also be adjusted by the clamp on the bottom.

WHEWWW! That was a lot! but worth it......it works good as a factory version!
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#15
After I celebrated the triumph with the clutch lever, the only thing left was to paint the bed. Everything I could fit into my shop oven got powder coated, the bed and base had to be painted. I made a powder coat color sample, and took it to the local Ace Hardware for a match. After some mis-communication, I finally got the paint. I only requested a quart, for some reason they made a gallon. For the screw up, they let me have the gallon for $11.00.
Anyway, I used some gloss hardener and japan drier in this oil based enamel, and it dries in about 1 hour.
I pulled the sub bases from bed for easier handling and I noticed that bottoms of the bases were raw casting......not machined. I figured it would be beneficial that they were flat and the same height, so I gave them a clean up cut with a face mill.
DSC02595.JPG

Before final assembly, I focused on improving the base cabinet by re-vamping the drawer(s)
Originally it had one big drawer in the center that slid (and not very good) just on angle iron and flat tracks. I removed the angle iron and mounted the drawer on roller slides to the left side of the cabinet. This left room for 2 more drawers stacked on the right side. Below the drawers, I added doors to the bottom and a 12" high shelf inside. DSC02609.JPG
The hardware for the doors and the big drawer actually came from an old SS barbecue grill
that I shoulda scrapped long ago.
DSC02610.JPG
I added the shelf and backsplash for a place to store tools and way to mount the work light.
DSC02606.JPG
One of the last things I done....I spindle speed chart made from brass.
DSC02614.JPG
DSC02611.JPG
DSC02605.JPG
This was another fun project, that I thoroughly enjoyed and learned from, thanks for watching.
My "student" and new owner, now has about 8 hrs on this machine. I told him before he could haul it off, he had to show me some skill, so class was in session. In 4 hrs, I had him threading like a pro. A little slow, but precise. Patience is a plus...
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
1,049
Likes
1,594
#16
That's one beautiful looking machine now, I'll say. Very nice.

-frank
 

bss1

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
197
Likes
267
#17
Wow great job. My first lathe was an SB 9” with V pulleys like that. This is one of the best restorations I have seen. Congrats to the new owner!
 

craptain

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Sep 21, 2017
Messages
47
Likes
18
#18
What a beautiful looking lathe. The clutch conversion is a work of art. I would never have dreamed of doing it. And the cabinet conversion makes far more efficient use of the space.
Thanks for the write up.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

Skowinski

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
89
Likes
58
#19
Repeating others, but amazing work. I wish I had half the skills and abilities you obviously do!

The war production board tag - how did you clean that up? I have a couple of old SB tags on my cabinet that I'd like to save, one just a little crusty and old looking, and another that someone painted partially over when they did a hurried job.
 

derf

Brass
Registered
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
630
Likes
732
#20
The biggest obstacle to overcome when restoring badges is getting them flat, second to getting them off in one piece without much damage. Once I got the war badge off, I soaked it in lacquer thinner and scrubbed with a tooth brush to strip all the paint and crud off. Once it was down to bare metal, I rolled it with a chunk of 1-1/2 round stock on my surface plate. Roll in several directions to make sure all the high and low spots become invisible.
You can use paint, or powder coat to re-color the background. Make sure the paint is applied evenly and not too thick. Once fully cured, wet sand on a flat surface like a sheet of glass or surface plate. Pay attention to when the lettering starts to appear, making sure that the colored background doesn't start to sand off where you don't want it to. If this happens,
stop sanding and then use an exacto knife to scape off the paint from the lettering. This can get tedious, and you might have to use a magnifier, but depending how bad the tag is, it is the most effective way to get clean crisp letters. After the lettering is satisfactory, give it a coat of clear finish.

I didn't put that much effort into the gearbox chart, because it was still very legible and showed little wear. I scrubbed the dirt off and left the original patina or "stank" then clear coated it.
DSC02507.JPG
In the condition I got it, you can see that the chart doesn't fit very well on the gearbox casting with a lot of gaps. Typically a fit this bad usually results in several dents and dings around the edges that are unsupported. When I removed the chart, I found there was a big hump in the gearbox casting under the center of the chart, causing this not to wrap very good. I ground out the hump on the casting and then rolled and finessed the chart to fit with a slight dish in the center, making all the edges tight to the casting. I did have to move the original holes slightly to mate to the casting on account of the slight stretch. You can see part of it in this pic.
DSC02614.JPG
 

bss1

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
197
Likes
267
#21
This may sound strange but I had good luck polishing similar badges on my south bend, Burke Millrite, and DoAll bandsaw using Flitz metal polish. The original paint was still on them, just oxidized and dirty. You may want to try it on something less obvious at first.
 

Tim9

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
180
Likes
110
#22
Very nice looking lathe.
 

savarin

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
1,915
Likes
2,894
#23
a beautiful restoration, thanks for showing it.
 

Janderso

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
884
Likes
549
#24
Beautiful,
Thank you for the inspiration and ideas doesn't do it justice. That is incredible work my friend.
You have plenty of talent, you can take that to the bank!
Thank you for the ideas and inspiration.
 

thenrie

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
304
Likes
40
#25
Well, this surely ain't your grandpa's old lathe! Nice work. Very nice. And some ingenious ideas for upgrades, as well.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top