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A Peerless Shaper Followed Me Home Too

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f350ca

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#1
Rather than continue stealing Frank's thread (thank you by the way) I've started one on the clean up of this one.
Not much if any info on the net about this brand. Was built in Guelph Ontario no idea when. The 5 grove V-belt pulley is original, (the clutch is inside it) so Im guessing after the 40"s?
Some of these photos are in Frank's thread but thought I'd repost for completeness.

It hadn't been used in about 10 years, and sat in a damp building so it has surface rust and years of aged grime.
IMG_1855.jpg

IMG_1856.jpg

I wet it down with Spray 9 household cleaner then pressure washed it before bringing it into the shop.
Used my car hoist with a pipe across the arms to lift it, then pulled the trailer out from under neath.

IMG_1859.jpg

There was no way to power it up at the place I bought it so took a bit of a gamble. I could roll it over with the pulley but it was some stiff.
It had a 50 amp 220 v single phase welder plug on the cord but the motor doesn't have capacitors.

IMG_1867.jpg

The motor rewind guy said it could be a repulsive/inductive motor, if it was he said to do all I could to keep it going, they had incredible starting torque . Sure enough I found a cover and there were brushes for the start windings. They pull back off the commentator once its at speed.

IMG_1866.jpg

With a little caution I plugged it in, no sparks or dimming lights. Flipped the switch and it gave a bit of a hiss coming up to speed then almost silent, save the slapping of the laminations coming off the ancient belt.
Eased the clutch in and she sprang back to life. A little morning and groaning as the new oil worked into the bearings and covered the gears then started to get quieter. Still has a little gear howl in the higher gears but guess thats expected with square cut gears.
Seams like the gamble payed off so its time to start cleaning the old girl up.

Had a cold wet day here and she started to fall apart.

IMG_1871.jpg

Thank god for overhead cranes when you start disassembling parts this heavy.
 

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T Bredehoft

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#2
There are at least a few of us with fond memories of shapers, (first machine I ran in my apprenticeship). Its good that you got it running, its' better that you're re-habbing it. Keep it up.

Tom
 

hvontres

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#3
Nice find... I am glad your gamble payed off. One thing that looks weird to me is that the motor pulley only seems to have two grooves when the big one has 5...
 

mattthemuppet2

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#4
crumbs Dangermouse, that's not a trivial machine! Fingers crossed it just needs a bit of TLC and it'll be as good as new.
 
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f350ca

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#5
Thanks for the comments.
I'm seeing next to no wear in the slides for the table and the ends of the ram look great, hard to believe that a commercial machine would have seen this little use?
As for the motor I doubt its the original but can't imagine what it would have had that would warrant 5 A section belts. My lathe uses 4 belts with a 10 hp motor.

Greg
 
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f350ca

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#6
All the front end parts got degreased and pressure washed then into a barrel of molasses for a couple of weeks soaking.

IMG_1876.jpg

From what it took to fill the barrel, there's roughly 13 gallons of cast iron, or 1000 pounds, sounds about right.

Greg
 

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Silverbullet

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#7
Lack of wear could mean it was well taken care of . The old machinist learned to take care of ther machinery while serving there apprenticeship . I don't even know if anyone does that anymore . I think our nation is going to crumble if we don't start taking a stand to stop it . Sorry pet peeve . Now let's get this baby cleaned up. Fix what needs doin and show it off. Hey the old drill vise on the floor lets get it up and cleaned too.
 
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f350ca

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#8
Could be well taken care of but I found a DND number stamped into the adjustable gib on the ram. Department of National Defence I would expect only used it for maintenance and probably very little of that. The last owner only used it to cut keyways, evident from the paint on either side to the table support. Doesn't look like the table ever moved.
The drill press vice gets used often, No rust just not painted. Its actually back on the press, was using it today.

Greg
 

francist

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#9
Would the original colour be a real dark grey then, Greg? If you're thinking of matching it, Para "Meltdown" should be a pretty close facsimile.

-frank
 
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f350ca

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#10
Can't tell what the original colour was. Started stripping it, there's a lighter blue under the top coat and in the odd place a bit of lime green. They used some sort of filler to smooth the castings, dark grey graphite looking material. Thick and chipped in places.
Have some lighter grey automotive enamel left over from painting the lathe. May use that if it looks like there is enough.

Greg
 
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f350ca

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#11
Got some time in on the shaper today.
The handle that locks the ram to the yoke was broken.
IMG_1901.jpg

Being short I suspect it was ran loose and damaged the threads in the yoke. They don't look too bad but the stud was really loose when threaded in.
Had to remove the ram to get at it.
IMG_1899.jpg

The damaged threads.

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Bored the hole out and threaded it 1 inch UNC

IMG_1898.jpg

Then made a plug on the lathe and left the threads about 6 thou under what my cheat sheet said. With a coat of red Locktite the plug went in with a pipe wrench, I hope never to come out again.
With the plug cut flush I drilled and threaded it back to the original 3/4 UNC.

IMG_1900.jpg

One part repaired, many more to go.

Greg
 

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#12
Nice job on the repair. Mike
 
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f350ca

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#13
Spent two days removing some graphite based filler they'd used on the castings. Was badly chipped so it had to come off. 24 grit disks on the 7 inch sander removed it but spread it all over the shop, everything you touch is now black.
Sprayed it today with automotive urethane I had left over from my lathe.

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Now I need to remember where all the parts go.

Greg
 

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f350ca

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#14
The graduations on the swivel behind the clapper box got pretty faint after the molasses bath. Mounted it on the indexing head and recut them with an engraver I ground out of a broken 1/4 inch carbide drill. Restamped the numbers as well.
IMG_1922.jpg

Assembly continues. Thank god for the overhead crane, not many of the parts are liftable with my old back.


IMG_1926.jpg

IMG_1927.jpg
 

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cjtoombs

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#15
My guess on date of manufacture would be closer to mid 20s than 40s. For the most part, by the 40s the motor drives had a very integrated look to them. I have a G&E vintage 1924 with a similar look to the drive, although a much heavier machine. Much earlier than this and they came with flat belt drives, the late teens early 20s were the transition years. Another tell on age is weight versus capacity, as this went up as the years went by. My oldest shaper is either a 12" Whipp or 16" Steptoe, both of which were flat belt machines, the Steptoe is pre-1906 (they changed castings sometime around there) and the Whipp is of similar vintage, and they are both much lighter built than the 1924 G&E 16". Nice find, by the way, I am envious of that universal (semi universal?) table on yours. I have been looking for a shaper in the 16-24" range with a universal table for some time, they seem to come up either very far away, for ridiculous prices or both.
 
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f350ca

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#16
Thanks for the info, didn't think v belts were used that early.
 
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f350ca

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#17
The dial on the down feed is hopelessly small. Similar to the one on my Logan, not a hope of reading it when the machine is running.
IMG_1929.jpg

Im going to make a new one about 3 inch in dia. Can anyone come up with a reason not to make it from aluminum? Would be much easier to engrave the graduations.

Greg
 

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pineyfolks

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#18
How about making the dial with an angled top that's engraved? That might give you a better view yet.
 

cjtoombs

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#19
Thanks for the info, didn't think v belts were used that early.
Apparently the continuous rubber V belt was invented in 1917 by John Gates (leather ones were in use at least a short while before that). I think that may be why there were so many belts used, as perhaps they weren't quite as reliable as they are nowadays (or buyer perception meant that they wouldn't sell without multiple belts). My 1926 G&E has three belts, and uses a 3hp, 1750 RPM motor, my 2012 7.5 Hp 1750 RPM air compressor has one. Also, the patent was filed for multi-V belt drive in 1925 and granted in 1928, although they must have been marketing it prior to that as my G&E uses it, and I believe that earlier G&E shapers of the same design as mine used the same drive.

Those old shapers all had ridiculously small (or no) graduated dials. Maybe they made the young apprentices with good eyes run those things, because they sure give me trouble.
 
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f350ca

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#20
Thanks for the info. You could well be right on the perception thing, they maybe went 5 wide to have it look the width of the flat belt it would need. Certainly can't see needing the power 5 A section belts would carry.
The dials on the table feed are a little larger, unfortunately where they're mounted I can't go much if any bigger, but this down feed one is hopeless as is, but I'll give them credit, they did get all 125 divisions on there.
Whether we get a date on this or not, reverse engineering it is certainly interesting.
Thanks
Greg
 

tertiaryjim

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#21
Belt length varies greatly even now. One had to get matched sets which were measured by the manufacture or supplier and still weren't great.
The gang sets available now, which are connected by the same backing, are great.
Because belt length varied so much people tended to over-tighten them so each belt had tension.
This caused bushings and bearings to fail.
If you use two or more belts, it's worth the extra bucks to get those with the single backing.
Tension is even and wear is reduced on the belts and sheaves.
 

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#22
More than likely the 5 belt sheave was close to the right size and laying around. I know how that works ! The width of the flat belt pulley might also have something to do with the use of the wide sheave. As in filling up the shaft length . If it's a DND stamped , it could be from the war. The war turned Canada from an agricultural country to an industrial one.
 
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f350ca

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#23
Though probably not ideal I've had pretty good luck with matching belts if they came from the same lot. For now Im going to try a pair of link belt V belts, found a bunch of unused A section material at the dump. Getting proper belts and things like that around here isn't easy. Not much for industrial suppliers.
The casting that supports the end of the pulley shaft may well have been from a line shaft era. A narrow 2 or 3 groove belt pulley would have appeared tiny inside it.

Greg
 

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#24
Belts are now called matchmaker or something like that,, meaning you don't have to match the size range. Belts use to be marked with a# as well as a size. Like A-28 #49, the #49 meant it was under length, #50 being right on. This matchmaker seems to work if you stay with in brands. Belts stretch with use.
 
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f350ca

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#25
Decided to go with a steel dial. Will treat it with chemical blueing then polish the body to hopefully end up with dark lines.
The blank made, thats the original dial on top.
IMG_1932.jpg

I need 125 divisions on the dial, its an 8 TPI lead screw. Worked out that I needed a 25 division plate or attempt compound indexing as described in the machinist handbook. Decided it would be much easier to make a 50 hole plate.

IMG_1930.jpg

The dial engraved, now to mess it up with crooked numbers.

IMG_1933.jpg

Greg
 

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bpratl

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#26
Looking good, that's a great restoration job. It's so nice when a project comes close to the end.
 

johnnyc14

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#27
What a great find Greg. In Ontario you guys have access to more of that great old machinery. Out here in the west there was much less industrial work going on in the mid 20th century. Machines like that are scarce around here. Thanks for sharing.

John
 

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#28
Nice job , it really looks great I bet you'll love using it. Just something about the old ways . Machining done by machinist instead of cnc and no hands on labor. Your new dial is gona be the envy of others who have tiny dials and old eyes. Me included, yupp very nice.
Oh you could have used aluminum and then used aluma black. Or black anodized and then scratched your lines , but the old ones are steel so your right .
 

Downwindtracker2

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#29
Heck, I don't even have dials on my shaper. It's a shop built, 7" stroke. The down feed is 3/8"NC and the cross feed is 1/2"NC. I'll change that when I put dials on it.
 
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f350ca

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#30
Its together and in its final spot, now have to make some room around it.

IMG_1945.jpg

The first cut, but not the deepest.

IMG_1944.jpg

Haven't worked it hard yet, a 20 thou cut makes no change in the sound of the machine. The minimum side feed is 15 thou per stroke, wish it would go lower, will be using a shear tool a lot I expect.

Greg
 
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