[4]

Air Compressor Wall Mount

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

ddickey

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
1,777
Likes
899
#1
I have a small 46lbs air compressor that I'd like to mount on the wall. My walls are finished so it would be anchored to the wall stud. I was thinking two lengths of Unistrut and a wall/shelf bracket. Anyone ever try this?
 

DAT510

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Messages
316
Likes
196
#2
I mounted my 40 gal compressor in the wall using Unistrut, though I used Full pieces of strut for the Horizontal arms and Diagonals vs the Shelf bracket shown, as it was 125lbs+. Depending what you to cross the two Shelf Brackets with, I'd think you'd be ok.
 

Nogoingback

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
1,022
Likes
788
#3
Remember that an air compressor vibrates, so whatever mount you use has to be strong enough to stand up to movement as well as the
weight of the machine. One possibility would be to mount your brackets to plywood screwed to the studs. Those brackets also look
light to me: I'd go for something a bit more substantial. If the compressor is oilless, you could probably mount it in just about any orientation
which gives you some options as well.
 
Last edited:

ddickey

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
1,777
Likes
899
#4
Good idea.
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,436
#5
If the wall is connected to any wall within your living space, be prepared for strange noises in the middle of the night.

Ray
 

ddickey

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
1,777
Likes
899
#6
Because it might fall off the wall?
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,436
#7
Because it might fall off the wall?
Mainly because a sharp vibration like that will travel all through the house if it's connected directly to a wall. But yes, it could slide off the shelf if not secured.

Ray
 

Eddyde

Bronze
Registered
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
1,410
Likes
1,196
#8
The bracket and unistrut will hold it just fine but the vibration will be amplified if you mount in on a sheetrock wall. Best place is on a concrete floor.
 

ddickey

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
1,777
Likes
899
#9
My idea is to drill into the studs. I'll anchor some thick plywood or a pair of 2x6 running vertical using Spax screws, I think. Mount a 1'- 1.5' unistrut vertical on the planks or plywood and that shelf bracket pictured above. I'll space them apart to use the existing compressor feet with rubber mounts onto the shelf bracket. Probably over kill but.
The compressor is only used run a mister and blow off chips so it rarely runs and it's incredibly quite.
I hate having it take up precious floor space. Plus now I will route hose to my mill and lathe (on the ceiling) and maybe a hose reel.
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
2,569
Likes
1,886
#10
I mounted my air comp outside in its own little shed, unconnected to my shop, except for electric and pipe lines; doesn't take up shop space and is much less noisy.
 

tq60

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2014
Messages
669
Likes
393
#11
Time to engineer...

Side note first, we mounted our 5 hp RPC to the top of one of the posts of the car lift.

Clean and out of the way until we fire it up and the hollow post became a megaphone and noise level nuts.

Isolator pads on bolts solved it.

Back to task.

The wall will become a speaker as the compressor being soundly attached will translate every movement into the wall.

The movement of compressor also will place stresses on every joint so in addition to maintaining the load of dead weight of compressor the joints need to be vibration resistant.

If bolted use side shear design where the fasteners are perpendicular to the loads so a loose nut will will not fail.

The shelf supports should be a triangle with the top rail having long screw vertical down into the wall rail with the top rail on top.

Bottom support resting against vertical support with screw in from wall side so force is same as tightening screw.

Outside part screw downwards and rail under top rail

Top shelf screws through supports.

Vertical supports can be lugged to studs or to a back board and lugged.

The compressor needs to be bolted down with isolators specific for the weight.

Use set with studs as easier to assemble.

Air hose needs service loop to isolate vibration as does power cord.

Select a wall farthest from living quarters.



Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

extropic

Active User
Registered
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
543
Likes
362
#12
My $.02:
1) Prepare 3ea 2x6s long enough to cover three studs, each with 2 carriage bolts spaced to match compressor mount dimension. The carriage bolt heads to be on the WALL side (threads toward struts). Screw/lag the 2x6s, horizontally to the building framing. One about compressor level. One near bottom of angle brackets. the third near the floor.
2) Use 8ft long struts resting on isolater pads on the floor. This carries the vertical load (and vibration) to the floor, not the wall. Isolating Pads
3) Attach the struts to using the isolators, as linked, and elastic stop nuts. Don't over compress the isolators. Leave them soft enough to absorbe, rather than transmit the vibration. Vibration Damping Mounts
4) Strut system Engineering Data is available on the web so verify the load carrying capacity of the angle bracket you intend to use. Buying the appropriate brackets will be easy.
4) Mount the compressor to the brackets using the linked type isolators, and elastic stop nuts. Choose isolators for the appropriate weight of your compressor. Vibration Isolators
5) Use the unobstructed strut to attach other clever storage solutions.
6) show us pictures when you get 'er done.
 

GoceKU

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
675
Likes
1,308
#13
ddickey, i've done something like this long time ago and had to redo it two times, first time just bolted it to the metal colum ( steel building), and the nose an vibration was horible, so i mounted the compressor on car gearbox mounts, rubber with bolts on both sides and put styrofoam on the sides, this made it good, but couple of weeks letter a welded legs to the brackets that is anchored to the floor and made a shelf from them and this helped alot.
 

pineyfolks

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
1,078
Likes
419
#14
You could make a set of shelves or storage rack and mount it on top so you could use the space underneath.
Hanging it from the ceiling joists might be another option.
 

jdedmon91

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2017
Messages
327
Likes
620
#15
I mounted my air comp outside in its own little shed, unconnected to my shop, except for electric and pipe lines; doesn't take up shop space and is much less noisy.
Mounting outside is the way to go here is what happened to mine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

pineyfolks

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
1,078
Likes
419
#16
They had one explode at the shop I worked at right before I started. 150gal tank went through the roof.
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,254
Likes
5,534
#18
Here's how I did mine, above the small metal storage and shop door. Two 80 gallon, 5 hp.

1527862486623.png
 

GoceKU

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
675
Likes
1,308
#19
I actually was looking at a big 400 liter air tank today at the junkyard, it was at 25$ but there was no plate with year of production and someone welded three big pipes for legs to hold it vertically, i'm not sure is it worth risking it, it looked to be in good shape not much rust and no big dents.
 

Eddyde

Bronze
Registered
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
1,410
Likes
1,196
#20
I actually was looking at a big 400 liter air tank today at the junkyard, it was at 25$ but there was no plate with year of production and someone welded three big pipes for legs to hold it vertically, i'm not sure is it worth risking it, it looked to be in good shape not much rust and no big dents.
Do you have any places near you where you could have it hydro tested?
 

GoceKU

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
675
Likes
1,308
#21
Do you have any places near you where you could have it hydro tested?
Not really, i'm sure there is some company in skopje, next city over but transporting and paying for testing this big of tank will be a big hassle.
 

Eddyde

Bronze
Registered
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
1,410
Likes
1,196
#22
Not really, i'm sure there is some company in skopje, next city over but transporting and paying for testing this big of tank will be a big hassle.
Sometimes they'll come to your location. You can also test it yourself; Fill the tank completely with water, leave no air, then pressurize it to double the working pressure you can use a high pressure air pump or a scuba tank to do this, possibly a pressure washer but you have to be careful not to over pressurize it. If the tank bursts it will just split and the water will gush out, it won't explode as water cannot store energy. Test the tank every few years.
 

GoceKU

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
675
Likes
1,308
#23
Good advice Eddyde, could i use compressed CO2 with a regulator from my welder to test the tank?
 

Eddyde

Bronze
Registered
Joined
Oct 13, 2014
Messages
1,410
Likes
1,196
#24
Good advice Eddyde, could i use compressed CO2 with a regulator from my welder to test the tank?
Not sure about CO2. because it can dissolve into water it might make a lot of seltzer and that can store energy... I would think an inert gas like Argon or Nitrogen would be a safer bet.
 

tq60

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2014
Messages
669
Likes
393
#25
If completely full cap it with a fitting tapped for a grease zerk.

Have high pressure gage in tank and use grease gun full of water to pressurize

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

whitmore

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
345
Likes
198
#26
Not really, i'm sure there is some company in skopje, next city over but transporting and paying for testing this big of tank will be a big hassle.
No need to find 'a company' to do it; just use a hose to fill the tank, then bleed some compressed air (bottled nitrogen?) into
it. If it gets to three times the blowout pressure, it's fine. The main hassle is getting the safety gear
off the tank for the testing. As l ong as the tank contains WATER (which doesn't compress) it can let go at
all the seams at once, without making any more damage than a puddle. Energy stored in compressed air, though,
is bad.

I'm with the 'attach to the floor' crew, cantilevers (like the bracket) fail in sagging-door fashion, 'way too often for
comfort. Vibration will pull nails and loosen screws and bolts, but won't drive vertical legs through the floor.
Strong legs underneath, and a shackle to the unistrut, will keep the table from getting kicked over or taklng a walk.
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
1,037
Likes
422
#27
Testing a tank with compressed air or any gas for that is not only a bad idea, even when the tank is filled with water first, then pressurising it with air. It is actually illegal, or it should be, certainly is where I live. Any gas including air will dissolve in the water, and when the tank lets go you still have the rapid release of stored energy. Small home or shop air compressors almost always suffer from internal rust. Mostly because we, the owners don't drain them often enough. In the humid climate that is so often found in the uS moisture condensation in air tanks is always going to be present. the tanks really need to be set up with a permanent drain. You van buy or even make an automatic drain valve.

For simplicity's sake, as I don't run my compressor very often I have set it up with a small drain valve that is permanently cracked open, just a small but continuous blowdown, and I live in a very dry climate, but I still get some moisture out of it. I'm hoping that will extend the life of my tank, I do intend to set up an automatic drain valve,but not sure when this will happen.
 

homebrewed

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 28, 2017
Messages
177
Likes
87
#28
I mounted my air comp outside in its own little shed, unconnected to my shop, except for electric and pipe lines; doesn't take up shop space and is much less noisy.
The lab I worked in had several pieces of equipment that used rotary vacuum pumps, running 24/7. To keep the noise down we constructed a separate room just for the pumps. It really helped to reduce the noise to an acceptable level.
 

yendor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 11, 2013
Messages
183
Likes
63
#29
I would bet the owner of that exploded compressor tank did not do the required maintenance of draining the water/moisture condensentation that comes from compressing air.

The compresssion process cause the water vapor in the intke air to condense.
If you don't drain your compressor regularly it WILL rust out the bottom until it becomes so thin it ruptures.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top