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Arbors and Hole Saws for Tube Notching?

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f350ca

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1/2 inch shank hole saw arbours are quite common. A 1 1/4 hole saw won't go through the tubing in one pass at an angle (may at 90 deg) you'll have to cut part way, then get rid of the top of the waste tube with a cut off saw or hack saw to finish the cut. It hangs up in the bottom of the saw. Best to tighten the hole saw on the arbour and not use the pins, Unless its tight against the arbour they wobble and cut oversize.

Greg
 

Asm109

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I have used a lathe for tube notching. Hole saw in chuck. Replace tool holder with a block with a hole that holds your tubing at center height.
It should have a slot and pinch bolt to hold the tubing tight.
Use the compound to set the angle you want to cut.
Works a treat it does.
 

machPete99

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If using a hole saw for this do not use an arbor that has the locking pins, or at least do not use the locking pins, as they allow the cutter to wobble around and it will cut oversize. You want an arbor that screws in tight.

Some of the commercial arbors have a relief groove that limits the thread engagement with the cutter. Using a washer here helps to keep it from stripping out.
 

ErichKeane

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In my experience, hole saws do really poorly if they hit the material at an angle. I would expect any time you tilted the head that the side-load would mess up your cut.
 

bob308

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check the racing magazines. there is a tool the is for notching tubing it uses a hole saw can be used in a drill press can set angles. I have one it works well I built many roll cages with it.
 

eugene13

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We build a lot of things out of tubing in our shop; the black one is an IMCA modified, the naked one is a WISSOTA B-mod, we use the "Old Joint Jigger" for 99.9 of our copes, but sometimes we need to use the mill. I built these arbors out of 1" CRS of unknown pedigree, I turned them down to 7/8" to fit my largest collet and not fit the 3/4" drill press. I drill a hole and thread in a stud of the appropriate size. I run them at 40 RPM with .0015 feed regardless of size. A good hole will build two chassis and then some and it will give as good a fits as YOU are capable of making, and the most bang for your buck.
My argument for using hole saws; I 1/2" high quality hole saw, about $15.00. 1 1/2" rotobroach, about $150.00, I haven't used up 10 hole saws since I bought the Joint Jigger back in '96.
the last picture is of the driver's side door bar, it's a compound angle and a difficult as you need to nibble a little off each end to get your width and I do it in the mill.
 

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eugene13

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They do what I need them to do, and I treat them gently. Here's a tip from the Ol Joint Jigger man himself, Dale Welch; When using a new hole saw the first time, dull up the teeth slightly with some emery paper, this will diminish
Yeah, those shouldn't wobble around much!
the chance of it digging in and breaking the saw. Been their done that.
 

erikmannie

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The advice to slightly dull the teeth on a new hole saw came just in time because I received my keyless chuck today from Precision Matthews. With the very last of my money, I picked up two Milwaukee arbors & three 1 1/4” hole saws from the local Home Depot.

Tomorrow I will try these 3/8” shank arbors in my new chuck on my PM-25MV milling machine. I will make a video of the attempt and post a link here.

I remember that at school they used a hole saw for about five miter cuts, and then threw the holesaw away. As I recall, they did not use the center drill.
 

f350ca

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I wouldn't recommend using a hole saw with a keyless chuck. The chucks are only rated to their opening dia, a hole saw will over tighten it to the point you'll need a pipe wrench to open it. Don't ask how I know.

Greg
 

erikmannie

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I wouldn't recommend using a hole saw with a keyless chuck. The chucks are only rated to their opening dia, a hole saw will over tighten it to the point you'll need a pipe wrench to open it. Don't ask how I know.

Greg
The chuck is rated for 1/8”-5/8”. My plan is to use a 3/8” shanked arbor attached to a 1 1/4” hole saw. So that could be a problem?

If I’m understanding correctly, you are saying that using up to a 5/8” drill would be okay, but that the longer lever of a 1 1/4” hole saw would exert too great of a leverage on the tightening mechanism.

Along those same lines, I recently used a cheater bar on my bench vise handle to clamp the part tighter. This broke the cast iron beam in the vise and I had to buy a whole new bench vise.

I wonder how this plays into using a slitting saw (what with the relatively large diameter of the slitting saw). I know the RPMs are greatly reduced. I imagine that people put a slitting saw in a collet.
 
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erikmannie

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So I decided not to risk abusing my new keyless chuck.

I will get a keyed chuck for this job.
 

AlanB

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Seems like something more rigid than a drill chuck is desirable for this. A drill chuck is not designed for the uneven forces of cutting tubing at angles.
 

f350ca

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Good decision. I've often have the vibration and torque of a hole saw loosen the Jacobs taper on the drill chuck as well. For a slitting saw you want as little runout as possible, or one side of the saw does all the cutting. I've only ever used them with a collet.

Greg
 

erikmannie

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I bought a (max) 1/2” keyed chuck from Little Machine Shop.

My options are a limited now because I will be very much out of money for at least 6 months.

I wish I could remember exactly how they chucked up the hole saws at United Bicycle Institute. I am positve that they used the bimetal hole saws for all of the miter cuts. All of the material was 4130 chromoly tubing with .020”-.040” wall thickness. All of this was on a Bridgeport knee type mill, so you know that is rigid enough for any variation of this task.
 

ttabbal

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I think I would make or buy an arbor with a round shank and put that in a collet.
 

nnam

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Using hole saws without two safety pins/lock pins, or whatever it is called can be dangerous because they can spin out of the hoder and you got sawed!
 

Jason280

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I wouldn't recommend using a hole saw with a keyless chuck. The chucks are only rated to their opening dia, a hole saw will over tighten it to the point you'll need a pipe wrench to open it. Don't ask how I know.
I recently learned this myself...;)
 

kb58

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I designed and built two tube frame cars from scratch (www.midlana.com and www.kimini.com) using the typical tube notcher and hole saws. It worked fine, but was messy, the cutters are not intended for use on curves surfaces, and quality control was only "meh." That last bit means that the hole saw usually wobbles or has some offset. As a result, the end product isn't as precise as it could be—but the reality is that it usually doesn't matter due to all the other variables involved. The only real issue is the course pitch of the teeth; if someone started making fine-pitch hole saws, there's probably enough business that it would be viable.
 

erikmannie

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I designed and built two tube frame cars from scratch (www.midlana.com and www.kimini.com) using the typical tube notcher and hole saws. It worked fine, but was messy, the cutters are not intended for use on curves surfaces, and quality control was only "meh." That last bit means that the hole saw usually wobbles or has some offset. As a result, the end product isn't as precise as it could be—but the reality is that it usually doesn't matter due to all the other variables involved. The only real issue is the course pitch of the teeth; if someone started making fine-pitch hole saws, there's probably enough business that it would be viable.
I found 10TPI (teeth per inch) from a company called RockHardToolz. I bought two bimetal hole saws in 1 1/4” diameter.

MSC and a cursory Google search only turned up 4-6TPI, most of which were variable pitch.

I also bought three different 3/4” shank hole saw arbors which was all that the internet seemed to offer. I will post pictures of them when they arrive.

When I was in bicycle frame building school, I thought that there might be a consumer demand for thin tubing cut at a 60° angle for people to practice TIG welding. When these miters are cut on a mill, you have to clean/fit them up with a hand file and Emery cloth. The muffler tubing is cheap enough; maybe somebody could do this as a side gig.
 

stupoty

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do not use the locking pins, as they allow the cutter to wobble around and it will cut oversize. You want an arbor that screws in tight.

I stopped using the pins on the hole saws in the mill or drill press and have found them much better on both.

Getting them off is sometimes fun :)
I vice up the arbour and use metal "sticks" in the slots in the walls of the cutter.

Stu
 

savarin

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I have used bimetal hole saws for heaps of angle and off set cutting in steel when I was building recumbent bikes.
This wall and some thicker square tube.
Sometimes using just the power hand drill and sometimes the drill press.
Occasionally it cut oversize but then I just filled the gap with weld.
Most of the time it worked with no problems.
I've also used giles tube mitre program and cut the tubes and filed by hand.
 
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