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Bedroom Machine Shop Build

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wildo

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#1
Starting this thread to document a new machine shop I'm putting together in my very seldom used spare bedroom. The intention is that the room is primarily a machine shop, but can be converted into a guest bedroom when needed. This room is 10.5' x 12' with an additional closet. I'm choosing this bedroom for a number of reasons:
  1. I do woodworking, wood turning, auto maintenance, and welding projects in my garage. As well as park my car in there. There's simply no room for more tools!
  2. I like the notion of climate control for my machine tools since I already have a difficult time keeping my table saw and bandsaw tables rust free. My garage is not climate controlled.
I'm completely new to machining and it's been a life-long dream to break into this hobby. It'll be slow going as I already have 30 other really expensive hobbies to focus on. Never the less, I'm really excited to get this moving along. I'm going to approach this project in a number of phases.

Phase 1: Room prep. I'll paint the ceiling and walls. I'm going to install a 20A recep in the room. The hardwood floor needs refinished, but that almost seems silly when I'm going to be moving in a bunch of heavy machines and getting swarf all over. Instead, I'm considering a floor covering not so different from those floor tiles people put in their fancy garages.

Phase 1.5: Murphy bed. I don't really want to address building the murphy bed right away. It's honestly not a priority project for the build. That said, the bed is in the way... I don't think I'll address this as the second phase, but I'll probably start it while in the middle of Phase 2.

Phase 2: Lathe bench. Tonight I took delivery of a 120" x 30" x 1.75" butcher block maple bench top from Grizzly. It's massive; it's heavy; and it's awesome. I'm beside myself. It's the first purchase I've made for this whole project and I can't wait to get it setup. To do that, I need to fabricate the steel bench to put it on. It's not really a huge project, but it does involve lots of garage time right as it's starting to get super cold. Not my favorite time to be working in the garage. Wrapping up this phase will be my lathe purchase (a South Bend 9A) hopefully in February.

Phase 2.5: Bandsaw/Bench accessories. There's no real building involved with this phase. But the SB 9A has only a 3/4" spindle bore and therefore I'll need a convenient way to turn larger diameter stuff. It seems reasonable that a horizontal bandsaw sets me up well for beginning some turning work. Also included would be a bench grinder for grinding cutting tools- and I'm always on the lookout for a restorable Atlas/South Bend/Walker Turner bench drill press. I don't know if the restoration would be part of this phase or not.

Phase 3: Workbench. This phase will include building the dog leg for the workbench, and purchasing the tool cabinets for the room. This bench is 60" long and serves as an assembly table as well as a convenient place for a surface plate. This might also be a good time to build a workbench into the murphy bed. While the main assembly area will be nice, I'm not convinced that the lack of a toe kick space won't be super annoying. Therefore I'll build a bench into the murphy bed as well that I can pull a chair up to.

Phase 4: Milling machine. This one just has to wait. This project is already going to cost a small fortune. I don't foresee reaching this point at least until next year. But the plan is a PM-25MV or PM-727M mill sitting on top of a Harbor Freight 27" wide cabinet. If I end up getting the heavier mill, I'll enclose the cabinet in a steel frame for better support. Also, I'll likely need to add some blocking in the crawlspace to support this heavier mill.

_______________
Well- that was a lot of words, but I think typing it out helped me solidify some thoughts and build order. Below you can see my plans (to scale) modeled in Google SketchUp. Enjoy!

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.20.52%20AM_zps3gkfeiwf.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.19.29%20AM_zpssuqqyyax.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%202.58.22%20AM_zps294mosvl.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%202.57.09%20AM_zpsouez06ez.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.10.56%20AM_zpssslwauzv.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.09.28%20AM_zpsiycfda6e.png

This is the Phase 2 bench:
Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.28.47%20PM_zpso5yqdy79.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.29.46%20PM_zpscu0rsmcx.png

This is the Phase 3 bench:
Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.31.04%20PM_zps58lafrga.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.32.53%20PM_zps4sd5on2z.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-31%20at%201.00.59%20AM_zpsfy62yfji.png
 

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Last edited:

CarlosA

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#2
Amazing, will be watching this. Especially interesting to me because my own machine shop is in an apartment spare bedroom. Good luck!
 

FOMOGO

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#3
In a perfect world we would all sleep with our machines, right. Well, maybe make time for a super-model once in awhile.:) Sounds like a good use of available space to me. Mike
 

Chipper5783

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#4
Go for it. I've seen it done before. It was on the 2nd floor of a 3 story apartment building. The guy simply put plywood over the carpet.
 

uncle harry

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#5
Starting this thread to document a new machine shop I'm putting together in my very seldom used spare bedroom. The intention is that the room is primarily a machine shop, but can be converted into a guest bedroom when needed. This room is 10.5' x 12' with an additional closet. I'm choosing this bedroom for a number of reasons:
  1. I do woodworking, wood turning, auto maintenance, and welding projects in my garage. As well as park my car in there. There's simply no room for more tools!
  2. I like the notion of climate control for my machine tools since I already have a difficult time keeping my table saw and bandsaw tables rust free. My garage is not climate controlled.
I'm completely new to machining and it's been a life-long dream to break into this hobby. It'll be slow going as I already have 30 other really expensive hobbies to focus on. Never the less, I'm really excited to get this moving along. I'm going to approach this project in a number of phases.

Phase 1: Room prep. I'll paint the ceiling and walls. I'm going to install a 20A recep in the room. The hardwood floor needs refinished, but that almost seems silly when I'm going to be moving in a bunch of heavy machines and getting swarf all over. Instead, I'm considering a floor covering not so different from those floor tiles people put in their fancy garages.

Phase 1.5: Murphy bed. I don't really want to address building the murphy bed right away. It's honestly not a priority project for the build. That said, the bed is in the way... I don't think I'll address this as the second phase, but I'll probably start it while in the middle of Phase 2.

Phase 2: Lathe bench. Tonight I took delivery of a 120" x 30" x 1.75" butcher block maple bench top from Grizzly. It's massive; it's heavy; and it's awesome. I'm beside myself. It's the first purchase I've made for this whole project and I can't wait to get it setup. To do that, I need to fabricate the steel bench to put it on. It's not really a huge project, but it does involve lots of garage time right as it's starting to get super cold. Not my favorite time to be working in the garage. Wrapping up this phase will be my lathe purchase (a South Bend 9A) hopefully in February.

Phase 2.5: Bandsaw/Bench accessories. There's no real building involved with this phase. But the SB 9A has only a 3/4" spindle bore and therefore I'll need a convenient way to turn larger diameter stuff. It seems reasonable that a horizontal bandsaw sets me up well for beginning some turning work. Also included would be a bench grinder for grinding cutting tools- and I'm always on the lookout for a restorable Atlas/South Bend/Walker Turner bench drill press. I don't know if the restoration would be part of this phase or not.

Phase 3: Workbench. This phase will include building the dog leg for the workbench, and purchasing the tool cabinets for the room. This bench is 60" long and serves as an assembly table as well as a convenient place for a surface plate. This might also be a good time to build a workbench into the murphy bed. While the main assembly area will be nice, I'm not convinced that the lack of a toe kick space won't be super annoying. Therefore I'll build a bench into the murphy bed as well that I can pull a chair up to.

Phase 4: Milling machine. This one just has to wait. This project is already going to cost a small fortune. I don't foresee reaching this point at least until next year. But the plan is a PM-25MV or PM-727M mill sitting on top of a Harbor Freight 27" wide cabinet. If I end up getting the heavier mill, I'll enclose the cabinet in a steel frame for better support. Also, I'll likely need to add some blocking in the crawlspace to support this heavier mill.

_______________
Well- that was a lot of words, but I think typing it out helped me solidify some thoughts and build order. Below you can see my plans (to scale) modeled in Google SketchUp. Enjoy!

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.20.52%20AM_zps3gkfeiwf.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.19.29%20AM_zpssuqqyyax.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%202.58.22%20AM_zps294mosvl.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%202.57.09%20AM_zpsouez06ez.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.10.56%20AM_zpssslwauzv.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-20%20at%201.09.28%20AM_zpsiycfda6e.png

This is the Phase 2 bench:
Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.28.47%20PM_zpso5yqdy79.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.29.46%20PM_zpscu0rsmcx.png

This is the Phase 3 bench:
Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.31.04%20PM_zps58lafrga.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-28%20at%203.32.53%20PM_zps4sd5on2z.png

Screen%20Shot%202015-12-31%20at%201.00.59%20AM_zpsfy62yfji.png
Nice work on your graphics ! It appears as though you can raise or lower the drill press table to allow long rods thru the quill. The drill press table could hold a v block to act as a steady rest.
 

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planeflyer21

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#6
Looking forward to watching your progress on this.

We were contemplating moving our daughter's room to a new addition, in the back of the house, and then converting her current room to an in-house shop.
 

wildo

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#7
Nice work on your graphics ! It appears as though you can raise or lower the drill press table to allow long rods thru the quill. The drill press table could hold a v block to act as a steady rest.
You know- I didn't even consider that. I *did* purposefully put the headstock away from the wall so that longer material could be run through the quill, but it didn't dawn on me that the drill press table could act as a steady rest in this situation. Good call!
 

wawoodman

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#8
Did you model the tools and toolboxes or were they in the Sketchup library?

Great job!
 

AR1911

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#9
Cool project. Following
 

stupoty

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#10
Looks like a well planed small space, the only thing i wouldn't put the bench grinder in their, the dust is ow so small and gets every where. Although you look to have planned for that with the dust extractos so maybe ? Hummm

Stuart
 

middle.road

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#11
......
  1. I like the notion of climate control for my machine tools since I already have a difficult time keeping my table saw and bandsaw tables rust free. My garage is not climate controlled.

Hi, give some Minwax Finishing Paste Wax (or similar) a try on the power tools. For me it seems to be keeping the rust at bay.
The only items not rusting in my shop lately have been the ones that I had coated with it earlier this summer.
I'm going over the machine tools now and putting it on the non critical exposed areas.
 

AR1911

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#12
At the risk of steering this post down a side-track, I agree with the wax suggestion. Seems to be SOP for woodworking. I solved my rust issues on my metalworking tools a few years ago with a pound of pure lanolin from ebay. Nothing has rusted since except for spots I missed with the lanolin. I also keep the ceiling fan on High when I am not there. Unheated steel building.
 

wildo

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#13
Did you model the tools and toolboxes or were they in the Sketchup library?

Great job!
The exact box wasn't in there, but there was a model that was close. I did some minor tweaking to it, and then used the skew tool to get it to the correct dimension. The SB lathe was already in the warehouse as were the other machines.

[EDIT]- I just uploaded the models to the SketchUp Library. The model titles are:
"Harbor Freight 44" 13 Drawer Tool Chest" and
"Harbor Freight 44" 13 Drawer Tool Chest with 7 Drawer 18" Side Cabinet"
 
Last edited:

wildo

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#14
At the risk of steering this post down a side-track, I agree with the wax suggestion. Seems to be SOP for woodworking. I solved my rust issues on my metalworking tools a few years ago with a pound of pure lanolin from ebay. Nothing has rusted since except for spots I missed with the lanolin. I also keep the ceiling fan on High when I am not there. Unheated steel building.
Thanks guys- I'll give it a shot! The rust isn't *that* bad on my woodworking tools, in fact- it's pretty minor. But it definitely is enough such that material doesn't exactly glide over my tablesaw top. I'll give the wax a shot; seems like a good idea!
 

wildo

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#15
Looks like a well planed small space, the only thing i wouldn't put the bench grinder in their, the dust is ow so small and gets every where. Although you look to have planned for that with the dust extractos so maybe ? Hummm

Stuart
True- the bench grinder would get dusty, no question. I have planned for dust extraction/swarf removal via a shop vac and cyclone separator, but to be honest- I overlooked the dust from the bench grinder. I don't think it would be too hard to make a hood type device to hook to the dust collection like this:
26412-01-1000.jpg

Good observation!
 

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stupoty

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#16
True- the bench grinder would get dusty, no question. I have planned for dust extraction/swarf removal via a shop vac and cyclone separator, but to be honest- I overlooked the dust from the bench grinder. I don't think it would be too hard to make a hood type device to hook to the dust collection like this:
26412-01-1000.jpg

Good observation!
I need a dust extraction to use with my bench grinder, I've made a plinth type stand for mine and try to drag it out side when I do any substantial grinding, I touched up a tool bit on it the other day inside the workshop and it was like a very fine cloud had filled the room :-0 yup I need extraction I thought (or a warmer pull over) :)

I recently made a small "spray booth" type filter to use when I'm air brushing models I got a large pleated HVAC filter on ebay for it. needs a lot of suction though.

Stuart
 

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John Hasler

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#17
Oh. *spare* bedroom. I was thinking "Let me see. The mill can go in the corner if I rehang the door to swing the other way. The lathe could go next to the dresser, but that would block the window. Where to put the bandsaw? Better put the grinder out in the hall. Long stock can be stored under the bed..."
 

ELHEAD

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#18
And what will a night at these luxury accommodations cost ?
Seriously I am impressed with your planning within a small envelope.
I have too many interests and find my 40 x 60 and numerous out buildings too confining ( too much STUFF).
I look forward to seeing more of your progress.
 

AR1911

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#19
Look for a bench grinder with a vacuum exhaust connection, Alternately consider a belt sander. With the proper metalworking belt, it can do most of what a bench grinder does, often better, and most come with a vacuum exhaust connector.
 

TOOLMASTER

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#20
it's a slippery slope, next thing you know you have a toolbox in every room, and let me tell you the are hard to get upstairs..
 

juiceclone

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#21
Don't know WHAT u can do about it, but nice pointy/sharp bits are going to get tracked thru the house. My mess is way outside and still a problem.
 

extropic

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#22
Swarf, dust, mist & liquid control are primary concerns.

I wouldn't put the band saw in there at all. Think about it. You'll have to carry longer pieces of stock, through the residential area, into a confined space, to cut them shorter (bad idea). Also, the band saw consumes too much valuable floor space. Leave it in the garage to support your welding projects. Cut the machining stock out there.

Maybe you could incorporate your bench grinder (all abrasive power tools) directly onto your vacuum cart to free up bench space and facilitate contamination control. There are many 'quick mount' ideas around to swap-out grinders/sanders if need be. Grind while seated so the whole thing still rolls back under the bench. Buy a QUIET vacuum so it's not a PITA to use it.

You don't show a bench vise yet (necessity).

Have you fully considered the social ramifications of having a machine shop inside your residence (rhetorical question)?
 

wildo

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#23
Have you fully considered the social ramifications of having a machine shop inside your residence (rhetorical question)?
Good points, but the nice thing about living alone is that I can give a big middle finger to "social ramifications" of what I do in my house. ;) Noise is a nonissue since it's just me. Smell will be mitigated through a room air filtration system hanging on the ceiling like in woodworking shops. Tracking swarf will be managed via non-fibrous flooring (garage tiles) that can be easily cleaned. Dust? Well... I live with two German Shepherds! Dust is a fact of life for me.

Now coolant... yes, this is a concern that I haven't figured out yet. I won't use flood coolant, just cutting fluids. I can deal with cutting fluid being flung around on the lathe by using a backsplash behind the lathe and wearing an apron. Over at the mill though, I don't have a particularly good way to catch the oil from being slung all over. I have seen pictures of guys who create what looks like a grease tray you'd put on a camp stove for cooking bacon around the table on their mills. This is likely what I'll do.

Regarding the vice, I did realize that I left it out of the drawing. I'd likely mount it to the right of the lathe- on the corner by where I'm showing the bench grinder.
 

wildo

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#24
Oh- and on the topic of long material: I'm a newbie, some I'm not sure if there are "standard lengths" of material. That said, I don't foresee working with (or rather- purchasing) material over 4' long given the projects I'm interested in making. In fact, the SB 9A that I'm purchasing is sadly the 36" bed model. The need for the horizontal bandsaw is to cut a... 'short' piece off of a length of material so I can machine it in the mill or lathe. So moving loooooooong lengths of material through the house is of no concern to me. It's a good point, but considering that I want to make spinning tops and very small steam engines- I don't see a reason to buy very long lengths of material.
 

rwm

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#25
wildo- I have my shop set up in a spare room in the house 12 x 15 ft, similar to your idea. Although no one sleeps there! I routinely deal with all the concerns that have been raised. I have a Jet bandsaw inside. I generally cut any long stock out in the garage with an angle grinder or portaband. The most annoying issue is tracking chips through the house. Sharp chips can embed in the hardwood floors if you step on them. Dust has not been a big issue if I keep the door closed. The angle grinder is a big offender in this regard. I do TIG weld occasionally with a fume extractor. I do not use any flood coolant...yet.
I have placed jack posts in the basement at strategic locations. I can't say the indoor shop is optimal, but it is better than watching expensive equipment rust in an unheated damp garage. Someday I will have a dedicated shop in a separate building.
R
 

extropic

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#26
"Broadly speaking, a rhetorical question is asked when the questioner himself knows the answer already or an answer is not actually demanded. So, an answer is not expected from the audience. Such a question is used to emphasize a point or draw the audience’s attention." http://literarydevices.net/rhetorical-question/

As to the rest of it; You're right, you're right. You're absolutely right.
 

wrat

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#27
Been following this with some interest because it seems it could turn into something.

Maybe I could offer a word about the abstract concept of "dual purpose". Simply put, it doesn't really exist. For example, a motorcycle. It can somewhat do dirt and can still be ridden on the street, so it's labeled "dual purpose" but in reality, doesn't do especially great at either. Of course, fans of the concept (such as I) are fine with that because there's no need going nutty in any special direction. Flying cars are another wildly pursued undertaking with the exact same results. The importance of all this babbling is an interesting paradox that results. That is, the more you pursue having BOTH, the less you have of EITHER. The more effort put into a good driving car, the more abysmal it will be when wings are attached. To make it a performing plane, so much of the automobile componentry becomes superfluous that it's simply dead weight. After sufficient compromises are made (and there's always many), it becomes either an encumbered car or a death trap with a steering wheel.

Obviously, these are complex examples. But in your case, the same realization should take place. The choice is simple. Is this a 1) bedroom you can do some machining in? or 2) a machine room you can sleep in? This distinction is real, IMO. Considering the furnishings, I'm thinking you're already leaning toward option 2. Then i read this:
Dust is a fact of life for me.
Y'know, i live on a farm and tend to keep the dirt out. Which is why I wouldn't have the grinder in there. Of course, I'm funny that way. I'd have the grinder out with the woodworking stuff because that's where the dust is. I don't have my grinders anywhere near my mills and lathe because that grit goes everywhere and invariably settles where it can do the most damage. Cutting you can do with appropriate feeds and speeds to minimize debris, but grinding is always gonna be a mess.

So why would any of this matter? I mean, right, it's your house and none of my business. But i think this is bigger than we might imagine. Remember this post?
And what will a night at these luxury accommodations cost ?
I think you're on to something.

Those of us that remember when the "bed and breakfast" craze was starting, also remember when the "winery cottage" and "fantasy camp" ideas also followed. Ordinary people that know almost zippo about winemaking or football paying enormous sums to spend a night or two with those that do.

I see your modest bedroom here as something that could really grow legs. It would appeal to the neophyte and craftsman, alike. A niche market to be sure, but by indications, a steady one.

For every guy that owns a machine, there's a hundred or more that would love to but cannot. Okay, come stay at the "Bed and Boremill" (I dunno...) or the "Spindle House" (whatever) where we have a far reaching curriculum of machining experiences for the first-timer and experienced machinist, alike.

Sure, this is not where you're going, but someday, someone will. When these things start popping up all over, you can say you started the whole thing right here on this list. :)

Wrat
 

planeflyer21

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#28
Don't know WHAT u can do about it, but nice pointy/sharp bits are going to get tracked thru the house. My mess is way outside and still a problem.
I used to work 10 miles away and chips were still a problem.
 

wildo

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#29
Wrat- I really enjoyed your post! I have a couple friends on facebook trying to get me to remove the bed stating that it's an impractical waste of space. I, for one, very much enjoy the notion of a "themed" bedroom, if you will. Certainly this is the latter, as you stated- a machine shop with a bed. But what a fun bedroom it will be! I don't think my room will turn into "Bed and Boremill" but I also think it's a fun idea! Hell- I might make up a sign to hang outside the room. :)
 

wildo

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#30
I think it's really amazing the interest and comments this thread has generated. Thanks everyone for your thoughts and opinions! Some good things have been brought up. I can't guarantee that this build will move at a quick pace as I'm building/purchasing only as I have the money to do so. As you all know- it's such an expensive undertaking...

Here's the first real pictures. They aren't much, but they are progress! The 120" x 30" x 1.75" butcher block maple top from Grizzly arrived and is moved into the house. It took three of us and came directly into the room through a window:
10363125_10153872478682235_8028351768605028609_n_zpsxubjdswp.jpg

And today I went to my awesome local steel supply and got all of the pieces for the long bench. This is a small "mom & pop" kind of steel supply specializing in small cuts. All of my pieces were cut to length by the supply. Super service and super prices! The steel is 2" square tube 11ga, and the angle is 1.5" x 1.5" x 3/16". The dog is my Belgian Malinois. :)
8374_10153877000442235_952857610155824758_n_zpsc7j6l50p.jpg

The ceiling was painted last night, and I'm painting the walls this weekend. Wallpaper will likely go up during the week next week.

And finally, I was researching flooring and I'm stuck between rubber horse matting (which may get chips embedded over time) or garage floor tiles (which are a hard plastic and assumedly would be more/less impervious to chips). I updated the drawing to included wall paint (a blue/grey that matches my home office) and wallpaper (the brick- also in my home office) as well as the flooring. Here's the current rendering:
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