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Bedroom Machine Shop Build

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Aaron_W

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I see you have the Millrite (aka Rockwell). I am interested in those but I understand they weigh 1100lbs. My shop floor is wood so...maybe? I assume your floor is slab? I did not see pics of you moving it? Did you disassemble it for moving? What was that process? I am going through the same calculus you did about the PM 727, PM 30 , Millrite, etc.
Robert
I think a lot of people under estimate the loads a properly built wood floor can take. 100 gallon fish tanks are not uncommon in homes and nobody seems concerned about that. That is 834 pounds just for the water, then you have the cabinet, glass tank, pumps, filter etc which easily add up to several hundred pounds. Total weight is probably pretty close to that 1100lbs.

A small twin size waterbed can weigh 1300lbs.

Here is a short article on floor loads from a safe company

Will a raised floor support a safe
 

Latinrascalrg1

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I realize this is an old thread that has been revived so my comment is more so just me thinking aloud.

Turning a spare bedroom into a machine shop is a definite challenge for creative use of space for which I have a suggestion that I think may be of some value in both the workshop and bedroom aspects of the design.

My idea is simply to allow enough space between the bench top surface and the tool boxes beneath them to build and fit a folded "table extension" that is large enough to cover the entire front area of the work benches when extended.
These "table extensions" can be used as more workbench surface area in "workshop-mode" or as Aesthetic toolbox covers when in "Guest-mode" as they hide away what doesnt need to be seen plus if you wish, the "table extension covers" can also be locked down to restrict access to the tool boxes if ever needed.
Anyway just a suggestion that may help improve on an already creative idea or not, either way works for me :)
 

rwm

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I think a lot of people under estimate the loads a properly built wood floor can take. 100 gallon fish tanks are not uncommon in homes and nobody seems concerned about that. That is 834 pounds just for the water, then you have the cabinet, glass tank, pumps, filter etc which easily add up to several hundred pounds. Total weight is probably pretty close to that 1100lbs.

A small twin size waterbed can weigh 1300lbs.

Here is a short article on floor loads from a safe company

Will a raised floor support a safe
OK then. I'm getting a Bridegport....
Robert
 

wildo

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I see you have the Millrite (aka Rockwell). I am interested in those but I understand they weigh 1100lbs. My shop floor is wood so...maybe? I assume your floor is slab? I did not see pics of you moving it? Did you disassemble it for moving? What was that process? I am going through the same calculus you did about the PM 727, PM 30 , Millrite, etc.
Robert
Sorry- I didn't see this post. My floor is not a slab, but rather typical 2x12 floor joists. I didn't have any issues but just because I did go into the crawlspace and prop up the floor direct to the ground. That really solidified the flooring- even though I don't believe it was needed overall.

As far as moving the mill, you can see more pics here: https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/i-bought-my-first-milling-machine.48864/
 

rwm

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Thanks. I remember that now. 2015 seems like yesterday. Now I am torn about getting the PM727 or some old iron like the Millrite.
And I was mistaken above when I wrote aka Rockwell. I was confused.
Robert
 
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wildo

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Well... going from an entirely warn out SB9 with a ton of wear to a new PM 1236-T with zero wear, I know what my suggestion would be. The reality is that the new machine tools are UGLY. Square, boxy, dumb colors, and simply uninspiring. Whereas the old iron is pleasant to look at and almost beckons you to come make something cool. That said, I'm so done with dealing with massive amounts of wear and slop. On top of that, there are a couple threads on here indicating the massive challenge of putting a DRO on the Millrite- a project I'll be tackling here shortly.
 
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