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Easy fix for worn out Bridgeport (style) spindle brake shoes

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chrislb

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Was doing a quick maintenance job on the J-Head today ... it needed a new belt and the spindle brake just wouldn't brake (I guess the previous owner had 'ridden' it), but I couldn't afford a long down-time waiting for (expensive) brake shoes to arrive.

I was doing what I do best (standing over it and pondering) when I came up with a really nifty way of getting a few more years out of those old brake shoes....

I made a 1/2" bushing, drilled to be a close fit on the brake pivot screw that is opposite of the brake shaft. It pushes the 'hinged' side of the brake shoes out far enough that the brake lever now only has about 25 degrees of movement before the brake engages, rather than just freely flopping around as it did before.

A 20-minute, 10 cent fix ... I like it...

Now, just a $9 belt from ebay and I'll be back in action!!

When I get all the crud cleaned off the top housing and get the brake shoes back in there for good, I'll post some pics.
 

LJP

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I would be interested in those pictures. Thanks in advance.
Larry
 

george wilson

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My Hardinge HLVH just uses cork as a brake. Would that work for brake shoes on the mill?
 

chrislb

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My Hardinge HLVH just uses cork as a brake. Would that work for brake shoes on the mill?
Im not sure that cork would be rigid enough to machine the entire brake shoe from, but it may be possible to line the existing shoes with it .... I believe the original shoes are made from a phenolic material.

Does anyone else have further insight on this topic ?
 

Senna

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When I needed to replace the brake pads on my 1954 Gorton 9J mill I just cut the proper shape out of a new automotive disc brake pad and fitted them to the mill.
Worked perfectly and a low cost solution for an unavailable part.

Not sure if the B'port brake system is similar to the Gorton system however.
 

Bill C.

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When I needed to replace the brake pads on my 1954 Gorton 9J mill I just cut the proper shape out of a new automotive disc brake pad and fitted them to the mill.
Worked perfectly and a low cost solution for an unavailable part.

Not sure if the B'port brake system is similar to the Gorton system however.
Do you use non asbestos pads? If not how do you machine it, precautions do you use. I had a project years ago where I drill asbestos to make brake linings for some sort of machine used in production. A couple of us did different tasks to complete these things. I drill them under a slow stream of coolant to wash away the shavings. Then all that coolant was drain after the job was completed.

Thanks,
 

Senna

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Do you use non asbestos pads? If not how do you machine it, precautions do you use. I had a project years ago where I drill asbestos to make brake linings for some sort of machine used in production. A couple of us did different tasks to complete these things. I drill them under a slow stream of coolant to wash away the shavings. Then all that coolant was drain after the job was completed.

Thanks,
I didn't use any special precautions and since I only made the two pads and since I won't likely need to do it again in my lifetime I figured I was safe enough.
I imagine you'd be exposed to more asbestos just changing the pads on your car than you would be making a set of pads for your mill.

By all means wear a good respirator and cut it wet though to minimize any risk.
 
D

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I though the brake shoes on the Gortons were cast iron? Never had to replace them, but they sure looked like cast iron to me.

The brake shoe on my 645 Index mill is yellow brass. So far it's holding up.
 

fastback

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There are places that re-band brake shoes. You may be able to have is done locally. Today they use an adhesive shoes and not so many rivets. I think many may have material that is free from asbestos now.


Paul
 

Senna

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I though the brake shoes on the Gortons were cast iron? Never had to replace them, but they sure looked like cast iron to me.

The brake shoe on my 645 Index mill is yellow brass. So far it's holding up.
Mine were made just like disc brake pads with friction material bonded to a metal backing plate.
There are two of them operated by a screw with both LH and RH ACME threads and the pads clamp down on the top and bottom faces of the spindle pulley.
I know the earlier Gorton's had a different brake system but both of my 1950's models have a system as I described.
 

stevecmo

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I'm not familiar with the innards of a Bridgeport, but maybe this will help. My Rockwell mill has a phenolic brake shoe. It was shot so I made a new one when I refurbed the mill.

P1050661.jpgP1050681.jpg

There's a cam that goes in the slot. When you turn the lever it expands the shoe into the pulley.

Hope that helps.

Steve

P1050661.jpg P1050681.jpg
 

HSS

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Senna, my 9J has the same brake system as yours but my shoes are still good. I had to go thru the gear box when I bought mine because several of the gears on the big cluster were worn off. Arky made me a new gear cluster and it works great now, but the other day when I turned it on, I noticed neither the X drive shaft or the Y drive shaft would turn when I energized the table motor. I thought, crap, now I have to go into the gearbox again. Later on I realized I had the gearbox in neutral. Checked it today and put in gear and it worked perfectly. Its hell getting old!!!!!
Pat
 
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.....Later on I realized I had the gearbox in neutral....
I remember doing that a few times on the 9J's we had. I've also sheared off my share of those 6 penny nails on the feed rod coming out of the gear box, too!:whistle:
 

Ed ke6bnl

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Was doing a quick maintenance job on the J-Head today ... it needed a new belt and the spindle brake just wouldn't brake (I guess the previous owner had 'ridden' it), but I couldn't afford a long down-time waiting for (expensive) brake shoes to arrive.

I was doing what I do best (standing over it and pondering) when I came up with a really nifty way of getting a few more years out of those old brake shoes....

I made a 1/2" bushing, drilled to be a close fit on the brake pivot screw that is opposite of the brake shaft. It pushes the 'hinged' side of the brake shoes out far enough that the brake lever now only has about 25 degrees of movement before the brake engages, rather than just freely flopping around as it did before.

A 20-minute, 10 cent fix ... I like it...

Now, just a $9 belt from ebay and I'll be back in action!!

When I get all the crud cleaned off the top housing and get the brake shoes back in there for good, I'll post some pics.
Sure would be nice to get some more info on this modification and maybe a picture would help thanks.
 

Liljoebrshooter

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These are the brake shoes from my Gorton 1-22. They are just a normal looking brake pad material. 20180601_081504.jpg
 

markba633csi

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I was surprised to learn that asbestos-containing brake pads are still being sold- the cheaper ones are especially likely to contain it, particularly import pads. I thought they had banned them years ago
MS
 

middle.road

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This is on my to-do list for my BP Vari along with the belt. But I'm assuming/anticipating that there will be other issues once into the tear-down.
 

GL

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Big truck brake converted to non-asbestos linings in about '87. Would think cars changed over about the same time. With the legal issues, it be difficult to get any in this country and the demand may be so low that no one mines it anymore. Although, importers may have less issue for a machine tool part - China put some odd filler material in milk for awhile. Any car pad getting repurposed or a shoe getting relined would be safe. But interesting thought, some of our tools are much older than any ban that happened 30 years ago.
 
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