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Enco 12x36 Lathe Rebuild (Picture Heavy!)

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macardoso

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#1
Hi All, I recently purchased an Enco110-2033 gap bed lathe from a industrial surplus business for around $1100. It's more than some have spent on a lathe like this, but it was available nearby my house and in beautiful condition under the significant amount of grime that had coated it. This post will follow the process of inspecting a piece of equipment, picking it up (on a budget!), cleaning it, bringing it into a house, and setting it up for operation. I welcome any questions or comments on this (re)build as I go along.
 

Dave Paine

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#2
We love to see pictures of cleaning, restoration, etc.

Did the lathe come with any tooling or accessories?

Is this a belt drive or gear head lathe. I have a Grizzly G9249 belt drive which is 12x37.
 

macardoso

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#3
Chapter 1: The Find

An industrial surplus company nearby my house lists their equipment online and I had been following them to see if I could find a lathe. I couldn't justify a new lathe at this time and even for $2000, you can only get a 10x22 from Precision Matthews and that doesn't cover shipping and accessories. Don't get me wrong, I'd love a new lathe and I do love the look of the PM machines. One day, my soon to be lathe was listed for $1800 and shortly after was reduced to $1100. I went out to look at it with the usual tools (tenths indicator, rubber mallet, wrenches and such) and was pleasantly surprised at the condition the machine was in.
Lathe 2.jpg

It was very dirty and built in '94, but the grime gave way to beautiful ways with nearly non-existent wear, a spindle with .0001-2" runout at the spindle taper, and gears with a full compliment of teeth (a rare feat in some used lathes!). Even without a 4 jaw chuck, faceplate, or change gears, I felt it was too good of a deal to pass up so I bought it!

Pictures of the lathe as I found it:
Carriage.jpg

Change Gears 7.jpg

Tailstock 3.jpg

Electrical Panel 2.jpg

6 in chuck.jpg
Bedways and Wipers.jpg

(Are the bedways growing hair?!)
Apron.jpg

4 Way Toolpost.jpg
Bedways 2.jpg

Motor Nameplate.jpg
Headstock gears.jpg


Stay tuned for Chapter 2!

Ps: If anyone knows an easy way to rotate pictures when putting them in the post, please let me know! I'm new to this forum.
 

macardoso

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#4
Chapter 2: No spare parts you say?

I quickly realized that this lathe was more machine than I had worked with in the past, and having a solid supplier for spare parts and manuals was going to be important. I called up Enco (now MSC... ugh.) and was quickly informed that they discontinued the lathe in '99 and don't have spare parts. They were kind enough to provide an old manual with no useful information in it. As I browsed the forums, I learned that this was a popular lathe from China/Taiwan in the late 80's and early 90's.

Fortunately, many companies sold this lathe with varying paint colors, and our good friend Grizzly offered it under the name G9249 12x36 Gap Bed Lathe. Grizzly produces some amazing manuals for all their machines and has a good selection of spare parts available. I contacted Grizzly and was able to purchase the three missing metric change gears which should arrive in mid-June.

This lathe can swing a 12" part over the bed (18.88" over the gap) and 6.5" over the cross-slide. It has a 1.5 HP motor (220V 1P) with 12 speeds (50-1200 rpm) by changing v-belts and engaging a back gear). Max length is somewhere around 36" depending on the tailstock and centers. It has power feed and power cross feed, reversible feed and threading (left-hand), and separate leadscrew and feed rods. The spindle is 2.25 x 8 TPI, a relatively common spindle attachment, with a 1.57" bore.

Thanks to their manual, I have been able to figure out most of the mysteries of this machine! Just a fair warning, even though this lathe is the "same" as the G9249, there have been several issues which I have run into which I will explain later (hint, my tailstock was not an MT3).

Here are some pictures of the name plates, one of which show the required change gears to achieve metric threading:
Nameplate.jpg

Metric Thread Chart.jpg

QCGB.jpg


Up Next: Chapter 3: Getting it home... you need it down the basement?
 

macardoso

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#5
Dave, The lathe came with a 6" 3 jaw scroll chuck, a 4 way tool post, a live center (which was missing by the time I picked up the lathe) and a random drill chuck and big 2" shell mill which had fallen into the casting and I didn't know about until I got the lathe home. I purchased a 8" 4 jaw chuck, Quick Change Tool Post, live and dead centers, drill chuck, and the missing change gears. I'm still debating about buying the steady and follow rests from grizzly for $200 for the pair.

Lots of content to come, just have to find time to write it all up!
 

DAT510

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#6
Welcome to H-M,
Looks like your lathe is part of the Jet 1024/1236 family of lathes. Under the downloads section you'll find a number of manuals, in the Jet section, for the different brands the lathes were marketed under (Jet, LAM, Grizzly, etc.). Each of the manuals has different bits of info not necessarily covered in the others. Each lathe varied slightly in their specs, as you noticed with your tail stock.

For my Jet 1024, combining parts from each manual, I was able to piece together a manual that matched the specific specs of my lathe. (For example, my 1024 has a less common 2"-8tpi spindle).

As mentioned Grizzly can be a possible source for parts. I was missing the metric threading gears, I took a gamble and ordered a set from grizzly, they were a correct fit.

There's a decent following of H-M members with the Jet family of lathes.

I look forward to following your progress.
 

macardoso

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Chapter 3: Getting it home... you need it down the basement?

Unfortunately I do not drive anything with a tow hitch, and was trying to avoid crazy expenses to move the lathe 5 miles (one shipping company quoted me $400), so I was at the mercy of a kind coworker to help me get it home. We chose a chilly NE Ohio afternoon at the end of March to pick up the lathe.

I don't have an exact weight figure for the machine, but it is somewhere in the 700-1100 lbs range based on Grizzly's manual (minus the missing accessories). In order to handle the weight, I picked up a 1 ton engine hoist from Harbor Freight for around $140 on sale (This will be important soon!)

When we arrived, this beauty was outside waiting for me!

Lathe Pickup 2.jpg


Unfortunately it was almost an hour and a half before a forklift driver came to load it. Now many of you will cringe at the upcoming pictures, but I assure you we spent over an hour rigging the lathe and it was not moving at all! We managed getting it loaded sideways on the back-end of a F150 and didn't even bottom out the shocks.

Lathe on forklift 2.jpg

Lathe on Pickup 2.jpg

Lathe on pickup 3.jpg


Now the challenge was to get it off the truck without a forklift. I encourage anyone who needs to move equipment to seriously think through every possible situation, and half backup plans for when things don't go according to plan. Heavy equipment doesn't like rinky-dink rigging, and loves the smell of gravity.

My personal situation is that I need the machine down the basement in a split level house. There is a detached garage, which we chose to use for unloading the lathe, but it is not insulated and doesn't have power. I had plenty of people telling me that what I wanted was impossible and I should just set up a generator or buy a smaller lathe, but after planning it out, I was confident I could safety move the machine in and out of the house as needed.

We drove the 5 (pothole riddled) miles to my house and backed the lathe up to the garage. After all the considerations I made, I missed one: the lathe didn't fit under the garage door! So I jumped on the rear bumper of the car, pushed the door up, and just squeezed under (rubbing the weather stripping as we went!).
Lathe in Garage 2.jpg


To get the lathe off the truck, we rigged the bed to my shiny new engine hoist. Unfortunately the engine hoist was too short unless it was at the 500 pound setting, so we decided to continue very carefully (I was kicking myself for not buying the 2 ton hoist).

Engine Hoist.jpg


We spent an hour trying to get it off the truck, before we thought of unbolting the lathe from the base (duh). After that it was smooth sailing.

Lathe off Pickup.jpg

(That's my coworker, not me. Thanks J.)

That's all for right now, look for Chapter 4: "Man this thing is dirty"

Ps: The boats are whitewater kayaks.
 
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macardoso

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#9
DAT510, Thanks for the info. I have 5 or 6 different manuals, but Grizzly had the best out of all of them. I agree each has some unique info. I will have to check my spindle when I get home. I already bought a new 2.25" x 8 TPI chuck so I hope it's correct.

Ezduzit, it is definitely a bargain, but the wallet is hurting from all the expenses of the machine so it may have to wait a few months. Someone told me to expect to double the cost of any smaller machine in tooling and equipment (oil, moving expenses, missing parts, etc.). I also own a Grizzly G0704 mill, which might make a guest appearance later on, and I found this to be accurate.
 

Dave Paine

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#10
Nice pictures of getting the lathe home.

Your ENCO looks almost identical to my Grizzly. My Grizzly has a 2 step pulley on the motor so in theory I can get about the same speeds as yours. Changing the motor pulley belt at the motor is a pain, so I normally leave this in the "A" position and use the lower 3 speeds. One day I would love to upgrade to VFD and 3 phase motor. Just need the funds.

Grizly_G9249_latest_picture_8069.jpg


You may notice a small block above the ON/OFF lever on the carriage. A better view. My way to avoid the "brown-stain-in-the-underwear" when the lever goes through the detent and the motor goes from FORWARD to REVERSE. It is always scary.

I made this block of wood notched to fit on the bracket. A rare earth magnet and the thread dial to hold this in place. Now I cannot accidentally go into reverse. I remove this block only when threading.

Grizzly_block_to_prevent_reverse_3828.jpg
 

macardoso

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#11
Chapter 4: Man this thing is dirty

So now that the lathe was in the garage the fun could begin. Each night after work and cooking dinner, I would venture out with a headlamp and plastic tub to strip parts from the machine and carry them down the basement. I could only stand the cold for so long, so half of the time I would be cleaning parts in the basement.
Lathe Teardown.jpg

Lathe Lifting Strap Setup.jpg

(The big 2x4 was used to loosen the chuck)

Each part was meticulously cleaned and coated in a thin coat of oil to prevent rust. Each part was labeled with a number matching the grizzly parts list. Fortunately I only have 2 bolts which I failed to label, but they are big and I have confidence that they will identify themselves as I reassemble the lathe.

For reference, the basement was pretty and clean before this whole thing started (and before the mill and the rest of my tools arrived).
Basement Layout.jpg

Basement Layout 2.jpg


I don't have too many pictures of the actual cleaning, but you get the idea. I went through 8 rolls of paper towels, 2 bottles of rubbing alcohol, a bottle of citrus de-greaser, a jug of dawn dish soap, and a quart of engine oil. I found the rubbing alcohol to be the best for cleaning the sludge from the parts as it readily mixes with grease and oil and dries quickly (it does eat through the paint on the basement floor though). The citrus de-greaser worked well for some of the parts like the leadscrew which could be soaked overnight in a PVC pipe filled with the stuff, but wasn't great for general cleaning. I have read elsewhere that the citrus stuff will bleach the paint and etch metals, but I found it to be very mild and did not find any issues with its use.

Apron Gearbox Teardown.jpg

Apron Gearbox Junk.jpg


The collection of parts quickly grew and It started to consume the basement floor (I don't own workbenches yet).
Labeled Parts 2.jpg

Labeled Parts 3.jpg

Labeled Parts.jpg

Labeled Components.jpg


Some of the larger and dirtier items were cleaned in the garage whenever it was nice enough to do so.

The apron was partially disassembled for cleaning and flushed with lightweight oil. When I dumped this oil into my oil tub, several roll pins fell out. I carefully checked all the shafts in the gearbox and they all had their pins, so these must have fallen in during factory assembly and sat there until now. Free pins! (I needed one of these later after destroying a different one). It's much cleaner and shiner now!

Apron Gearbox after Cleaning 2.jpg


The quick change gearbox was fairly dirt free, but did not spin smoothly at all. I could barely spin the input shaft with all my strength. As I began cleaning it with a toothbrush, an incredible amount of grit and dirt started sloughing off. After 4 hours of cleaning and flushing with light oil, the gearbox spins smooth as silk and the input shaft can be turned between two fingers. I did replace the bearing on the keyed shaft which the arms are mounted to as they were blown (Open bearings in an open gearbox? Who thought that was a good idea?). I am impressed by the oiling system in this lathe, each bushing in the gearbox has a feed tube from an oil reservoir.

That's all for now. Stay tuned for Chapter 5: Hope the stairs can take it
 

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macardoso

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#12
Dave, thanks for that idea! Definitely going to do something similar. I heard rumors that the motor cannot be thrown in reverse as it is still spinning down or it will continue to run forward. Very jealous of your setup and tooling! DRO will definitely be needed in the future.
 

ezduzit

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#13
For cleaning use denatured alcohol and S100 motorcycle wheel cleaner.
 

ACHiPo

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#14
Great write up! Congrats!
 

macardoso

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#15
Chapter 5: The stairs say.... UGHHHH

So at this point just about everything was clean and I was able to grab a buddy to help move the base casting. I'd estimate it weighs around 250lbs or so and is awkwardly long. We planned everything out and got to work. The casting was lifted up on the engine hoist and rolled down the driveway to the side door of the house. We took the door off and built a crude ramp from 2x4's to slide the lathe down on. I drilled a small hole through the riser on one of the steps leading into the house to run some rope to a friction system chained to the floor joists.
Engine Hoist 2.jpg

Ramp.jpg

Ramp for Lathe.jpg

The plan was to ease the lathe onto the ramp manually and use belay devices to carefully let rope out and ease the lathe down the ramp. Belay devices are used in rock climbing for holding the rope for a climber and to arrest a fall. They are rated for several thousand pounds of shock loading and I had no concerns using them (we used two for redundancy).
Belay.jpg

(Not me again! Thanks A. for the help!)
Hole in stairs.jpg

Lathe in house 2.jpg

Lathe on Stairs 3.jpg

No more pictures from this point on, but the casting was lowered to the bottom where the engine hoist lifted it up and over to its final resting place

With some careful planning and reinforcement of the stairs, the move went without issues.

Up next: Chapter 6: Where did I put that one bolt? - part 1
 

macardoso

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#16
Chapter 6: Why do these things have so many parts?

With everything downstairs and cleaned, reassembly and alignment can take place. As we head into this chapter, understand that this is where things are right now, and I won't have another 6 chapters for tomorrow, but I'll keep this thread up to date as best as I can.

The headstock was lifted onto the bedways first, and I installed a Fenner (off brand Fenner) link V-belt between the motor and countershaft. I will test this out and replace the other belt too if I like it.
Headstock after cleanup.jpg

The back gear was adjusted to fully engage and everything was greased.

As an aside, if anyone has some advice on how to properly load a grease gun, please let me know. I probably wasted 4 hours trying to get it running, and even still I get 5-10 pumps and then it hits and air bubble and I have to spend another 20 minutes priming it. I'm going crazy. For grease I prefer Loctite ViperLube synthetic grease. It is odorless, clear, and forms long strings as it runs between the gears which really helps make sure it fully coats everything. It is rated as a high performance bearing and gear grease, and can be used in food product machines.

Next the quick change gearbox and change gears were installed and lubed. During greasing, one fitting snapped off at the threads. I ordered what I think to be the correct replacement and I will have to come up with a way to extract the other half from the hole. (You can see the missing one on the reverse tumbler gear just under the spindle.

Change Gears after Cleaning.jpg


The carriage was installed and the gib tightened. Its amazing that a feather touch to the gib adjustment screws can make it so tight that it will not move. Once my way oil (Mobil Vactra 2) arrives, I'm sure this will be less of an issue.

Carriage after Cleanup.jpg


Gearbox after cleanup.jpg


Next the apron and feed rod were installed. Since the feed-rod bracket was removed for cleaning, it needed to be aligned (if I had to do it again, I would not remove this part). It was particularly a pain because the part couldn't be reached by an Allen key when the apron was bolted on. My procedure was, move the carriage to the end of travel, loosen but not remove the carriage bolts and gently snug the bracket. Run the carriage back and forth along the travel, and the feed-rod will push the bracket into alignment. Then move the carriage all the way to the end of travel, drop it down again very carefully as to not change the bracket alignment and snug up the screws. This was repeated until the feed-rod spun smoothly across the full range of travel.

Half Assembled Lathe.jpg


And this is where things stand as of last night. I will continue to post updates as I have them.

Here is a picture of the el-cheapo QCTP I bought off ebay (Bostar AXA).
QCTP.jpg
 
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Dave Paine

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#17
Thanks for all the pictures and the story to get your lathe in the basement and cleaned up. I recently helped someone move a Sheldon 12in lathe into his basement so appreciate the effort.

I forgot to say before, welcome to the forum.

You will enjoy using the lathe when re-assembled. Taking it apart to clean will soon feel to be worth the effort.
 

FOMOGO

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#18
"When I was a boy" we used to tuck that lathe bed under an arm and carry it down the stairs. Just kidding, nice job, and a good write up. Cheers, Mike
 

macardoso

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#19
Chapter 6 Continued...

Didn't have too long to work last night but I do have a few updates. Got lucky with the spindle and the 2.25" x 8 TPI chuck fit without issue. Remeasured the bore now that is nice and clean and I'm seeing .00015" runout along the entirety of the MT5 taper, .0015 axial runout on the nose of the spindle (this should be easy to cleanup), and about .0001 or so of endplay when I push as hard as I can against the ends of the spindle. I assume with a threaded chuck this really means nothing since it will only seat on the threads, but oh well. I'll have to clean those up really nice.

Adapter Plate.jpg

Headstock 4.jpg


Next I assembled the leadscrew and spindle lever. This was fairly painless except that I forgot to put the bearing shroud on the leadscrew before I installed everything else so it all had to come apart again (I can almost hear my dad telling me to slow down). I had used some masking tape to hold the bolts in the bearing block that supports the screws at the tailstock end, and it ripped off all the paint under it when I peeled it off. I may repaint some parts down the road.

Leadscrew.jpg

Leadscrew 2.jpg

Leadscrew 3.jpg

(OK so you cant really see the missing paint in the photo, I'll have to get a better shot)

The biggest pain point was installing the spindle lever. There is nothing to retain it at the headstock end except for a bore, so it can easily back out of the hole without you noticing and fall off the roller arms of the micro-switches. When I pushed it back in, I bent one of the arms of the switch slightly. I was able to straighten it back out, but the clicking of the switch is not very reliable. I may order a spare from grizzly ($16 each), or better yet find a whole new brand or style of switch. I don't like the configuration on this lathe. Furthermore, the whole lever seems to be tensioned by a setscrew on the bearing block located near the tailstock. This seems a little hokey, and an 1/8 turn of the screw takes the lever from falling due to gravity to completely locked. I would much rather have a nice ball and spring detent system seen in many other places around the lathe.

As you can see in the above pictures, I did install the cross slide and adjust the gib. It moves very smoothly (although a little tight) with around .003-.004" backlash. I could easily adjust this out, but so far, that small amount of play is fine and I don't want to wear out the screw.

Cross Slide.jpg


It might be hard to see here, but the cross slide only has +/- 45 degrees of markings on it, and my compound slide only has a single line on the side (reads 0 when the compound is parallel to the ways). This is going to make it very annoying to set angles beyond 45 degrees. Is this what your lathes look like as well? I might have to carefully scribe a second line on the compound to read 0 when the slide is perpendicular to the ways.

Finally, both the cross slide and carriage hand wheels rub slightly when spun, and I'm pretty sure it is the vernier ring rubbing the casting. I'll have to blue it up to see where the transfer is and lightly sand the parts down for a better fit.

Carriage Handwheel 2.jpg

Cross Slide Handwheel.jpg


Still waiting on the spindle oil, so I can't run it in yet.

Questions for you guys:
1) What kind of paint is used on machine tools and where can you buy it? I know there are some more and less toxic varieties and I'd like to stick with something that can be rolled on if possible.
2) What is the trick for adjusting the spindle lever such that it is easy to use, but is not a risk of falling down (especially when in the up position)?
3) Has anyone tried alternative spindle lever designs?
4) What does your lathe look like as far as the angle markings on the compound slide?
5) What is the cheapest decent quality (oxymoron I know!) DRO one can find for a lathe?

Cheers,

Mike
 
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Dave Paine

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#20
Many options for paint. Take a look at YouTube videos like Keith Rucker, Halligan142 for example. They have done a number of restorations including painting.

I think you may need to replace the springs in the spindle lever, especially the one which pushes the lever into the "OFF" detent position. May need a stiffer spring(s).

My spindle lever feels fine so no need to consider redesign.

The markings on my compound slide stop at 55 deg, so worthless for threading. Why they did not go to 60 deg is a mystery.

My solution was to cut a piece of wood at the desired angle, insert a rare earth magnet, and use this to set the angle for the compound for threading.

Angle_block_to_set_threading_angle_7616.jpg


There are a number of threads on the forum about DRO recommendations. As you mentioned cheap and decent quality may not go together.

Yuriy's TouchDRO is perhaps the cheapest. Uses Android phone/tablet for display.

I have a Shooting Star CBX on my mill which is an inexpensive unit.

You need to decide on the type of scale. Glass scales have to be purchased at the correct length. I have glass scales on my Grizzly lathe. Works well.

The scale on the carriage is on the right so it covers the carriage lock.
 

middle.road

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#21
Nice pictures of getting the lathe home.

Your ENCO looks almost identical to my Grizzly. My Grizzly has a 2 step pulley on the motor so in theory I can get about the same speeds as yours. Changing the motor pulley belt at the motor is a pain, so I normally leave this in the "A" position and use the lower 3 speeds. One day I would love to upgrade to VFD and 3 phase motor. Just need the funds.

You may notice a small block above the ON/OFF lever on the carriage. A better view. My way to avoid the "brown-stain-in-the-underwear" when the lever goes through the detent and the motor goes from FORWARD to REVERSE. It is always scary.
1523368631859.png

I made this block of wood notched to fit on the bracket. A rare earth magnet and the thread dial to hold this in place. Now I cannot accidentally go into reverse. I remove this block only when threading.
Now that thar is an obvious solution. Wish I'd thought of it - about (5) years ago.
Just added this mod to my 'To-Do' list...
There have been times where mine does go into reverse, not quite sure how it does that though.
 

macardoso

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#22
Dave, I like your magnetic wood blocks for everything! I'll have to do something similar. I got to thinking that it would be pretty slick to install an absolute encoder inside the compound slide to read the angle back in high resolution.

Now that you mention it, I cleaned that tension spring and did not reinstall it tightly. I'll look at it tonight.

Is there any reason that the threading dial should not be left in contact with the leadscrew all the time?
 

Dave Paine

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#23
Is there any reason that the threading dial should not be left in contact with the leadscrew all the time?
There was a forum thread on this topic some months ago. A good subject to start the proverbial bar fight.

Some folks like to keep it engaged with the lead screw, some like to not have it engaged.

I am in the latter camp. I prefer not to have the wear on the thread dial when not in use. I know that my leadscrew is only rotating when I have the carriage in threading mode and the clutch engaged so the threading dial is only moving with the carriage.
 

spitfire_er

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#24
Would you be able to do me a favor and count your back gear teeth? Mine are broken on the small gear and I count 58/21. I was hoping to get a new gear from grizzly for a G9249, but they list 58/24. If I can get that fixed on my Enco 110-2034, I'm golden. I really don't want to try and do a braze and file job on those spiral gears.

If you are wondering about paint, I've done several machines that have held up extremely well and I was given the process by a professional machine rebuilder. You can also check out my youtube channel, I restored a South Bend Heavy 10 a couple years ago and the paint on that thing held up great. "Precision Machine Shed" on youtube.
 

macardoso

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#25
Spitfire_er, I will definitely do that after work today. Brazing wouldn't be fun at all (well the filing to shape part at least).

OK, that South Bend 10L is a seriously great restoration job. Beyond my skill level right now for sure. If you don't mind sharing, what does a scraping job like that cost (ballpark)?

We will have to chat about some gunsmithing once I get this up and running. I have some projects in mind.
 

macardoso

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#26
Chapter 6 Part 3:

So progress has been a tad bit slower, but I managed to finish up the mechanical assembly of the cross slide and tailstock.
Compound Slide 1.jpg


The compound slide nut is an interesting design. By leaving a set screw loose, the nut is free to pivot and can self align to the leadscrew. After extending the compound slide to the rear, I tightened up this screw and it runs smoothly without binding.

Compound Slide Nut.jpg

Compound Slide 2.jpg


Here is a shot of the mechanics behind the compound slide travel.

Compound Slide 3.jpg


Begin Rant: Seriously who puts the two most used features of the compound slide (slide lock and rotation lock) ON TOP OF EACHOTHER? You have to pull out the slide lock to change the angle of the compound. That's going to need to be replaced with a set screw or something.
Correction, it became clear to me that I'm an idiot and the compound lock only blocks the rotation bolt when the compound slide is in one position and I can just slide it out of the way. Duh! :bang head:

Compound Slide 4 - Copy.jpg

Compound Slide 5.jpg


Final beauty shot of the finished compound slide.

Compound Slide 6.jpg


Next I began work on the tailstock. This didn't take long as I did not fully disassemble it. The factory painted over several seams between the parts and I did not want to have to repaint. The slight rust stain on the nose of the tailstock and on the rear right bedway are the only two spots, and do not impair functionality. I'm pretty pleased with that.

Tailstock 1.jpg


The Enco version of this lathe does not have a graduated handwheel for the tailstock which limits it's usefulness in my mind. Grizzly's tailstock does come with the collar, but it might be a totally different design than mine. This part may need to be fabricated, but that wont be bad at all with a CNC 4th axis. All the locks were tightened up and the travel is very smooth. You can see my new keyless drill chuck from Shars in the picture.

Tailstock 4.jpg


I finally found where my two extra bolts went: the headstock cover hinges!

Missing Bolts.jpg

Missing Bolts 2.jpg

Missing Bolts 3.jpg


The rubber wipers were in great shape and I reattached them. The assembly is complete!

Completed Lathe.jpg


There are still a handful of things that need to be attached (The switch plate, a new rubber pad for the top of the headstock, tool post, etc.) but the mechanical assembly is complete for the most part.

The spindle is grossly out of alignment to the ways (wonder why that is ;)), so I'll need to tackle that soon!

In the next week or two keep an eye out for:
  • Tooling and workholding
  • Lifting the lathe onto the stand
  • Spindle bearing run-in, belt adjustment, gear adjustment, etc.
  • Electrical rebuild
  • Bed leveling, spindle alignment, tailstock alignment
  • Test cutting and more!
Until then, Cheers! - Mike
 
Last edited:

spitfire_er

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#27
Spitfire_er, I will definitely do that after work today. Brazing wouldn't be fun at all (well the filing to shape part at least).

OK, that South Bend 10L is a seriously great restoration job. Beyond my skill level right now for sure. If you don't mind sharing, what does a scraping job like that cost (ballpark)?
We will have to chat about some gunsmithing once I get this up and running. I have some projects in mind.
A re-grind and flake job like mine was close to $2k, but he did basically everything on the machine to bring everything back into spec.

I'm always open to questions, just let me know.

As for the gear, the grizzly manual states 58/24, but in their website for parts it states 58/21. I ordered a new one last night. Was about $120 with shipping. I figure that's worth it vs. my time trying to fix it with brazing and files.
 

macardoso

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#28
As for the gear, the grizzly manual states 58/24, but in their website for parts it states 58/21. I ordered a new one last night. Was about $120 with shipping. I figure that's worth it vs. my time trying to fix it with brazing and files
Awesome! I'll still count mine to make sure but it sounds like you have the correct one. That's totally worth it.
 

Dave Paine

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#29
The Enco version of this lathe does not have a graduated handwheel for the tailstock which limits it's usefulness in my mind. Grizzly's tailstock does come with the collar, but it might be a totally different design than mine. This part may need to be fabricated, but that wont be bad at all with a CNC 4th axis.
I read a post sometime last year where a person stated they had never used the dial on the end of their tailstock.

I use mine often when drilling on the lathe. I only use the scale on the front of the quill as a guide for how much to advance the quill before inserting drill chuck or live centre, which have different depths in the MT3 taper.

I use the dial to get close to my drill depth before checking with depth gauge, then may reset to 0 to make final pass before re-checking.

Tailstock_handwheel_scale_working_5837.jpg


I will be interested in future pictures of a project to add a dial to your ENCO lathe. For reference, this is a picture of my tailstock quill handle removed.

The handle has a normal keyway slot. The shaft has a hole for a round key, looks like a small piece of rod.

Grizzly_G9249_tailstock_screw_handle_8747.jpg
 

Silverbullet

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#30
Looks to me you did real well buying this lathe, I'd say great deal. Enjoying your clean up and adventures into machine life. YUPP it gets in and you love it. I'm an old machinist and my pads full of machine pictures of all kinds . Even my instogram and pinterest a few of guns the only true love of mine after family.
I think I'd make some stop to prevent instant reverse , strong spring in one direction may work. Good machinery enamel paint will work well. Also even tho you found the gear wouldn't be good learning experience to repair the old gear , I like pushing myself to try the tuff,,pita,, jobs just to do it. And since your new HI AND WELCOME TO THE SITE. Where no question is wrong.
 
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