[4]

G0704 CNC AC Servo Rebuild (Picture Heavy)

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Boswell

Hobby Machinist since 2010
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 27, 2014
Messages
743
nice progress. btw, I don't miss Windows XP at all.
 

spumco

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
240
Superb, thanks for sharing.

If you need any machine work while the mill is in surgery, let me know. I'm just up the road from you in Ashtabula. In addition to my own equipment, I have access to big stuff if you need it (60x30 cnc mills, surface grinders, and plasma tables).

-Ralph
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
In addition to my own equipment, I have access to big stuff if you need it
Now I am jealous :) Thanks for the offer! Right now things are churning along pretty well, but if I get stuck I'll let you know. You might be the closest geographically to me on this site that I've seen so far.
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
With what I completed last night, I think I am 100% done with panel internal wiring. All that's left from the controls point of view is to hook up the proximity sensors and mount the touchscreen PC.

Here is the pendant I purchased. It is surprisingly well built. I've gotten one of these cheap ones before for a school project and it was super flimsy. I'm pretty sure I could drop this and it wouldn't be damaged.

Here is the listing (it was $49 when I bought it a month ago): https://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-CNC-4-Axis-Pendant-MPG-Handwheel-Emergency-stop-Switch-controller-US/162243912680?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

I can stand about 6' in away from the front of the machine with the included pigtail.

The blue cable is the CAT 5 RS485 network cable.

287065

With the panel mounted, wiring is a bit of a pain but not too bad.

287066

The flying lead end of the pendant. I landed the shield (wrapped in heatshrink and a ferrule) on the ground connector of the 3 tier terminals. Wires are pretty thin, probably 26 AWG.

287067

Also I got the timing relay (white box, red dial).

287068

I am concurrently working on an AutoCAD Electrical drawing package. It is very much a work in progress, but I may consider posting it for people to reference if there is interest.

EDIT: Photo Temporarily Removed

The original length was a touch short, so I stripped it back further and cleaned up with more heatshrink.

287070

Timing relay wired to the power supply next to it. Power supply turns on, then 3 seconds later (one the output voltage is very stable) the relay turns on the voltage to one of the M12 panel connectors. The PC I'll be using had some issues with its power circuit where it wouldn't want to turn on if you plugged the power supply into the wall, but if the PS was already on and you closed a switch on the DC power, it had no issues. I'm just automating that process with the relay.

287071

I did a quick power check to make sure the relay worked and it is done!

Next up is either mounting the servos or the PC.

-Mike
 
Last edited:

spumco

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
240
Now I am jealous :) Thanks for the offer! Right now things are churning along pretty well, but if I get stuck I'll let you know. You might be the closest geographically to me on this site that I've seen so far.
I'd be happy to help anyone who wires a panel like you do... ;) How do you think I got access to the 'big' equipment? Make friends with useful people, and try hard to be useful to them.

BTW - if you run short of panel stuff give me a shout. I've got a pile of leftovers from my last two builds scavenged from HGR-sourced enclosures. DIN rails, control transformers, BOB's, relays, switches/buttons, terminal blocks, etc. This stuff needs to go away before I start anything new.

-R
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Spumco, Thanks!

Its fun to see who you meet through shared interests like this. I have to stay away from HGR, it can get dangerous for a wallet there. I won't buy any small stuff anymore from them because I always make up a reason I'll use it, and then never do. But I'm super happy with the lathe I got from them.

I should be good for the time being, but I'll keep that in the back of my head!
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Didn't get a ton done last nice since I got home from the gym pretty late, but I got the panel PC mounted to the machine. I previously had an industrial monitor that was hooked up to a desktop PC on the floor. Its resistive touchscreen stopped talking with the PC at some point and it wasn't very pretty to look at.

The new unit is something we scrapped out at work thanks to someone plugging it into a 50VDC power supply (it only runs on 24VDC). I had to do some surgery and replace some fried components right off of the motherboard, but it works (and I'm kinda proud of that). This unit is an integrated display, capacitive touchscreen computer running Windows 10. It isn't crazy powerful so I'm keeping my fingers crossed that it is enough to run Mach 4. If not I'll work something else out. It has a quad core Intel Atom E3845 CPU (1.91 GHz), 4 GB of RAM and a 128 GB solid-state drive.
287132

The computer is mounted on a $10 vesa monitor mount. Its a touch flimsy, but it seems to do the job. The mount was bolted straight to the column.

287133

It's alive!

287134

Watching some This Old Tony.

287135

I keep my keyboard and mouse on a tool cart along with my tool holder rack (put away at the moment), and Tormach presetting surface plate. I pressed magnets into the side of the cart to hold my prints while I'm working. The cart was a Christmas preset from my fiancee along with the stool. She knows what to get me :)

287137

And the whole basement setup. Its pretty messy thanks to this conversion work. I'm normally a neat freak about the shop. That is an ATC prototype on the floor...

287138

Waiting for the yellow and red buttons to come in from ebay. This will be my operator station.

287139

mMmmmmmm servo cables!

287140

Servo motors for the axes! The two small ones are .75kW (1HP) and the big one on the right is 1.8kW (2.4HP) same as the spindle. This will be for the Z axis. On the left is a .75kW motor mounted to an Alpha Wittenstein SP+ gearbox. It is 11:1 and moves pretty quick!

287141

Close up. This will be for a 4th axis that I'll get to building once the rest of the machine is done.

287142

I'll be using this 8x8x8 ground angle plate for the base of the 4th axis. Imagine a large hole bored clean through the face of the plate to receive the gearbox.

287143

And all the motors hooked up. I'll be testing like this for a long time until I feel comfortable about mounting the motors. At first I plan on torque limiting these guys to what my steppers could do (~425 oz-in). This way a crash won't damage the machine. Eventually I'll open up the limits to get some crazy accelerations.

287144

I have a Mach 3 setup that I have used to test all this in the past and I used it to quickly verify some signals, the mpg, and jog the motors. There are a few issues that might exist, but nothing too big of a deal.

287145

My plan for the weekend is to re-image the PC, install Mach 4, Putty (terminal emulator for RS485 testing), Ultraware (drives cfg.), and the ESS configuration. I want to get all the I/O checked out and working, and get the motors tuned. I may start some installation of the motor mounts and home/limit switches.
 
Last edited:

spumco

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
240
Holy Moley, that's a big harmonic drive.

You and I seem to be channeling each other...

[slight thread hijack]

287170287171
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Nice setup for the 4th axis! My gearbox is a low backlash planetary gearbox. Not as ideal as a harmonic drive, but it does have a massive crossed roller output bearing on the face that I hope will handle the loads. I figure this has to be better than a rotary table setup.
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
I don't have as many pictures as I'd like to share, but our furnace went out this weekend so any time I spent in the shop was not focused on taking a million pictures. The bedrooms got into the low 50's and the basement into the mid 40's (it is low 20's outside). Not terrible, but much less than ideal.

I re-imaged the computer back to a bare Win 10 machine. From there I installed Mach 4 and configured it for use with the Ethernet smoothstepper. I am very impressed with the menus in Mach 4. They seem to be laid out intuitively rather than the haphazard placement of settings in Mach 3. I did identify a few potential wiring errors on the I/O during some initial testing that I need to dig deeper into, however as it stands right now, each drive correctly receives the control input pins, as well as an enable signal. Each drive also sends back a fault signal and the encoder index output. This output gives actual speed feedback to mach for the spindle (pretty cool) as well as enables home to switch then to encoder marker which is more accurate than the switch alone. All the limit/home switches work properly, the ESTOP is working, and the pendant MPG is reading into Mach (although it seems to count by 4's?). I know that my "operator station" input (start, hold, and stop buttons) seems to only have the start button operational at the moment, and the pendant resolution selector switch seems to have the X10 and X100 inputs stuck on. I have not tested any of the outputs including the electronic gearing relays, the relay outputs for the 120V outlets on the side of the panel, or the power drawbar solenoid outputs. The panel internal outputs such as the drive enable and fault reset pins work perfectly.

I loaded Putty, a free terminal emulator, onto the computer as well as my laptop, and after an hour of fiddling with it, got the two PCs talking to each other over RS485. From there I connected the computer to the drives, but when I tried to connect, Ultraware (Allen Bradley utility for servo drive configuration) would just freeze up. It took me a little while to realize that every drive had its network node address set to node 0. When Ultraware tried to talk to the X axis drive, they would all answer at the same time. I had to power each one on, one at a time, to set them to different node addresses. Now whenever I open Ultraware it automatically connects to each drive that is powered on. This is hugely helpful for troubleshooting since every piece of data from the drives is exposed for monitoring and adjustment. Since I got the network working I have not had a single issue with it. If I can figure out Mach 4 LUA then I feel very confident that the networking of the drives will be very reliable.

I tested some jogging with Mach 4 and found it to be a bit unresponsive to keyboard inputs compared to Mach 3. There was a barely noticeable delay when starting and stopping a jog compared to the key press. It probably doesn't matter, but coming from industry it makes me a little uncomfortable when you can "feel" the software between you and the machine. My other, much more major, issue with Mach 4 is that it hangs after 3-5 minutes of running code. This is the demo version right now, but it is not the timeout (I have seen the timeout message and know what it looks like). The machine will be running and BANG, all the servos stop dead but remain enabled. The software ESTOP does not shut them down (thankfully I also have a hardware ESTOP to kill drive power). The Mach 4 greys out and the cursor is the blue Win 10 waiting circle. This happens repeatably both running Artsoft sample GCode as well as a program I used to machine the spindle housing. The program never recovers and has to be closed with task manager. The Smoothstepper remains waiting for Mach signals and won't reconnect when Mach opens leading to me having to power cycle the machine.

At first I thought that this was due to an underpowered computer. The VersaView 5400 computer that is on the machine runs on a 4 core Intel Atom E3845 chipset @ 1.90GHz. It has 4.0Gb of memory and runs Win 10. This is very much on the bottom edge of the system performance requirements for Mach 4 (especially the memory), but there are posts in MachSupport about people not having issues running mach on much less powerful computers without issues. During loading of Mach 4 the CPU is between 70-80%, at idle it is 30-40%, when loading a Gcode program 70-80% and while running the machine it holds quite steady at the mid 60's%. The memory utilization never got above 2.0Gb (50%). This all seems like the computer was doing just fine, but I was convinced that this computer just didn't have the guts to run Mach 4.

To test the situation, I installed the same version of Mach 4 and ESS utilities onto my laptop (Intel i7 6700HQ 3.5GHz, 32Gb of memory, Win 10). I copied the configuration file from the CNC computer to my laptop and connected to the smoothstepper without issues. I ran the same test files and sure enough, Mach 4 crashed about 5 minutes into the code same as the other computer. I tried this several more times and had the same results. I then tried running the machine from Mach 3 on my laptop and it finished the 2 hour and 20 minute program with no issue whatsoever.

I am posting some questions about this on the Mach support forum, but if anyone here has experience with Mach 4 I'd appreciate any input. My next test will be to install Mach 3 on the VersaView computer and try running the machine that way. I know that the programs are very different, but if the computer fails to work with Mach 3 then I would believe it to be underpowered.

Here are some Mach 4 screenshots. Not super interesting, but hey, it's all I have.

287438

287439

287440

287441

287442

287443

Pink wanted to know why I was in the shop rather than in bed with the electric blanket!

287444

Zoey needed to investigate as well.

287445
 
Last edited:

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
So I was able to confirm that the crashing program is just what it looks like when the demo times out.

I do appreciate how friendly this forum is. I got a nasty comment on another forum that I was complaining about the demo software without being a paying customer (yet) when I was just trying to understand a small issue I was having. I haven't had a single unfriendly interaction on this site and I really appreciate that!

Update coming soon.
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Thanks Jim!

Since it seems like Mach 4 is up and running, I am switching gears back to the hardware side of this build.

First off, I got the matching buttons for my operator button station. I have labels for each of these. They are the Allen Bradley 800FP series of operators (22mm). The plastic ones, while plenty sturdy, feel a little cheap. There are metal versions of these but I couldn't find any cheaply on ebay. The back side of the button is modular to select which contacts you want as well as lamps if the button is illuminated. Top hole is for an ESTOP which is temporarily setup elsewhere.

Edit: I guess cheap feeling is relative. They are super nice compared to most operators you get from automation direct or hobby grade stuff, but are a long shot from the mil-spec buttons and knobs I work with day to day.

287577

Thanks to the folding mount, the computer tucks neatly behind the machine for cleaning. The mount is already getting bent, so I am looking for something a little more sturdy.

287578

Loosening 4 bolts removes the top bearing plate from the Z axis.

287579

From there the 50lb gas strut can be disconnected.

287580

The gib can be knocked loose. Note that all sides are flat (no milled pockets). The way facing side is ground and flaked, the opposite side is just ground. The spare gib just looks rough machined, not ground or flaked. That being said these things bend like a noodle so I'm not sure how much value comes from grinding.

287581

And the Z axis slide completely removed.

287582

The way cover is completely shot and I got a replacement from Grizzly for $22.

287583

I used some Dykem Hi-Spot blue to see how bad the gib was (hint: terrible). I don't have a great way to spread the ink so I use a tightly balled paper towel. I feel like half the ink sticks to the towel, but a tube is cheap.

287584

I covered the edge which was rubbing on the flat way with steel blue and ground it on my bench grinder until the ink was cleaned up. I was fairly conservative with material removal so I may need to take a few more passes later on. Dummy here didn't cover the surface plate with a sheet so all the exhaust and grinding dust landed on the Hi-spot blue and stuck. I can be a little dense sometimes. I will completely cover the plate in the future.

287586

The first spotting of the gib shows very little contact. I was able to bend it a little straighter by hand and get better contact along the length. I ground the end of a file with a slight rake and a wide radius and used it as a make shift scraper. I'm sure it doesn't work anywhere near as well as a real one, but I'm able to remove a touch of material. I'm not trying to scrape this into perfection (nor am I really sure how), but I'd like to get a touch more contact than it has. This is my first attempt at any kind of scraping.

Question: I've seen Sandvik, Biax, and Anderson scrapers for sale but they are large and fairly expensive. Are there any smaller sub-$100 scrapers for things like gibs and touchups that you could recommend. Maybe one day I'll take the leap and get all the scraping essentials, but for now having something to do some touchup would be great.

After a little file scraping and stoning I am getting better contact (not shown by the blue currently, I already wiped half of it off). This is the replacement Z axis gib. Note that it comes in very long and is a cut-to-length kind of deal.
287587
 
Last edited:

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Only spent an hour last night on the gib and Z axis slide.

An initial (and excessively heavy) bluing of the slide shows the contact. Its honestly not terrible, but the heavy blue was hiding some very tall high spots.

287656

After 5 to 6 cycles of scraping. Removing material with a file/scraper is really slow going. I'm going to do just a touch more and call it good. I can revisit later if I want to actually learn to scrape. I would rather not ruin this due to lack of knowledge.

287657
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
I spent one more hour doing a touch up job of scraping on the Z Axis slide. It obviously isn't perfect, but it is better than when I started. If I decide to take the leap into actual scraping, I will come back to this project. At the the contact points extend to nearly the full length of the slide now.

First pass:

287719

Halfway Through:

287717

After last pass:

287718

I also went to refit the gib into the way but found that even a little work removing high spots caused the gib to seat much lower in the way, beyond the range of the adjustment screws. I had purchased a spare gib from Grizzly but there is a section right in the middle of the way side of the gib that was dished out during machining and never got touched by the grinder. I'm going to call and see if I can get a replacement...

287720

For the time being, I reinstalled the Z axis slide using some shim stock behind the gib. I got this part done and then had to go back because I forgot the 3 bolts to mount the spindle. Later I found I also forgot the new way cover so I have to disassemble again. Ugh.

287721

Fit of the gib is MUCH better after grinding it. That gap is smaller than it looks in the picture. Maybe somewhere between .030 and .060. My way oil actually sticks on the ways now which is nice.

287722

Next up is the Z axis servo mount. It is a roughly 3.5" cube that was machined from billet maybe 75% on the lathe and 25% on the CNC.

287723

Original billet made 3 mounts plus some leftover. 4x4x18" 6061. Parted off on the lathe.

287728

287724

Mounted to the Z axis bearing plate.

287725

The servo mounts to the shaft with a zero backlash jaw coupling. These run pretty smooth at high speeds compared to some other types.

287726

And the beauty shot with the servo attached. Cables route down the back of the column. It is a little tall but no issue. I'm hopeful that the direct drive makes the servo setup more reliable and easier to tune.

287727

I still have to go back and put the way cover on, add the cable chain for the spindle, and shim the gib a little more. I also want a new monitor mount.
 

ConValSam

----
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
86
More 5 star work: looking great.

Did the Z axis feel smoother after your scraping efforts?
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Thanks! The biggest thing that I notice between grinding the gib, and scraping the gib and slide is that everything fits better together. The gib seats firmly and I can still slide the axis with moderate ease even though it is a lot tighter. The motion feels more fluid without feeling like parts are scraping together. The oil actually stays on the way where before it would run between the ways and the slide and just fall off the column.

I would say it was worthwhile, but I certainly didn't do a full scraping job where the parts ride on an oil film.
 

Fang

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
3
I wonder what is the total price of this CNC AC servo rebuild?
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Fang, much of what I have built has been acquired from various places and not purchased new. If everything was bought new, this panel would be prohibitively expensive. I have been very fortunate to be able to use some extra parts from work (with permission of course).

I'm sure I've forgotten lots of things but here is a ballpark of parts that I needed to buy:
  • Enclosure (24x36x8) - $100
  • Automation Direct (solenoid, M12 ports, disconnect, misc. components) - $200-250
  • ebay odds and ends (voltage converter boards, pushbuttons, RS485 converter, monitor mounts etc.) - $400 (This is a huge guess)
  • Missing cables for servos: $400
  • Raw Aluminum Stock for motor mounts: $120
  • SDP-SI (pulleys and belts, including scrap): $150
  • Assorted McMaster Carr (bolts, gaskets, etc.): $300
  • Replacement bearings, VXB: $120
  • MPG, ebay: $50
  • Mach 4: $200
  • 2 years of having fun building this: Priceless :)
Honestly I keep the monthly shop purchases within budget and I try not to stress over the cost of an individual project. I think of my shop like a monthly "fun" membership. I certainly could be doing much worse things with my money.

In addition, I was able to use the Smoothstepper from the previous version of this build (came in around $1200 for the panel and electronics if I remember). I have more than paid off the machine + CNC conversion with customer projects, and I intend to do that again. I love doing customer projects, especially when I get to be invested in the creation and design of their ideas. I just never want the hobby to feel like a job, so I am selective on what kinds of work I am willing to do.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,033
Fang, much of what I have built has been acquired from various places and not purchased new. If everything was bought new, this panel would be prohibitively expensive. I have been very fortunate to be able to use some extra parts from work (with permission of course).

I'm sure I've forgotten lots of things but here is a ballpark of parts that I needed to buy:
  • Enclosure (24x36x8) - $100
  • Automation Direct (solenoid, M12 ports, disconnect, misc. components) - $200-250
  • ebay odds and ends (voltage converter boards, pushbuttons, RS485 converter, monitor mounts etc.) - $400 (This is a huge guess)
  • Missing cables for servos: $400
  • Raw Aluminum Stock for motor mounts: $120
  • SDP-SI (pulleys and belts, including scrap): $150
  • Assorted McMaster Carr (bolts, gaskets, etc.): $300
  • Replacement bearings, VXB: $120
  • MPG, ebay: $50
  • Mach 4: $200
  • 2 years of having fun building this: Priceless :)
Honestly I keep the monthly shop purchases within budget and I try not to stress over the cost of an individual project. I think of my shop like a monthly "fun" membership. I certainly could be doing much worse things with my money.

In addition, I was able to use the Smoothstepper from the previous version of this build (came in around $1200 for the panel and electronics if I remember). I have more than paid off the machine + CNC conversion with customer projects, and I intend to do that again. I love doing customer projects, especially when I get to be invested in the creation and design of their ideas. I just never want the hobby to feel like a job, so I am selective on what kinds of work I am willing to do.
I wonder if anyone has posted a "total" for a conversion for a G0704 machine from scratch (or others)? I subscribe to Home Shop Machinist and was sent a complementary copy of Digital Machinist. I haven't priced it on his web site, but there's an ad in there for www.cnc-minimill.com that sounds decent. It's a conversion kit for the G8689, HF 44991, Little Machine Shop #3960, MicroLux# 84630 and others.

I'm still deciding on my upgrade for a Series 1 BP with a 1983 Anilam 2-axis. Leaning now toward a Centroid Acorn controller ($300) which will also need a Windows 10 touchscreen computer (~$400). I'm going with either ClearPath or DMM 750W servos. DMM has a running ad on eBay for 3 750W plus power supply and drivers for $1150. I already have the ball screws on the table, but need to either drive the knee or convert the quill. I figure I'll have at least $3000 into the conversion.

Bruce
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
I can go back to mine and look at the initial conversion costs. Servos add a fair deal of expense to the project but your budget doesn't sound too far off. That would be a very nice machine!
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
OK. Been a little while since an update so here is where we are. I've spent probably a dozen hours over the last week working on an AutoCAD Electrical set of drawings for the control panel. I originally hand drew these, but so much has changed in the panel since those were done that I needed to make a new set. They still need a lot of work, but have most of the information I need to troubleshoot the system right now.

I disassembled the Z axis again to fit the way cover. I returned the new gibs that I received defective for replacement, so I'm stuck with what is on the machine right now.
288446

I ran into a serious issue where my Ethernet Smoothstepper lost its configuration and wouldn't respond to mach. I wasted a number of days on this but after a support call with Warp 9 Technology, it was resolved. They couldn't identify why the board lost its IP address, but the utility to reprogram it was being blocked by the windows firewall. The support from those guys is top notch.

I started to run the Z axis servo, first using Ultraware (Allen Bradley Servo Utility) and then Mach 4 once the ESS was up and running again. This thing is a beast!. I ran it slowly for a long time, but finally cranked it up to 1000ipm (5000rpm). It is loud, but the sound is normal for a ballnut with a return channel. That is about 95% of the noise. I have a few videos I will attempt to post below.

I also got a new monitor mount in. UPS may have played soccer with the box because this is how I found it:
288447

The new mount is super heavy duty. It is rated for 70lbs but only cost $20 (plus it came with a pretty nice HDMI cable). Here it is next to the old mount.

288448

The extra extension length of the mount gives me some flexibility in where the computer can be positioned and tilted.

288449

And it has some nice cable routing provisions.

288450

I will try to add videos below. Next step is teardown and assembly of the X and Y axis servos.
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
Ultraware indexing again at 1000ipm. This is the top rapid I could possibly get on this machine with this setup. I doubt I'll run it flat out like this very often. No real reason to.

View attachment IMG_4129.MOV
 

macardoso

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
303
This was the first real test running the motor from Mach 4. There is no discernible difference between the command coming from serial (Ultraware) and Step/Dir (Mach 4). I'm very pleased.

View attachment IMG_4139.MOV
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top