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Grinder accident

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SE18

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#1
I was using my angle grinder to remove a weld. I was wearing wrap-around goggles from Harbor Freight that I thought would prevent sparks from reaching inside (the wrap arounds touch skin on all sides). But a spark somehow got inside, landing on my new expensive glasses made of plastic and melted a spot on the plastic. I'm going to see if the spot can be buffed out.
 

Bob Korves

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#2
Unfortunately, I doubt if the spot can be dressed out, actually, I think you will find them not interested in doing it even if it is possible. They will try to sell you a new lens. Another good reason (beyond the desire to keep on seeing) to wear double eye protection with tools like angle grinders, cut off tools, Dremel type tools, bench grinders, snag grinders, and similar tools.
 

4ssss

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#3
There are certain things from HF that you don't buy, and that is anything that you think you'll need for more than 1 time before throwing away. I'm glad you're OK, but I hope you learned something.
 

MikeInOr

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#4
Not only would they have to buff out the melted spot but they would also have to strip and reapply any coating you paid to put on the lens. Then that spot on the lense and around it isn't going to be focused properly for your prescription leaving a fuzzy spot in your vision. I think you are best off getting a replacement lens.

I recently broke an arm off my expensive glasses when I hit myself in the head with a 2x4. Local optic shop wanted $200 to replace the broken arm on the glasses. I found the manufacture and model number of the frames on the broken arm and ordered an entirely new identical frame from EZContacts for $70 with free shipping. A bit of youtubing gives me confidence that I can swap the lenses to the new frames myself. I know I paid over $200 for the frames from the local optical store when I bought them.

So how did a spark get around your eye protection onto your everyday glasses? You aren't supposed to take a shower in the sparks when you are grinding! :cool:

Good job on using both safety glasses and your every day glasses. Eye surgery and the possible loss of sight makes having to buy a new lens seem pretty inconsequential!
 

Tozguy

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#5
How new are they? Sometimes there is a chance that they might replace the lens at a discount.
 

Z2V

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#7
It’s good that you had the goggles on or that spark might have got past your glasses and into your eye.

Oh, MikeInOR, don’t bother telling us why you hit yourself in the head with a 2x4
 

Z2V

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#9
^^^ ACHiPro, I have that shield as well. Best I’ve ever used for the price, very well made.
 

cg285

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#10
I was using my angle grinder to remove a weld. I was wearing wrap-around goggles from Harbor Freight that I thought would prevent sparks from reaching inside (the wrap arounds touch skin on all sides). But a spark somehow got inside, landing on my new expensive glasses made of plastic and melted a spot on the plastic. I'm going to see if the spot can be buffed out.
never gets on my glasses. always goes straight for the eyeball
 

MikeInOr

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#11
Oh, MikeInOR, don’t bother telling us why you hit yourself in the head with a 2x4
Because it was there!!!! :bipolar: DUH!!!!

Working too late assembling a frame to lift my new to me lathe out of my trailer... one of the braces slipped while I was trying to get the screw gun on it... had just enough momentum to knock some sense into me and break my glasses. I took a shower and went to bed after that instead of finishing up and trying to move the lathe when I was too tired.
 

Dredb

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#12
Same thing happened to me a few years ago, a spark found it's way through a very small ventilation hole in the (soft) frame of the goggles and raised a blister on the edge of my eyelid. Could have been worse!
Personal protective equipment may limit the severity of an injury but it's best not to make assumptions, think about what you are doing and if further precautions may be needed.
 

middle.road

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#13
I had my 'close up' glasses on a granny strap when I went and used the angle grinder. Forgot they were around my neck.
I've even got a special hook on the big tool box to hang them so that they wouldn't get dinged up. *Memory Loss*
Ruined them.
Luckily there's a discount eyeglass shop here in Knoxville. Under $60 for a new pair.
The ones I ruined were $230.
 

westerner

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#15
Many in this field consider a mini-grinder THE single most dangerous tool in the shop. I will wear that reminder forever on my wrist. Wire wheel, insufficient attention. Wheel caught an edge, jumped out of my SINGLE hand holding the grinder. At full speed, the wheel caught my other wrist and launched the grinder across the shop. The wound was raggedly spectacular. About 9 things done wrong. Cheap lesson, never to be forgotten
 

whitmore

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#16
I was using my angle grinder to remove a weld. I was wearing wrap-around goggles ... But a spark somehow got inside.
My hand grinders turn the same way (counterclockwise looking into the working end) as a drill. But,
when you need to watch what you're grinding, and apply pressure while holding the grinder
in your right hand, that sends sparks right toward my face. Other than converting to left-hand
work, or doing an awkward backhander grip, there's just no way to get around having a sparks
versus faceshield exercise.

So, does anyone make a hand grinder that is ergonomically correct for right-handed
users? With clockwise rotation? A memorable feature is that the wheel would
be retained with a lefthand fastener.
 

pstemari

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#17
Not sure I follow that. The guard should keep sparks away from you.

If you're holding the grinder body in your right hand and the side handle in your left, using the edge away from you, the sparks should be going to the side, not back at you.

If the body of the grinder is at 6 o'clock, the side handle is at 9 o'clock, the guard is going from maybe 4 o'clock to 10 o'clock, and the cutting action is around 1 to 2 o'clock.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

Tozguy

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#20
My goggles have indirect vents and have done the job for a good while now. As you can see the grit gets everywhere, even in the joint between lens and frame.

When I am grinding I am focused on the job and not so much on which direction the sparks are flying. I prefer googles to a full face mask most of the time. I am still looking for better goggles that are idiot proof. Price is no object.
 

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SE18

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#21
I have one more experience to share while on topic of grinders. I was doing some grinding (I forget it it was bench or angle grinder it happened so long ago) on a cold winter nite in my garage wearing a thick shirt. Lots of sparks. Suddenly, I started to feel nice and warm and comfortable. Then a bit hot. I looked down and my shirt was on fire. Burned a nice 5" diameter hole, no injury. I still have the evidence.
 

Silverbullet

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#22
It seems no what I've ever tried the sparks , slag, all of it bounces around till it gets in . My three hundred dollar welding Helmut YUPP you should see my glasses and I buy glass lens at least some only leave tiny spots. Even grinding I use a full face shield and goggles. They are sly invaders , take a look at my socks and feet. I've even been on fire from the crap. I just thank god I've never had a bad one in my eyes.
 

SE18

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#23
Silver bullet: I think the fluid in the eye would extinguish a spark pretty quick, but I'm no doctor. I thought I was the only one with spark problems but I see there are others. I bought my glasses a month ago and the spot is in left lens. My right eye has floaters (a problem some of you over 60 might experience), so I'm used to seeing spots. I'll just soldier on with the glasses and supplement full face shield with goggles. Problem is, it's uncomfortable and harder to see with multiple layers of eye protection. One operation where I do use multiple protection is with my table saw. I had some nasty kickbacks with it in the past.
 
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