• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE SUPPORT OUR FORUM - UPGRADE YOUR ACCOUNT HERE!
[4]

Grizzly G4016 - The upgrades begin...

January Project of the Month [3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#1
After looking at lots of used lathes online, I came across a one-owner 2001 G4016 just 8 miles away. Super-low hours; there appears to be far more dust than rust or wear. $2600 was more than I wanted to pay, but there's no shipping or sales tax, plus I can have it now... ;)
G4016.jpg

I have a number of light projects of my own, but plan to offer local lathe services as a hobby/money-maker (I'm retired). DRO and a good QCTP setup are at the top of the list once I get through cleaning the machine and checking the setup. What worthwhile improvements/upgrades have other owners installed?
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#3
Only the Grizzly-supplied generic standard parts: 6" 3-jaw, 8" 4-jaw, 12" plate, travel rest, 4-position non-QC tool post, 1/2" x MT3 drill chuck, HSS and carbide MT3 dead centers, MT3 live center, MT3 to MT5 sleeve. There should be a travel rest, too - I'll find out when I pick it up tomorrow. It hasn't been used much in the last few years. It was purchased in 2001, but the owners manual and record were lost in a house fire. The manual I downloaded is a 2005 version, so I'm not 100% sure of what should be there. I ran it yesterday, and all speeds and feeds seemed very smooth in both directions.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,992
Likes
5,329
#4
Good to hear you are getting all the factory accessories. They are expensive to add on to the cost of the lathe, and I did not see them in the photo. $2600 is a fair price with all the accessories and in that good of condition.
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#5
In the end, I didn't get the drill chuck, MT5 to MT3 sleeve, or live center, but I'm OK with that. Cleaned up the machine, dismantled/cleaned/adjusted the gibs on the cross and compound slides and cleaned the 3-jaw chuck and ways. Chucked up a previously-machined piece, and it all seems to run pretty darn true. Need to get an indicator on it.

What are the general sentiments on buying the basics to get going: QCTP and holders, boring bar, cutting tools, machinists level, ID snap gauges, indicator and base, drill chuck, live center, DRO system (maybe). It would be nice to do it all in one-stop shopping. Just looking for home shop quality... CDCO? McMaster? Grainger? Other?

Thanks again for the welcome.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,992
Likes
5,329
#6
In the end, I didn't get the drill chuck, MT5 to MT3 sleeve, or live center, but I'm OK with that.
Those are the lower dollar items. They are also the ones you really would like to be accurate, and the ones that come with the machines are often lacking in accuracy. Find some decent ones. The faceplate, chucks, and steady and follower rests are the high dollar accessories that should come with the lathe. Accuracy means little with those items, aside from the 3 jaw chuck, which is what it is. You will need to test the chucks to see what you have there.
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#7
Initially, the 3-jaw looks reasonably true. In the process of cleaning the machine, I've discovered that it's really low on oil, so I won't run it again until I get it topped up. As far as the accessory purchases go, I'll have to keep doing some research. What seems obvious to me is that machine setup can be far important than the brand of parts...
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,992
Likes
5,329
#8
Keep in mind that you only need to be really accurate on jobs that really need to be accurate. There is always an acceptable tolerance and it should always be considered. Just about all of us in this hobby tend to value accuracy more than is really necessary for nearly all the work that we actually do. That does not really cause problems beyond wasted time and wasted money spent on producing more accuracy than we need. The other issue is that no matter what the accuracy capability of the machine or tooling is, the work will still only be as accurate as the nut behind the wheels who is doing the work... Very fine and accurate work can be and is done on poor machines by talented machinists. Poor work is often made by poor or lazy machinists using highly accurate tools. Try to keep a realistic balance even when there is heavy pressure to get the shiniest and most expensive stuff.
 
Last edited:

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#9
In other words, keep my OCD under control... I get it completely. I spent 30 years in auto racing, the first 10 in hands-on roles. I learned not to chase tolerances when unnecessary from some very talented veterans. I also learned that microns matter in some cases. Nothing I'll be doing will need uber tolerances; I would have picked a different machine in that case. I just want to make sure that I've handled the basics, and don't want to introduce any unnecessary variables into the equation. Chasing tolerances is a classic exercise in the law of diminishing returns on $$$. "Nice" stuff will be fine.
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#10
Ordered a live center, keyless chuck with integral MT3 shank, BXA toolpost set, 1/2" tool bits & holders and a few other goodies from from CDCO. Feedback on their stuff seemed pretty favorable... I also ordered a Ditron DRO60-3V from Toolmann; he had a special on 3-axis displays for $20 less than the 2-axis display, so I'll be all set if I add a scale to the tailstock or buy a mill.

The seller also called to say that he had found the live center, drill chuck and MT5/MT3 spindle sleeve!

First project refurbishing some billet pulleys came out great:
IMG_4743.jpg
Pulleys_20171214.JPG
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
3,091
Likes
1,456
#12
Nice set up , looks like it operates quite well . Good job on the pulleys . What do you think of the tool post you bought ? Looks good in the picture. I have an old model from enco that's a weird set up it works but the holders are almost nonexistent. I guess really now I've finally got a mill I can make some. If I ever get out of pain.
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#13
Thanks, Silverbullet. I'm still working on adjusting all the play out of things; gibs, backlash, etc., so I haven't tried any heavy cuts yet. I bought the CDCO toolpost (actually a Bostar) based on the review at the top of the "Machine Accessories" forum. The post and holders all look very nice, but I haven't machined the base to fit my compound slide yet. The pulleys looked even better after a trip through my powder coating oven:
PulleyWP_20171218.JPG
I've also started truing up some vintage go-kart wheels, but need to sort out a chatter/harmonic issue. Maybe my new toolpost and (sharp) cutting tools will solve that:
IMG_4758.JPG
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
3,091
Likes
1,456
#14
Hard to tell with chatter,, Gibbs and flex in smaller lathes at times make it tough to do. Bigger chuck jaws might help to stop the singing too.
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#16
CDCO/Bostar toolpost and holders work great. Just ordered 3 more 250-201 holders to mount all my tools. Re-installed to tool tray made by the previous owner, but in a different position; may have to cut it down a bit. Overall, very happy with the lathe and getting comfortable with it. 18F3C022-4135-4DC9-8782-A06C11E4C929.jpeg 18F3C022-4135-4DC9-8782-A06C11E4C929.jpeg
 

Splat

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2012
Messages
1,067
Likes
125
#17
I've good and bad, mainly bad honestly, about CDCO's stuff. I would go with a Phase II+ qctp set. You can catch them on sale at MSC or other places sometimes. I think a Machtach is a worthy little $50 investment. It'll let you know your spindle speed or SFM as well as how steady your motor is holding. Other than that....I saw for the important things like measuring tools to buy once, cry once. IOW, don't buy junk, or used but that's IMO. Good luck with the machine and welcome to the site!
 

C_Spray

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
11
Likes
16
#18
So far, I've got no complaints about the CDCO stuff for the light work that I've been doing. Tackling a piece of 304 stainless has raised a number of issues regarding the rigidity and freeplay in the lathe, however. Cutoff work seems especially scary, so I'm embarking on a thorough investigation of gibs and ways. I think that I've successfully honed and adjusted the compound and cross-slide gibs; now I have to look at the carriage.

Keeping a close eye on Craigslist, ebay, Facebook Marketplace and BidSpotter!
 

MSD0

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Messages
244
Likes
66
#19
So far, I've got no complaints about the CDCO stuff for the light work that I've been doing. Tackling a piece of 304 stainless has raised a number of issues regarding the rigidity and freeplay in the lathe, however. Cutoff work seems especially scary, so I'm embarking on a thorough investigation of gibs and ways. I think that I've successfully honed and adjusted the compound and cross-slide gibs; now I have to look at the carriage.

Keeping a close eye on Craigslist, ebay, Facebook Marketplace and BidSpotter!
By eliminating the compound, a solid tool post made a huge difference in terms of rigidity on my lathe.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top