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[4]

I Bought An Antique Bead Roller. Need help :-)

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Susan_in_SF

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#1
Hi guys,
I swear, I am going to stop buying stuff. I just keep running into awesome finds that I can't say no to. A guy was selling antique tools that his great grandpa used. I picked up a Miller Falls bench mount crank drill press and a bead roller for $110 total. I don’t know if the bead roller was a deal or not. I am not even sure if I will ever use it. It is mising the parts that clamps to the table. I will post a pic of the same item that is on the drill. The guy told be that there is a lever on it that will allow me to bend metal to 90 degrees. With this bead roller, can any of you guys tell me if I can get different dies for me this? Do you think I could actually use this roller, or is it obsolete? Also, what the correct name is for the missing clamp is called? I am attaching a pic of the one on the drill so you know exactly what I am referring to.
Thanks for your awesome info.
Susan 20180417_192847.jpg 20180407_185631.jpg 20180407_184559.jpg 20180407_183328.jpg 20180407_183317.jpg 20180407_181253.jpg 20180407_181217.jpg
 

Eddyde

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#2
It kooks like it might still work, does it turn? I'd clean the rust off, open it up and grease the gears. Dies look like they could be made pretty easily on a lathe.
 

extropic

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#3
A bead roller is a very simple machine and the hand crank models on the market today , probably, aren't any more sophisticated than yours.
It looks pretty rusty in the pictures but, if the innards are not ruined, it's salvageable.
I would call the missing part the clamp screw. Easy enough to make or buy what you need, assuming that the thread is one that we would consider a "standard". The first step is to determine the thread form (60ºV, Acme, other???) major diameter and pitch.
Bead rollers are not obsolete and dies are available. I don't know if available dies will fit your machine.
Do you plan to de-rust and disassemble things for inspection/refurbishment?
Take care with the nuts and bolts because fastener standards (diameter & pitch) may have changed since those were manufactured. I suggest you check each removed fastener for diameter and pitch and compare to a list of current UN threads.

The dies will imprint any surface texture (rust pits?) into your work piece so you may want to polish those up a bit after rust removal.
 

Tinkertoy1941

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#4
Rolls of any shape can be made!! But the machines were not made to standard sizes, so the new items must be fit to each machine!!
1524248683586.png
I have learned this lesson the hard way. The next issue is material specification needed for clearance issues.
It looks like your machine with a little work would be just fine
 

chips&more

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#5
Maybe not in the prettiest condition, but with some elbow grease, you could have a keeper. Just the base alone on fleabay can fetch +30 bucks. Pexto made a lot of those rollers. Looks like it could use a good soaking. Take it apart. Then maybe glass bead some of it? You’re almost done…Dave
 

Susan_in_SF

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#6
A bead roller is a very simple machine and the hand crank models on the market today , probably, aren't any more sophisticated than yours.
It looks pretty rusty in the pictures but, if the innards are not ruined, it's salvageable.
I would call the missing part the clamp screw. Easy enough to make or buy what you need, assuming that the thread is one that we would consider a "standard". The first step is to determine the thread form (60ºV, Acme, other???) major diameter and pitch.
Bead rollers are not obsolete and dies are available. I don't know if available dies will fit your machine.
Do you plan to de-rust and disassemble things for inspection/refurbishment?
Take care with the nuts and bolts because fastener standards (diameter & pitch) may have changed since those were manufactured. I suggest you check each removed fastener for diameter and pitch and compare to a list of current UN threads.

The dies will imprint any surface texture (rust pits?) into your work piece so you may want to polish those up a bit after rust removal.
Yes, I do plan on eventually taking this roller apart to de-rust and clean. Thanks for the tidbit of polishng the die :)
 

Susan_in_SF

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#7
It kooks like it might still work, does it turn? I'd clean the rust off, open it up and grease the gears. Dies look like they could be made pretty easily on a lathe.
Yes, they turn. I will checkout if I can make a die off the lathe. Thanks!
 

Susan_in_SF

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#8
Maybe not in the prettiest condition, but with some elbow grease, you could have a keeper. Just the base alone on fleabay can fetch +30 bucks. Pexto made a lot of those rollers. Looks like it could use a good soaking. Take it apart. Then maybe glass bead some of it? You’re almost done…Dave
Thanks Dave
 

Brian Hutchings

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#9
It also appears to have a stop to ensure that the swage is a measurable distance from the edge of the metal. Well done on the find, is there any makers name on it?
Brian
 

cvairwerks

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#10
A complete Pexto unit with one set of rolls will average in the 300-400$ range or higher depending on where you are located. If it’s a Pexto unit, parts should be still available.
 

NortonDommi

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#12
I reckon you got a good score on those two. What great projects. Not much throat on the roller might have been used more for edge setting work or ducting.
Dies are easy to make on a lathe. For upsetting flanges you need a flat die and one that has a profile like a dovetail cutter.
 
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