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Joining the club, 1440G9 Lathe

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Brucepts

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#1
Picked up a Central Machinery 1440G9 lathe this weekend. Circa 1998

Started cleaning it up and getting it ready for service . . . I added the 6-jaw chuck, had it sitting around for years didn't fit my old 19x48" Hendey Cone Head. Glad I kept it around and didn't sell it!

Came with a 6" 3 jaw, 10" 4 jaw, face plate, steady and follower rests. Will probably modify the stand sometime not to keen on the 3 legged setup. Would like to add a taper attachment (not a priority) and a 5C Lever Collet Chuck if I can find something from another model 1440 that could be modified.

Anybody else have this model?


CM 1440G9.jpg
 

richl

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#2
You will probably find that many of the Chinese lathes in that era are made in the same factory. See if on the name plate or somewhere on it is the country of origin. It could be Taiwan, a number of them were. I have an enco lathe circa 2000 lathat looks similar but with a norton box.

Fun lathe, definitely get it on a proper stand, they do tend to get vibrations from the motor.

Good luck
 

Brucepts

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#3
Made in Taiwan, Chiu Ting Machinery Co. Ltd Inspect Date: 1998
 

middle.road

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#4
From here it's looks very similar to my '98 Birmingham, especially the carriage.
The gear levers on the head stock are in different positions though.
Switch panel is the same.
 

Brucepts

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From here it's looks very similar to my '98 Birmingham, especially the carriage.
The gear levers on the head stock are in different positions though.
Switch panel is the same.
Any pictures of your lathe?
 

middle.road

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#6
Right after I got it out of storage that I had it sitting in for several months after purchase.
Gotta love how it is labeled 'Hight' for High Gear.
I replaced the Power Switch and Emergency Stop with Allen-Bradley switches.
P1040330.JPG P1040331.JPG P1040329.JPG
 
D

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#7
That’s a lotta lathe on a 3 legged table... doesn’t look heavy duty enough.
 

Brucepts

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That’s a lotta lathe on a 3 legged table... doesn’t look heavy duty enough.
It's in my plans to add some additional supports, musta worked ok for the previous owner though. I'm going to keep the shelf space and I have some drawers I think will add.
 

The_Apprentice

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I was going to add, the first thing that scared me was seeing this sitting on a 3-legged support.... really worries me a lot. I know the head part is the most heaviest- but still....
 
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#10
Doesn't look like it would take much to lay it down, huh? Lol.
If it were my lathe and my luck I'd fall into it somehow, it would teeter to the rear then swing back and fall forward doing something like crushing my legs or something else terrible. Haha.
 

The_Apprentice

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#11
If it were my lathe and my luck I'd fall into it somehow,
Probably by having that tiny piece of emory cloth grab ahold of your fingers a little too quick, followed by getting your arm wrapped around the chuck, and during the fight of man vs machine... the entire lathe tips and falls on you while trying to get away- just to add more insult to your injuries.
 
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#12
hahaha. if youre using emery cloth like this, then youre doing it wrong.
rope.jpg
 

The_Apprentice

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#13
Sadly, I've been forced to watch 50 Shades & Darker... but no, I've never understood THAT kind of emery cloth bondage... Not that I have anything against BDSM. Whatever floats someone's boat I suppose :p

On a vanilla tone of things, I am thinking on buying a benchtop buffer machine, as I really want to minimize danger polishing/buffing directly on a rotating lathe. Honestly, one little catch of cloth is all it takes to cause a big accident, especially at the speeds I see people trying these operations on.
 
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#14
To derail your polishing machine plan, I've done more potential dammage to myself on polishing machines than the lathe.
I used to work for a small company who repaired surgical instruments. After repairing a towel clamp
clamp.jpg

yes, those points are as sharp as they look.
i was trying to touch up the brushed look in the throat on a cloth abrasive wheel. i leaned over to get eye level with the wheel to just to touch the wheel precisely. i had a weird feeling, stood up, went and got my safety glasses. came back, repositioned myself and the second i touched the clamp to the wheel one of the points grabbed the side of the cloth wheel, ripped it from my hands, did a 360 around the wheel and ejected it directly into my glasses. lol. left a sizable dent/chip in my glasses. terrified, i sat back down at my bench and took a breather for a moment. that funny feeling i got? who the heck knows... but it definitely saved my right eye, no question. haha
the grinders were mounted infront of vacuum hoods. i dont know how many instruments i lose down the blower chute because the wheel took it from my hands.
we used a lot of silicon carbide wheels cause the clamps of needle holders are carbide inserts.
premier-mayo-hegar-needle-holder-tungsten-carbide-insert-9085151.jpg tungsten-carbide-inserts-for-needle-holders-tips.jpg

we always did a ring test, but when youre going through a 5/8" wheel a week, your odds of having a fly apart are high. we had common practice to stand to the side and start the wheel and walk away for 5 minutes. every so often, BAAAM, clang, clunk, doink. a chunk of a wheel would come walking, bouncing, out of the grinding room across the shop floor.


sorry for the thread hijack, bruce.
 
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