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vimes1984

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#1
Hello everyone,
I have just purchased and my brand new to me mini lathe has arrived, it has come with a selection of tools, of which I know nothing.
I've tried reading up a little about it but I'm still lost regarding which tool is used for what.
I'm attaching an image with all of the tools laid out separated by left and right with a few in the middle I'm not sure about...

Could someone tell me which tool is for what?
IMG_20181008_145849.jpg
 

francist

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#2
Capture mini lathe tool set.JPG
 

vimes1984

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#3
thanks that did help I ended up figureing out some where marked and googling it :D
 

Janderso

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#4
Just my 2 cents. You may want to learn how to grind quality HSS.
My experience with those type of lathe tools made me look like I had no idea what I was doing. Once I began to understand and practice grinding my own HSS tooling, I have had much better results in finish quality.
IMHO of course.
 

vimes1984

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#5
@Janderso I already have my mind on learning that BUT one step at a time :D I litterally just turned my first lathe on less than 48 hr's ago :D
 

ttabbal

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#6
Since you'll need them for HSS anyway, you might try getting a couple diamond hones and use them to sharpen up those brazed carbide tools a bit. Sharper is better for little machines.
 

vimes1984

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#7

Technical Ted

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#9
Download a free copy of South Bend "How to run a lathe". It's geared for older, belt driven lathes, but the basic information in it remains the same regardless of the vintage of machine.

Ted
 

Jimsehr

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#11
Lots of guys buy sets of carbide tools like you have and try to use them right out of the box. When they don’t work worth a darn they blame the tools or carbide. But to get them to work right you need to sharpen them. So you need a grinder with a green grinding wheel to sharpen carbide. And the tools should be set right on centerline.
A diamond hone will help keep them sharp after they have been sharpened.
Try to find a machinist hobby group close to home and see if you can get someone
To help you grind your first few tools.
 

Shootymacshootface

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#12
Just my 2 cents. You may want to learn how to grind quality HSS.
My experience with those type of lathe tools made me look like I had no idea what I was doing. Once I began to understand and practice grinding my own HSS tooling, I have had much better results in finish quality.
IMHO of course.
This has been my experience as well. My problems all but dissapered when I started using hss cutting tools.
 

mikey

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#13
I agree with the HSS tool recommendation but those brazed tools will work until you can gear up for tool grinding. Listen to @ttabbal and the others and sharpen the carbide part with a diamond hone. We cannot see the brazed insert but it should have a relief angle on the sides. That is, the side of the insert will not be vertical; it will have a slight angle to it such that the cutting edge is proud of the area right below it. Maintain that angle when you hone and try to smooth out the side of the insert, then flatten the top. Finally, put a very tiny radius at the nose, following the angle of the insert under the cutting edge. Done this way, a brazed tool will actually cut pretty well.

As @Jimsehr says, a green wheel will allow you to grind it better but you have to know how to do that. Until you do, honing will work pretty good.

Learn about cutting speeds and how to calculate it. You need enough speed for these tools to cut well. Unlike inserted carbide, a sharp brazed tool will take a light cut without issues so your little lathe should work okay with them.
 

NortonDommi

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#14
Hello vimes1984 I would follow the advice of ttabbal and give the tools a lick with a Diamond file. You can't go wrong with an investment in some Diamond files as they come in handy for all sorts of things.
Open Source Machine https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC79QdJW2rayvCzqNq-SAM-g Have a number of old,(and some new), training videos that you may be interested in.
Best thing read a bit,(The Amateurs Lathe by L.H.Sparey is sort of a Bible for some), watch some videos, play and get a feel for your machine. I have to warn you now though that everybody starts to tutu with their stuff after a while and fettling can become addictive.
Most of all just have fun.
 

mikey

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#15
Best thing read a bit,(The Amateurs Lathe by L.H.Sparey is sort of a Bible for some), watch some videos, play and get a feel for your machine.
I agree, great book!

I have to warn you now though that everybody starts to tutu with their stuff after a while and fettling can become addictive.
Tutu?
 

NortonDommi

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#16
Hi Mikey,
Tutu is a Maori slang word for fiddle with, muck around with. "Don't mess with my tutu" was also the title of a great politically incorrect local comedy program and a song. Say "Stop your tutu" to a Kiwi kid and they'll freeze. : )
 

mikey

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#17
Got it, thanks! Learned a new thing today. Tutu in Hawaiian means Grandmother, and we did not mess around with her!
 

NortonDommi

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#18
COPY THAT! I've just learned something new too and that is always good.

Funny how Maori say that their ancestral homeland is 'Hawaiki '. Getting off subject.
 

vimes1984

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#19
I completely missed the last couple of posts to this thread I've been bust futzing around with the new toy :D
 

Ulma Doctor

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#20
brazed carbide and a light duty lathe can be the start of some frustrating machining, and a great learning experience at the same time.
you'll find that most brazed carbide tooling is useless in the state you get them from the tool outlet.

as others have stated, the cutting edge geometry needs to be modified with increased relief angles of the cutting edge to work well with machines lacking in rigidity and/or horsepower

i would strongly suggest listening to Mikey in regards to cutting edge geometry, he understands the subject inside and out .
no disrespect meant to ttabbal ;)
 

vimes1984

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#21
@Janderso And everyone, thank you so much! I've finally ordered some HSS blanks and a grinding wheel :D
and I've been watching a few videos on rake angles and HSS girding in general, I'm going to give it a bash!
Also this hobby is becoming expensive ;) I hope I can make my wife something nice...
 

tmenyc

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#22
This is a great thread: a number of cutting tools and tool holders came with my Logan 820. I don't yet have a bench grinder or a green wheel, but will get one next weekend. What is a good starter set of bits to get? Can you point me to one? The old ones I have are great but they're pretty well ground into strange shapes. I'd like to start easy, then figure out how to sharpen them and go from there.
TIA

Tim
 

tmenyc

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#24
Looks like we're in pretty much the same place ... just getting started. So you're going to grind your own right off the bat? I have quite a few pieces, but think it might be better for me to get a pre-cut set and start there. That's what I'm looking for.
Tim
 

vimes1984

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#25
Yup I'm goning to bite the bullet and just give it a go! :p
 

mikey

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#26
Tim, as I recall, you have a Logan 10x24, right? Nice lathe but a little light and I suspect your top speed is probably less than 1800 rpm. I also recall you will mostly be turning smaller work pieces. Given these conditions - light lathe, low speeds, small work pieces - carbide is not going to be the best tooling choice for you, either brazed or inserted carbide. Yes, it will cut but you are far better off learning to grind and use HSS on that lathe and for your intended purpose.

Another option, especially if you have an aversion to grinding tools for some reason, are the HSS inserted tools from AR Warner. Works just like carbide tools, with similar inserts and geometry. I own them, I like them and they will work well on your lathe and for your purposes. However, a good HSS tool will still outperform them.

My advice is to learn to grind HSS tools. They are the tools your lathe was intended to be used with.
 

tmenyc

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#27
Mikey,
yes, that's the route I'll take, for sure. It makes so much sense, and I do want to learn to grind myself. Buying a bench grinder next weekend. I'll need a green wheel, too, correct?
Also, is there are decent inexpensive starter set of bits you'd recommend? Both to get started with and to show me what the right angles look like?

The advice is appreciated, here and on the other questions.
Tim
 

mikey

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#28
I suggest you do some reading before you buy any equipment. There are a lot of videos on Youtube about tool grinding, too.

I wrote a few things that might help get you started. Read this one and at the end of that first post you will see some links to some other material that will help you to understand tool geometry: https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/how-to-grind-a-hss-turning-tool.52581/

Then have a look at this thread: https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/models-for-grinding-hss-lathe-tools.62111/. We had a huge discussion about tool grinding and stuff. We also made up some model tools that you can look at to see what the tool angles look like. To get a set in your hands, PM @Z2V and he'll hook you up. Do some reading and give it a try. Post questions and pics to that thread and we'll give you a hand. Lot of the guys are quite good at it and can help you fine tune your efforts. I will also help.

You do not need a green wheel unless you intend to grind brazed carbide tooling. If you wish to use a bench grinder for tool grinding, standard AO wheels will work for HSS. Better yet, look into CBN wheels that are specifically made to grind HSS; expensive but a much better option. Then again, you might consider a belt sander for tool grinding; works pretty good.
 

WarrenP

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#29
Also, is there are decent inexpensive starter set of bits you'd recommend? Both to get started with and to show me what the right angles look like?

The advice is appreciated, here and on the other questions.
Tim
Grizzly sells a set of HSS tools already ground for right hand, left hand, etc. I bought those to use and learn about how to grind tools.
 
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