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New here, purchasing a used Mill. HELP!

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GunsOfNavarone

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#1
Hello guys and girls. I'm brand new here and have already found a ton of helpful info here. I need something from y'all...all y'all?? Anyway, what I really need is about 4 of you to come over and help me move this mill I'm buying into my garage, short of that I really need advice.
The mill. It's a circa 1979 JET-16 In literally BRAND NEW condition with after market DRO'S ON X, Y & Z. I'll post pictures...but I know very little in full on mills (I'm comfortable on drill presses. What am I looking for? Worn out what, wobble in what? Etc...
I REALLY APPRECIATE any advice! This is a fine deal as long as he still has it in 3 days when I can show up with a uhaul trailer, I have NO IDEA how I'm physically going to get it home or in my garage!
Thanks!
Sean (GON)
 

ttabbal

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#2
Sounds like a good machine. If the pictures I found on Google were the right model, it looks to be a bench top model. Probably around 500lbs... It shouldn't be too bad to move, particularly with an engine hoist available. Lower it down on a furniture dolly and roll it about. Both from harbor freight for under $150 if you don't have one or someone you can borrow one from.

Another option is to bolt it to a pallet and use a pallet jack.

If it's a ramp trailer, a come along should easily pull it up the ramp.

You've got it easy. Come move my Bridgeport, then we'll talk. :)
 

Z2V

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#3
Hello guys and girls. I'm brand new here and have already found a ton of helpful info here. I need something from y'all...all y'all?? Anyway, what I really need is about 4 of you to come over and help me move this mill I'm buying into my garage, short of that I really need advice.
The mill. It's a circa 1979 JET-16 In literally BRAND NEW condition with after market DRO'S ON X, Y & Z. I'll post pictures...but I know very little in full on mills (I'm comfortable on drill presses. What am I looking for? Worn out what, wobble in what? Etc...
I REALLY APPRECIATE any advice! This is a fine deal as long as he still has it in 3 days when I can show up with a uhaul trailer, I have NO IDEA how I'm physically going to get it home or in my garage!
Thanks!
Sean (GON)

If I looked at the same pics as @ttabbal, it will be heavy but a couple good strong guys should have no trouble moving it. As mentioned an engine hoist and four wheel dolly would be good. Without the engine hoist, 2 oak 4x4’s under the head and two guys to lift and one to steady the load, it will be front heavy, should be able to get it on a dolly. If it has a vise on the table that could come off to reduce weight, heck, you might even remove the table to further reduce the picking weight.
I’d be glad to help if I were in Colorado, I wish I was in Colorado, but I’m not.
Congrats on the find, looking forward to your pics of the move.
Good Luck
 

TerryH

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#4
I just purchased an Enco 105. Similar machine to the Jet. I didn't have anyone to help so I used an engine hoist to lift it off the base, set in trailer and reverse procedure at my house. Worked perfectly. I used lifting straps I bought at Harbor Freight so as not to damage the machine. Tons and tons of information on these machines on the internet/YouTube etc... They are still made virtually unchanged and sold by multiple vendors.
 
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markba633csi

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#5
If you can remove the motor that will save some weight
Good time to invest in an engine hoist
Mark
 

GunsOfNavarone

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#6
Thanks everyone! I really need to know what to look for as far as worn out/damaged parts. What would YOU look for if you were buying a used mill?
P.s. It's 700 lbs. I will buy a shop crane (I have a Grizzly g0602 lathe coming soon as well)
 

markba633csi

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#7
What would I look for? Made in USA about 50 years ago! Seriously, I know that's simply not an option for a lot of us-
I would check the headstock and motor and check for excessive play, runout, noise, etc. in the spindle. Bearings can be expensive. Can the motor be wired for dual voltage? Is it a 3-phase machine? If so, add another 200$ or so for a VFD to run it.
Check the sliding surfaces for deep scores or wear patterns, also check for table travel: does it get tight at the ends of travel and loose in the middle? That's a good indication of wear.
Look for cracked cast iron parts- sometimes braze repairs are possible if all the parts are there but the price should be adjusted accordingly.
Good hunting
Mark
 
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GunsOfNavarone

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#8
I hear you about the American made. Sometime i search Craigslist or EBay for Vintage tools.....just love them. Coming across metal working tools like these, they are usually in BAD shape/not running and the weight is measured in tons (well, almost) when I buy new stuff, I have to make the decision of, would I like to have a lathe, mill & a butt load of tools for them, or one American made machine that I will be in debt for the next 4 years for....seriously.
 

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Mjohnson

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#9
That is the coolest lathe I've ever seen!

Sent from my Acer Chromebook R11 (CB5-132T / C738T) using Tapatalk
 

GunsOfNavarone

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#10
Sadly not mine....saw it on Instagram, it's my wallpaper. Sexier than any woman!
 

silence dogood

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#11
That lathe looks like something that a sewing machine company would come up with. Seriously, is that overhead arm a light?
 

Silverbullet

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#13
Good advise all around , start by lowering the head down to the table . Keep weight low , lock all moving parts , take handles off table and crooks slide . X+y , they get bent and break. Even with care engine hoist and straps is best , but sliding it will work with a cumalong just keep it low if possible screw or bolt the legs or base to 4x4s and pipe rollers three ft long time three it will roll all over and never fall on flat surface it can slide up ramps too. Get the picture pick your poison cheap the pipe cumalong 4x4 bolts cost less by a hundred easy . But straps to hold it down get two 2" ratchet straps x cross to trailer low not high. Get the low reason. Oh I forgot hi and welcome to the site were here to help or try to .
 

GunsOfNavarone

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#14
Not sure I would go that far, but it is a very cool machine. Not sure, but I'm going to guess Italian. Mike
You're right....but this thing is pretty to look at, I'm sure far better made than most anything you can find (within reason) is that Mustang in your avatar a 64& a half fastback?
 

dtsh

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#15
I'm a far cry from a professional, but this should be a good start....

As far as what to look for, start by checking the backlash. Move the table one way a few turns, then see how far the wheel turns in the reverse until the table starts to move; you should feel it when the backlash is out as a bit more resistance to turning the wheel. Check it at various points, it will help you find out where the heavy wear is. Turn it on, listen to the spindle for grinding or rattling. Take an indicator and stand with you to take measurements. Turn the table all the way one way and snug the gibs up so it's bound, then loosen it just enough to move again. Move the table and note, does it bind? Do the gib screws tighten up the same amount mid travel of the table? At the far end?

Often extra tooling can be worth as much or more than the machine itself. Does it have a vise, R8 collets, tool holders, endmills? Is the taper an R8?
 

mikey

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#17
Not sure what a Jet 16 is. Are you referring to a Jet JMD-15 or perhaps a JMD-18? The former is the equivalent of an RF-25, while the latter is nearly the same as an RF-30/31. These are mill/drills with round columns and typically sit on a sheet metal stand. Mill weight is about 400# or so and the whole thing is in the neighborhood of about 700#. On the stand, it is very top heavy.

If we are talking about a mill/drill, the easiest way to move it is to lower the head all the way down and lock the head with the two nuts on the right side. Use lifting straps and an engine hoist to lift it. I would remove all handles and any light fixture first so you don't damage them. Get the straps up close to the column and the thing will lift pretty easily with an engine hoist.

As far as what to look for, if it is nearly new as you say then it should be in fair shape. Jet machines are mostly/all made in Taiwan so they are a bit nicer than a Chinese equivalent. Backlash on these machines can be adjusted with the leadcrew nut on the X and Y axis. Spindle bearings are not expensive unless you opt for angular contact bearings. Drive sleeve bearings are cheap. I would make sure the motor is good and there is no significant wear on the ways or the table. The ways are flaked and you should be able to make out the pattern on the ways near the front. The gibs and the very un-precise tapered gib type but they work; make sure they're there.

Try to get all the tooling you can with this deal, especially a vise.

These machines are not difficult to work on, easy to adjust and can do some real work.
 

GunsOfNavarone

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#18
Seriously bummed, mill sold before I could get there. Anyway, anyone familiar with Bolton mills? More specifically, the 9 1\2 by 32 gear head ZX45? Looks damn good for novice but this is new territory for me...hence the search for help.
Thank all, you have been super helpful!
 
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