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Brento

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#1
I am the new owner of a South Bend model 9A for 600$. Will need a dusting off and such but has some tooling to go with it. Ill have pictures of it this saturday when i pick it up. I checked and the seller said it has all of the gears and it was a quick change model. Ill have to check it over bc i believe you can get more gears for these correct? I know one of my first projects is to do some metric threads. Is there any tips i should know about for this machine?
 
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Brento

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#3
Does anyone know how much these apparatus’s weigh? My plan was to put it upstairs on a concrete slab above my dads office in his automotive repair shop. That was when i was getting the grizzly 7x14 now that i have this he said and i quote “How the hell are you going to get that up there.” I said “I will take it apart” and he continues with “What are you nuts?”
 
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#4
Weight for a 3-1/2 foot bed is about 375 lbs. Maybe a little more.
 
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Brento

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#5
Hmm ok i wonder wat im going to do with this thing then.
 

woodchucker

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#6
I put my SB 9a in the basement. I took it apart to rebuild it. But even b4 that I had to take it apart to put it in the van.
The head comes off easily.
Take the banjo off the end and loosen the bolts that bolt the head on. Remove the head. Remove the tailstock.
move the carriage all the way toward the tailstock.
put a block of wood under the gear box to support the gear box. See if you can wedge it tight. Remove the 3 screws that hold the gearbox on. Carefully pull the gear box away from the bed so that the lead screw pulls out of the carriage..
Now you can remove the apron and carriage. Support the apron with a block of wood while loosening it.
Remove the plate at the back of the carriage underneath...
Each part should now be light enough to lift. The bed is the heaviest if I remember correctly.
Remove the lead screw from the gearbox. You will need to replace the felts so it's a good time to get that done... Order from ebay the rebuild kit.
It's a nice lathe.
 
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Brento

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#7
Thanks now with taking this stuff all off will it effect the tolerances of the machine at all? Do you remember what type of bolts they were as well? Just so i can get an idea on what tools ill need.
 

Bobby Bailey

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#8
Do you have enough room to skid it up the stairs using a winch or come-a-long. If so, it can be bolted to runners and skidded that way.
 
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Brento

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#9
Well the stairs are L shaped going aroud the office and the other platform isnt wide enough to spin it around.
 

woodchucker

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#10
First you have to relevel and test anyway.
Second any older lathe will need new oiling felts. Most get hard over time, so it's a good time to make it right. There's a nice kit on ebay.
You will get to know the lathe better by taking it apart and putting it back together. That part is not hard.
 

Ben Nevis

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#11
Back in 1985 I bought a 9c with the 36" bed. It was mounted on a sheet of plywood with countershaft and motor. The seller and I picked it up and placed it in the trunk of my car.(1977 Nova)
I had to take it apart to get it into the garage by myself, but it needed to be cleaned anyway.

Getting your's up the stairs will be a good workout, but should be doable with two people. Standing the bed on end will help with getting it around the corner.
 
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Brento

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#12
I think i have an idea for how i may do it im gonna talk to my old man tonight and see wat he wants to do or see what he came up with
 

rock_breaker

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#13
Would it be possible to stand it on end on a platform with braces to get it small enough to fit in the stairway L? Obviously the carriage should be against the head stock with some cushion material between the components. The tailstock could be removed for the move. It would not have to be turned if the platform is small enough. There is probably an oil reservoir in the carriage that should be drained before tilting. If you build a "verticle skid box" it should be hell for stout, using 4"X4"s and c-d plywood. Plenty of lag-screws and wood screws as well. In any case you may need some blocks of wood to place on the stair-way in the event you need to reorganize the move .Good luck and be safe
Ray.
 

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#14
You could strap it to a hand truck , should be easy to do . Rent a stair runner type with the rollers it works well.
 

woodchucker

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#15
It's heavier than you think. 350 is about right. Whatever you can do to lower the weight, I recommend you do. You won't regret it. But you might regret trying to do the whole thing at once. The head is self aligning due to the V type ways, and so is the carriage. So there's no reason to worry.
 
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Brento

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#16
We are now moving it to a different garage so no stairs. There is the issue of needing to get a protective spray since the garage isnt heated when not in use.
 

KBeitz

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#17
Make sure the stairs and floor can hold the weight....
 
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